EMC Customer Service: Our Hall Of Fame Achievements

first_imgWhy This MattersTSIA’s STAR Awards are recognized as one of the highest honors in the technology services industry. Winning these awards brings me much joy, as it reinforces EMC’s position as one of the market leaders in customer service – providing a proactive, predictive support experience that helps customers achieve their targeted business outcomes.Our Winning ApproachEMC Global Services has a three-pronged approach that has yielded us much success through the years. Without giving away all of the ingredients in our special sauce, here’s the approach we take:We Ask, Customers Respond, We ListenEMC uses several listening channels to develop a 360¡ view of our customers’ perceptions and experiences across their journey of buying, deploying, and operating EMC products, solutions and services. When we ask, we truly want to hear how we can improve. It’s not about a survey score; it’s about the success of our customers — our number one priority. Our commitment to a customer-first approach permeates every level and aspect of EMC – a tradition that has been in place for more than 30 years.We Drink Our Own Kool-Aid® For example, we use the EMC Federation Business Data Lake to gain insights into how our customers are using our products – insights that help us make informed business decisions and provide customers a proactive support experience that helps them identify issues before they ever impact their IT operations.We Enhance Our Products’ ServiceabilityOur engineering teams are constantly asking themselves how we can make our products even easier to self-maintain. For example, by designing and empowering our customers to self-install Customer Replaceable Units (CRUs), our field service personnel can focus on being even more proactive in helping customers optimize the performance of their EMC technology.(From left to right: Phil Lora, Frank Coleman, Kim Garbarino, Mary Cay Kosten, Ruya Atac-Barrett, Carolyn Muise, Shawn Murphy, Santiago Perez-Kolk)I’m thrilled to congratulate EMC’s entire services team for a job well done. And while I’m incredibly proud of our work and the recognition that we’ve received, I’m even more proud knowing that we won’t rest on our laurels and will continue to look for ways to improve and provide the best customer experience possible. By recently winning two STAR Awards from the Technology Services Industry Association (TSIA), EMC earned a 5th TSIA Hall of Fame Lifetime Achievement Award, only the second company to achieve this level in TSIA’s history.The TSIA defines service excellence with a litany of specific criteria and for an organization as large as EMC, it’s no easy feat to maintain these standards year-to-year. We’d like to believe that only through the dedication, smarts and talent of our people and the close, honest relationships we enjoy with our customers that we are able to achieve these standards consistently.For 2015, EMC won for:Best Practices in the Delivery of Field Service: EMC was recognized as the company that has most clearly and effectively delivered breakthrough results and established best practices in the improvement of customer, employee, and/or financial performance metrics within field services. Innovation in Leveraging Analytics for Service Excellence: EMC was recognized for demonstrating it has best leveraged analytics to improve operational performance, service levels or the customer experience.last_img read more

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The Modern Datacenter Architecture on Display at Dell EMC World

first_imgDell EMC World is right around the corner (May 8 thru 11). If you are anything like me, you know that not all conferences are the same. I’ve probably attended hundreds over my career – both industry and company specific. Some are good. Some are fantastic! I can’t remember looking forward to a conference as much as I am looking forward to this year’s Dell EMC World in Las Vegas. Why? A couple of reasons come to mind. For starters, all of Dell Technologies will be in one place, under one roof, at one conference. That’s exciting. The second reason is that I won’t have to hold back discussing the evolution of Dell EMC servers.We are expecting almost 13,000 people from more than 3,000 companies to attend this year. Meeting the admins, directors, and executives and talking about their business is the most rewarding part of the show for me. Over the years, the conversations around compute have changed a lot. In the past, we often spoke of server density and processor speed, but this year, I expect the chats to be around applications and consumption and how infrastructure can be optimized for specific workloads.What to See at the ConferenceThis year’s Dell EMC World will include immersive experiences and demos. Our Solutions Expo is always buzzing and so much fun. Sure, there is plenty of physical technology you can see and touch. But what is also inspiring is to see how people use it. I’ve seen race cars and hospital rooms in years past. Will the IoT cow from our TV commercials make an appearance this year? Who knows. But if you are going, make sure you swing by the Dell EMC PowerEdge server booth right in the middle of all the action. We’ll have plenty to show you.Listen, Learn, and TouchThis year’s event will have over 500 sessions and topics as well as hands-on labs. These are great opportunities to hear from some of the brightest minds across Dell Technologies. It’s your best chance to network with others and hear about the technology shaping their business. I realize that you can’t attend every session and you are likely mapping out an itinerary that covers technology you use and might use. With the data center transforming to a software-defined and workload centric model, make sure you have a couple of PowerEdge server sessions or hands-on labs on your list. We will have some really exciting things to share with you around automation and security. Here’s a list of sessions and hands-on labs.The Bedrock of The Modern Data Center: PowerEdge & Extreme Scale InfrastructureTop New Technologies Inside Dell EMC PowerEdge Servers That Will Change Your TCODell EMC PowerEdge Server Systems Management OverviewServer Management Simplicity Series: Deploying & Monitoring Dell EMC PowerEdge ServersIs Your Server Infrastructure Secure?Dell EMC Ready Nodes as a Foundation For SDSUtilizing Mobile Devices in The DatacenterThe Promise Of Rack-Scale Computing: Bringing Hyperscale Principles To Carriers & Service ProvidersPowerEdge FX2 (Hands-on Lab)Overview Of New iDRAC9 Features (Hands-on Lab)OpenManage Essentials & SupportAssist (Hands-on Lab)Redfish: The Next Generation Of Server Management AutomationInfrastructure Automation With PowerEdge Servers: Customer Case StudySee you in Vegas.last_img read more

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Survivors of Beirut’s explosion endure psychological scars

first_imgBEIRUT (AP) — Beirut’s massive explosion in August killed more than 200 people and injured thousands, but it wreaked perhaps even wider damage to mental health among Lebanese. Many of those who lived through it struggle with depression or symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. Thunderstorms or the frequent sound of Israeli warplane flyovers cause terror among some, forcing them to relive the blast. The explosion was unique even for conflict-scarred Lebanon, with tens of thousands of people experiencing the same traumatic event. It comes on top of multiple other crises causing stress, including an economic meltdown and the pandemic. Demand for therapists has ballooned even as many are unable to get treatment.last_img read more

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SMEAC Free Store offers used items

first_imgThe members of Saint Mary’s Environmental Action Coalition (SMEAC) strive to be positive role models on campus by promoting the well being of the environment and enacting change, Monica Aguirre, co-president of SMEAC, said. “A lot of the time, we are geared toward reaching out to the campus,” Aguirre said. The club hosts several programs and events at the College that are geared to draw awareness to environmental issues. One such program is the SMEAC Free Store, which is designed to allow students to reuse unwanted items instead of throwing them away. “We are helping the community, but we are trying to get the campus to help the community more,” said Katherine Kohler, the Free Store coordinator. The store is located in the basement of Le Mans Hall and offers a variety of items including furniture and decorative items such as vases and holiday décor. “Saint Mary’s needs to learn about recycling and reusing items because I think that sometimes in our population that idea is lost,” Aguirre said. “If you take something from the Free Store, the owner might see it and that should be OK. Just getting that mentality that it doesn’t have to be new.” The Free Store, which will now be open 24 hours, hosted its grand opening Sunday from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. “Instead of having to go out and buy bookshelves and other stuff, you can come here and get it for free, which will save money and save the environment,” said Ellen Huelsmann, vice president of SMEAC. The Free Store accepts almost all items that are in good condition, Kohler said. According to Aguirre, the club is planning other activities as well. A tie-dying event is currently in the works; students will be invited to bring an old shirt, tie-dye it and keep it. Another event SMEAC sponsors is Weigh Your Waste, an annual event that measures the amount of food students, faculty and staff dispose of during a single lunch period, will be held again this year. “That [Weigh Your Waste] has the potential to have the most impact because when you see that we we’ve wasted in one lunch period 150 pounds a day, which could be equivalent to over 500 pounds a day, this is fact,” Aguirre said. Other events include Race to Recycling, a competition in which two people sort through trashcans and determine what can and cannot be recycled. In addition, Aguirre said SMEAC is planning on making this year’s Earth Week bigger and better. The club meets weekly to plan activities and discuss how to get students involved. “It’s only an hour commitment, but what the campus gets back from everybody getting involved is a lot because we’re changing the ideas on campus,” Kohler said. “If you care about it, do something.”last_img read more

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Students make cards for Sullivan family

first_imgStudent government delivered more than 200 letters from members of the Notre Dame community to the family of junior Declan Sullivan on Monday, student body chief of staff Nick Ruof said. “The Notre Dame family is truly a family and it was shown over these past few days,” Ruof said. “Everyone came together to be arm-in-arm together in support.” Student government wanted to allow students to show their support for the Sullivan family after Sullivan’s death, Ruof said. In a Thursday e-mail, student body president Catherine Soler and student body vice president Andrew Bell invited students to bring notes and cards to their office in LaFortune Student Center. “As student government we wanted a cohesive effort to send things to the family instead of berating them with mail,” Ruof said. “We wanted a unified student body response to the Sullivan family.” The Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore donated 200 cards that were available at the reception following Thursday’s Mass of Remembrance in honor of Sullivan. The remaining cards were later available in the student government office, and they were all used, according to Bell. Students also placed many other envelopes in the collection box, Bell said. Student government collected cards throughout the weekend so students had time to reflect, Ruof said. “We wanted to be a place for students to send their sympathies through us to the family,” Ruof said. Ruof said the fact that many students who did not know Sullivan wrote letters to his family represents the manner in which the student body has united following Wednesday’s accident. “We want to let the Sullivan family grieve,” Ruof said. “We want to give them their privacy but facilitate the student body’s sympathies to the family at the same time.” Bell said the University provided buses to transport students, football players, student athletic managers and videographers from campus to Sullivan’s funeral in Buffalo Grove, Ill. Monday. Various administrators, deans and representatives of Student Affairs were also present at Monday’s funeral Mass, Bell said. The University is looking to work with Fisher Hall and the Financial Management Board to create a memorial scholarship in Declan’s name, Ruof said. “We want to show support for the family as well as for the men of Fisher and the women of Lewis,” Ruof said. Ruof said student government would also organize a tribute to Sullivan during the home game against Utah on Nov. 13 to show continued support in the Notre Dame community for Sullivan’s family.last_img read more

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OIT works on CIF system after Dec. crash

first_imgThe University’s Course Instructor Feedback (CIF) system experienced problems at the end of last semester, resulting in the entire student body receiving their grades at the earliest time, Erin Hoffmann Harding, associate vice president for Strategic Planning, said. “For a period of about three hours on the last night of the CIF window for most undergraduate courses, the OIT server supporting the CIF system experienced a slow down in performance,” Hoffmann Harding said. “The system never crashed, almost 1,000 surveys were successfully submitted during this time and no information was lost.” Some students who tried to access the system could not complete their CIFs, she said. Beginning during the 2009 fall semester, completing CIFs allowed students to view their semester grades seven days early. “The system slow down prevented some students from successfully submitting their CIFs,” she said. “Unfortunately, it was not possible to reopen the survey system prior to the beginning of final exams. It was also not feasible to identify which students had been affected by the slowed performance.” Administrators decided to modify the grade holding policy for the fall semester only, Hoffmann Harding said. OIT is investigating the system problems, and the early grade incentive will exist again in the spring. Hoffmann Harding said the CIF system is still in development, and the next priority is to solve the performance speed. “The system will also soon have the ability to provide more customized information to students in e-mails about which CIFs they still need to complete and when their individual survey windows close,” she said. “We welcome suggestions about other enhancements that would improve students’ ability to offer feedback to their professors.” The response rate was 78 percent for all of the fall 2010 courses, she said. This rate was lower than fall 2009, but exceeded the response rate for fall 2008. Dennis Jacobs, vice president and associate provost, said feedback from CIFs is integrated into the classroom through feedback given directly to departments and faculty. “Instructors are provided with a detailed summary report of the CIF data collected for every course section they teach,” Jacobs said. “For each CIF item, the instructor can see the distribution of student responses, a calculated mean score, and a comparison to the scores received by other faculty who teach similar courses at Notre Dame.” Professors also see the open-ended answers, but they cannot see student names, he said. This allows for anonymity. “Many faculty members reflect on thoughtful CIF feedback from their students as they consider ways to improve their teaching in future semesters,” he said. Past improvements to CIFs have provided more incentive for students to complete them, Jacobs said. “Five of the questions appearing on the CIF were written together by students and faculty with the purpose of providing more information at the time of course selection,” he said. “The results to these five items are displayed within Class Search on the Registrar’s website.” Only students who have completed their CIFs the previous semester can view these results, Jacobs said. “This enhancement to Class Search along with gaining earlier access to grades provide two valuable incentives for students to complete all their CIFs,” he said.last_img read more

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Phishing scams target students

first_imgA Phishing scam infiltrated Notre Dame G-mail accounts and sent massive amounts of spam from nd.edu addresses, the Office of Information Technologies (OIT) reported Tuesday in an e-mail to the student body. The scam blocked nd.edu users from e-mailing hotmail.com users. OIT administrators are communicating with hotmail to lift the blocks, and OIT recommended using alternate communication with hotmail users, the e-mail said. The e-mail warned that other e-mail services may be blocking ND e-mails for the same reason. “Over the weekend, spammers compromised several [Notre Dame] NetIDs and used those accounts to send thousands of spam e-mail messages,” the e-mail said. “Spammers most likely gained control over these accounts when the account owners responded to a phishing scam by providing their NetID and password.” The OIT Helpdesk helped students who were hacked by the phishing scam, David Seidl, manager of information security for OIT, said. When OIT discovered the scam, Seidl said the office responded to protect the Notre Dame network and e-mail accounts. “We blocked access to the site from campus, preventing people who clicked the link from accessing the site,” he said. “We sent messages specifically reminding campus users about the phishing attacks and what not to do.” The OIT staff also checked for systems that contacted the phishing site so they could notify system administrators whose users had visited it. “When we discover a compromised account being exploited, our first step is to have the Helpdesk change the password and lock the account so the spammer can no longer use it,” he said. “They then try to contact the account owner to let them know, but often do not have a telephone number to do so, and obviously they no longer can access their e-mail.” Without a phone number, Seidl said OIT must wait for the nd.edu user to discover the problem and contact his or her administrator. Seidl said Notre Dame students, faculty and staff can prevent phishing by taking a few preventative steps. “First, remember that the OIT, Notre Dame or any other legitimate organization will never request your password or account information by e-mail,” he said. “Second, be cautious of any URL that asks for your Net ID and password does not end with nd.edu. Third, type URLs manually rather than clicking on them. “You can also usually see the URL that link is hiding by hovering your mouse over it to see what the link actually is.” Phishing sites pose as secure websites and request personal information from visitors, including usernames, passwords, bank account numbers and credit card numbers. Phishers then use that username and password to log into the campus e-mail system to send span e-mail, Seidl said. The scammers used the Notre Dame Outlook Web Access (OWA) to send the spam e-mails. “The high volume of mail sent by spammers in this type of event can result in our campus e-mail servers being blacklisted, blocked, by major email providers like Hotmail and Yahoo,” he said. “Our system administrators are typically able to remedy this quickly, and our campus e-mail servers are configured to prevent this from being a significant issue in most cases.” More information about phishing scams can be found at http://oit.nd.edu/email/phishingfaq.shtmllast_img read more

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Students celebrate sweet victory

first_imgSeniors left Notre Dame Stadium on Saturday feeling content after the football team defeated Boston College 16-14. Though the Irish won by less than he expected, senior Matt Sushinsky said he was still happy with the outcome. “It is always nice to win, but I think we should have won by a lot more seeing as how we were playing Boston College. But a win is a win,” Sushinsky said. Participating in the traditional Senior Day marshmallow fight was especially enjoyable for Sushinsky. “The marshmallow fight was a lot of fun. It is nice that the seniors have a great tradition for their final home game,” Sushinsky said. “It did get a little messy, but I think we all had a blast.” Seniors rushed the field after the Irish victory, a tradition Sushinsky said meant a lot to him. “For all Notre Dame students, the field is a sacred place,” Sushinsky said. “Being able to go out there after the game and walk on the field where some of the greatest football players have played was a great finale to my four years here.  “It also was nice to touch the grass before they decide to get turf or something.” Senior Meghan Donoghue said a lackluster effort by the Irish did not hinder the football environment.  “[Saturday] definitely was not the best performance I have seen in my four years here,” Donoghue said. “However, I was caught up in the moment of this being my final time inside Notre Dame Stadium as a student, so I was not affected by the play on the field.” Donoghue said the atmosphere in the senior student section was amazing. “Being around fellow classmates made us all feel lucky to attend a school where there is so much camaraderie,” Donoghue said. “Needless to say, it was a great ending to our four-year football careers.” Senior Christina Carson echoed Donoghue’s feelings regarding the environment at the last home game. “All of the seniors rallied around the fact that it was the last home game,” Carson said. “There was tons of spirit which was cool.” Carson said going onto the field after the game was the highlight of the bittersweet weekend. “It was fun to get on the field after the game, although it was not as climactic as previous years,” Carson said.  Both Donoghue and Carson agreed that the Irish offense must show up in Palo Alto, Calif., on Saturday if the team is to have a chance of knocking off the Cardinal. “Stanford is a really good team,” Donoghue said. “Hopefully we can put on a good showing, but no matter the outcome, we have had a great run at it this year.” Carson reflected on the loss of senior running back Jonas Gray to injury. “The absence of [Jonas] Gray will significantly hurt our running game, but hopefully we will be able to put some points up on the board,” Carson said. Douglas Farmer contributed to this report.last_img read more

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Panel analyzes school choice debate

first_imgPanelists examined the growing movement to allow families to choose their child’s school Tuesday night in a discussion on school choice titled “To Choose or Not to Choose.” The panelists included director of teacher formation and education policy at the Alliance for Catholic Education, John Schoenig, who said he wanted to emphasize the importance of staying true to intentions. “I would imagine that the perspectives on what education reform means in the first place is as varied as the number of people in the room. I don’t like giving advice, but I do like contradicting myself, so I’ll tell you this: It’s very important that you find ways to decouple, divest, separate … your purpose and the means to get to your purpose, to effect social change,” he said. Schoenig said the focus of the movement should be to provide children with the best education possible. “We too often allow ourselves to get too tied to the methods to get our things done. What is the purpose you believe in? What you’ll find, if you’re really honest with yourself, you’ll say your purpose is making sure that every child has an equal opportunity at education. But your means to get there may change,” Schoenig said. Maria McKenna, senior associate director of education, schooling and society at the Institute for Educational Initiatives, spoke about the many changes that have occurred over the past 40 years in regards to early education. “To get us situated in the landscape, 40 years ago looks so different than today. In the 90s, we made this choice that one of the ways we’re thinking about leveling that playing field is that we’re allowing these kids to go to schools that weren’t operated by the school district,” McKenna said. The change came from a state level due to certain revelations, Schoenig said. “In 1990, we came to a place where we realized that maybe the state doesn’t need to operate all of the schools it regulates or funds, it’s not that far to say that it doesn’t have to have to operate any school it funds,” he said. “The entire landscape had changed into a choice-based marketplace. It’s probably here to stay, and now it’s about trying to figure out how to best deal with it.”“The idea of having options, and equating that with a market-based system, is not necessarily a bad thing,” McKenna said. Notre Dame MBA student Steven L’Huereux spoke on his experience working in New Orleans as an educator in one of the worst-performing areas of Louisiana.“For the last four years, I’ve been working in charter schools down there. We had to enroll 550 brand new students, and at that point, there was no common application for all the schools. They would have to travel to a school, fill out the form and it was really difficult,” L’Huereux said.  To solve this problem, the recovery school district centralized the process through the OneApp, a system designed to streamline the application process, he said. “Now, you can rank the schools in terms of which ones you wanted to attend. Regardless of where these students lived, they could apply to any school that participated in the OneApp,” L’Huereux said. This influx of options has afforded children with more options than they were allowed 40 years ago, according to Schoenig.“Take the inner city closest to your home and imagine being a marginalized child living there. In almost every one of those inner cities, those children have many, many more options to choose than they did 40 years ago,” Schoenig said.Schoenig said education is more than a policy or a social change issue. “If today’s conversation is about choice, it’s not really about any of that other stuff, it’s about human dignity,” he said.  “If you think about marginalized children and families in that city and the things they have to decide, the choices they have to make. All of the choices you make every day, to go across the way and get Starbucks or to get coffee from elsewhere, these aren’t choices these families can make. The effect of educating by zip code is to deny people the access to choice that we used to have.”Tags: #SCOP, ACE, school choicelast_img read more

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