Resource Stewardship Department: New Director and Rename

first_imgFacebook45Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Thurston County Board of CommissionersWith the vacancy of the Resource Stewardship director position, the Thurston County Board of Commissioners have taken the opportunity to align the work of the department with its name, along with performing a national recruitment process to fill the director position.Joshua Cummings is moving from the interim director position to the director position after a unanimous vote. Photo courtesy: Thurston County Board of CommissionersThe Commissioners unanimously voted to appoint Interim Director, Joshua Cummings to the director position and to change the name of the department to the Department of Community Planning & Economic Development (CPED).The Commissioners held an executive session on January 8, 2018 and voted unanimously during an open public meeting requesting the county manager to offer the position to Mr. Cummings. Cummings accepted the position and will begin in his role as the director on January 16. He has served as the Interim Resource Stewardship Director since September 26, 2017.Joshua obtained his B.A. in Political Science from Western Washington University in 2000 and is currently enrolled in a Master’s of Science degree program in Management and Leadership from Western Governors University. He is a Leadership Thurston County graduate and is a Certified Building Operator, level 1.Cummings has worked for Thurston County since February 2013 serving as the Sustainability and Economic Development Manager as well as the Interim Resource Stewardship Director for the past three months. Cummings has also worked as the Federal Affairs Manager for Weyerhaeuser Company, Congressional Staff for Representative Norm Dicks, and as staff for the Leon and Sylvia Panetta Institute for Public Policy.“Joshua’s leadership, strategic thinking, and communication have been, and will continue to be, a great asset for the Department of Community Planning & Economic Development and the County,” said County Manager Ramiro Chavez. “He has made some innovative adjustments in the department during his interim appointment and I believe he has the right vision to move the department forward.”With Joshua’s leadership and vision, the Commissioners approved the new name for the department. Cummings said, “The Community Planning & Economic Development (CPED) department is at the forefront of ensuring people can build homes, businesses, and appropriately utilize and care for the natural resources of the region. It is my honor to serve as the director of this department. I look forward to engaging with citizens and our team to continue providing great customer service and innovation in the services we provide.”last_img read more

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Thurston County Health Officer: Letter to the Community COVID-19 Update

first_imgFacebook94Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Thurston CountyLetter to the CommunityMay 5, 2020Welcome to the month of May. I want to take this opportunity to thank the backbone of our medical workforce, our amazing NURSES! A huge shout out – Happy Nurses day tomorrow, May 6!!This week, Governor Inslee announced that we are entering Phase 1 of Washington State’s plan at modifying physical distancing measures. While folks in the high-risk categories are still encouraged to stay home and stay healthy, a few outdoor recreation activities are allowed as long as people maintain their physical distancing of at least 6 feet, and there are facilities for handwashing or hand sanitation. A few more businesses are also allowed to operate under the same guidelines.In our new ‘normal’, the new community standard is that people will:Maintain at least 6 feet distance from others (except household members).Wear a face covering, if not medically contraindicated, when you are out in public or cannot avoid being less than 6 feet away from someone.Cover your coughs and sneezes.Wash your hands or use hand sanitizer as part of your routine.Stay home when you are ill and stay away from anyone else who is ill.Many businesses that provide essential services, like grocery stores, airlines, and warehouse stores are now asking everyone to wear a face covering when in their facility. This is an attempt to protect their workers and others from COVID-19. Wearing a face covering helps to protect others in case you sneeze or cough, or are just starting to come down with symptoms.It will take a few weeks of sustained decrease in cases, an increase in people getting tested for COVID-19, and continued case and contact tracing by the statewide public health system to help move Washington to phase 2 of the plan. We will be carefully monitoring our cases, health care facility capacity, and ability to respond.Over the next three weeks, we plan to increase access to testing. Right now, we recommend viral testing for anyone with symptoms. Symptoms are a new onset of cough or shortness of breath plus at least 2 other symptoms (fever, chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, or new loss of sense of taste or smell). Contact your health care provider to see if you can come in for a test. We are not yet recommending testing for persons without symptoms.If you are symptomatic and do not have access to a health care provider, contact the Providence Hawks Prairie testing site, which is open Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. at 855-776-4362. Please call before you go!Anyone being tested due to symptoms of COVID-19 will be asked to remain isolated from others until they receive their test results back. If you test positive, you will receive a call from our Health Department providing you guidance and support for the period of isolation. If you test positive, everyone in your household will also be asked to quarantine in place.Please make it a practice to stay home when you are sick. This will help decrease spread of illness. If you are houseless, there is an isolation facility available for temporary housing while you await results or for the period of isolation you need.Please continue to stay safe as we start easing into decreasing restrictions. Thank you for your patience!Diana T. Yu, MD, MSPHActing Health Officer, Thurston Countylast_img read more

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Virat Kohli recounts playing against Kane Williamson and Steve Smith in the 2008 ICC…

first_imgImage Courtesy: CricnWin/ICCAdvertisement eNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs2adlWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Eecpt( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 9v3aWould you ever consider trying this?😱bqo5pCan your students do this? 🌚9urRoller skating! Powered by Firework Virat Kohli, who is the inevitable part of Team India and Test cricket’s success in recent history, had his start in 2006 as a member of the Indian under 19 squad for the ODI tour of England. Two years later, Kohli captained the youth team on road to success at the ICC Under 19 Cricket World Cup, and lifted the trophy in Malaysia. Recalling his early days, the skipper named the two players as the most impressive in that tournament, and it was none other than the Aussie superstar Steve Smith and the New Zealand icon Kane Williamson.Advertisement Image Courtesy: CricnWin/ICCKohli, who was 19 at the time of the tournament, had impressed the fans, veterans and cricketing pundits, with his physical approach to a consistent performance. Featured in a recent ICC broadcast, the 31 year old was quoted saying: “The ICC U19 World Cup was a very important milestone in my career.”Virat Kohli had a marvellous spell in the tournament. In the Group B match against West Indies, the hitter scored an amazing 100 off 74, and even picked two wickets in the semi final face off against New Zealand.Advertisement He continued: “It helped us get a good platform to build on and make our careers from thereon, so it holds a very important place in my mind and heart. It is very important to understand and respect the opportunity it provides to you.”However, he also shed all the appraisal at Smith and Williamson, the latter who Kohli faced in the semis. In the video, Kohli spoke positive about the Black Caps skipper.Advertisement “I remember playing against Kane (Williamson). He was someone who always stood out in the team, his batting ability was very different from the other players who were around.” Kohli was noted saying.The 2008 under 19 world cup saw the rise of another big name in cricket, the legendary Steve Smith. Although not playing a direct match against him, Kohli remembered the marvellous performance of the young Aussie icon in the tournament.“It is good to know that so many people from that batch, like Kane and Steve Smith, have played for their respective countries,” the Royal Challengers Bangalore leader added.Kohli, who has earned an astounding 242 ODI caps for the Men in Blues, has scored a monumental 11,609 runs for the international squad. In 2008 alone, the youngster from Delhi scored 235 runs with a batting average of 47 in the game format.Also read-Even Virat Kohli can’t believe his 10 Year transformation challenge!Virat Kohli ends 2019 as the number 1 batsman in the ICC Test rankings Advertisementlast_img read more

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Croydon Hall Memorial Recalls “An Extraordinary Person”

first_imgThe memorial to Daniel Piano at Croydon in Leonardo.Colleen Piano speaks about her deceased son, Daniel as daughter Julianne Piano lends her support.By Eileen Moon MIDDLETOWN – Colleen Piano has many happy memories of her son, Daniel’s growing up years in Leonardo. “He was a special kid,” she said recently, recalling the many hours he spent playing ball and skateboarding at Croydon Hall, a township park off Leonardville Road.Only 18 years old, Daniel died on September 2 in an early morning accident on Chapel Hill Road in Middletown.Earlier that day, Daniel had been at Brookdale Community College, picking up textbooks he would need for his first semester as a college student.But that was not to be.His funeral took place on September 6, the day he would have started classes.As news of the accident circulated, his friends from high school quickly established a makeshift memorial for Daniel at the side of Chapel Hill Road, but that was not a place that his mother wanted to visit.“Losing a child is just horrific,” she told Colleen Piano speaks about her deceased son, Daniel as daughter Julianne Piano lends her support.he Two River Times last week. “I would give my right arm to have him back in my life.”Shy and reserved in his early years, Daniel grew into a sociable young man whose caring nature won him many friends.“In his 18 years, he touched so many lives,” Colleen said, who took a family leave from Monmouth Medical Center, where she is employed as an executive assistant, following the death of her son.In the midst of her grief, she paid a visit to a psychic – a former religious sister, who told her that she would receive a beautiful, handwritten letter.On the first of Nov., a handwritten letter arrived, written about Daniel by his Italian teacher in high school, Lina Santori. Santori related how Daniel had approached her at the start of the year, looking directly into her eyes as he introduced himself, saying, “How are you? I’m Dan Piano.”The simple introduction was a good example of Daniel’s concern for others, the teacher noted, commenting on what an extraordinary person Daniel was.“He was so much more mature than his peers – he became her favorite,” Colleen said.And as she struggled daily with her grief, Colleen decided that she needed to create a memorial to her son; a place of peace where she could remember again the happy years that Colleen, Daniel’s father, also Daniel Piano, and their daughter, Julianne, had shared with Daniel.After obtaining permission from the township, Colleen arranged for the construction of a memorial for Daniel at Corydon Hall, where Daniel had spent so many happy hours of his childhood.The costs involved in creating the memorial were covered by private donations as well as donations of labor and materials. The memorial includes a brick walkway, a park bench and a Kwanzan Cherry tree.On Nov. 20, the Piano family and their friends gathered at the memorial to share their tears, and to remember the gift of Daniel.last_img read more

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Tree Lighting Sept. 6 to Honor Kids Cancer Foundation

first_imgLONG BRANCH – The Valerie Fund Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, as part of The Children’s Hospital at Mon­mouth Medical Center, will host a special Tree Lighting Ceremony and Reception honoring Make Some Noise: Cure Kids Cancer Foun­dation 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6 in front of the Sea Bright firehouse, 1099 East Ocean Ave.The event is part of the Go Gold for Pediatric Cancer Cam­paign, a joint effort between Make Some Noise: Cure Kids Cancer Foun­dation and Monmouth Medical Center.The campaign is designed to raise awareness of childhood cancer and the need for critical research funding during the month of Septem­ber, which is recognized nationally as Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.According to the Ameri­can Childhood Cancer Organ­i­za­tion, each boy in the United States has a 1-in-300 chance of being diagnosed with cancer before his 20th birthday; every girl has a 1-in-333 chance. In spite of such high statistics, less than 3 percent of federal cancer research funding goes to pediatric cancer.The tree lighting event will feature personal perspectives from children and families who have benefited from The Valerie Fund Children’s Center at Monmouth Medical Center, including Tim and Beth McLoone of McLoone’s Restaurants and their son Jack, plus commentary from Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno, Sea Bright Mayor Dina and Margaret Fisher, M.D., chair of pediatrics and medical director of The Children’s Hospital at Monmouth Medical Center.Gold ribbons – the trademark color of the Make Some Noise Foundation – will be available for all participants to place on the tree. After the tree is decorated, the crowd will be invited to raise their voices for pediatric cancer awareness alongside ringing church bells and fire alarms. A reception will immediately follow the program.“We are excited to bring the Sea Bright community together to raise awareness and ‘make some noise’ for such an important cause,” said Susan Dulczak, clinical director, The Valerie Fund Children’s Center at Mon­mouth Medical Center. “Pediatric cancer is a disease with a devastating impact on both children and their families. There is a crucial need for more pediatric cancer research and funding,”Also on hand at the event will be information about Roll Out The Ribbons, Monmouth Medical Center’s unique awareness campaign designed to strengthen the fight against all types of cancer and honor courageous individuals who have and are fighting the battle.To learn more about Roll Out the Ribbons, visit www.rollouttheribbons.com or call 1-877-360-6275. Get connected by “liking” Roll Out The Ribbons on Facebook and following @RollOutRibbons on Twitter.For more information about Make Some Noise, visit www.makenoise4kids.org. For further information about The Children’s Hos­pital at Mon­mouth Medical Center or the Valerie Fund, please visit www.barnabashealth.org/Monmouth.last_img read more

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New Shopping Center Coming to Newman Springs Road

first_imgBy John BurtonSHREWSBURY – Development of a new shopping center on the former site of Memory Lanes by the firm behind The Grove promises to please Two River shoppers within a month.“That’s what I always try to do,” with these projects, said Metrovation/Terranomics Chris Cole. “Create an interesting mix of tenants for the customer.”Speaking of the 89 Newman Springs Road location, Metrovation’s retail and commercial site is in the final stages of construction and Cole said his firm is looking to fill the relatively small site with the type of businesses that would appeal to the Two-River-area shopper. The site is expected to have three to four businesses, with one tenant already signed, and construction estimated to be finished within the month, according to Cole.Metrovation/Terranomics is a Seattle, Washington-based firm behind The Grove and Grove West shopping centers on Broad Street/Highway 35, in Shrewsbury, and the Brook 35 and West shopping centers, Sea Girt, and is a partner in the large-scale residential and commercial project West Side Lofts, completing construction on the west side of Red Bank.The approximately 48,825 square-foot lot, on the southern side of Newman Springs Road/County Road 520, a short distance from the Grove and Grove West and about a mile from downtown Red Bank, had been the home to Memory Lane Bowling until it was destroyed by fire in June 2009 with Metrovation purchasing the site in 2013.Cole regularly drives along Newman Springs Road and when the property became available he “thought it was a good location for another retail spot.”Platypus, a home furnishings store, has closed its Grove shop and will relocate to 89 Newman Springs Road. “They wanted to stay in this market,” Cole said, believing the move is “a logical place for them.”The development has been approved and can accommodate up to a 1,500 square-foot restaurant, and Metrovation is continuing to secure an appropriate eatery for the site. In addition, the firm is in negotiations with a mix of national, regional and independent retailers about taking the additional available spaces.“We’re trying to figure what the right mix of it is,” for the shopping center, he said.And that’s the strategy for Metrovation, he explained: “A certain synergy between the tenants,” and businesses that would appeal to area shoppers. “I think the Grove has a little bit for everyone,” Cole said, “and I think this one will as well.”He expected the shopping center will be fully leased by the end of spring.last_img read more

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Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness

first_imgBy Emma Wulfhorst |SHREWSBURY — People young and old, from different towns, states and even countries, gathered on the lawn outside the historic Allen House, 400 Sycamore Ave. on Tuesday, July 4, for the Monmouth County Historical Association’s (MCHA) 3rd Annual Independence Day Celebration.Tuesday’s joyous event drew a crowd of 400 excited participants, including families from Brooklyn, Philadelphia, and even one seven-year-old girl from Costa Rica who was here visiting her grandmother. Many people chose to stand throughout the entirety of the morning, while others brought chairs and blankets to sit on.The MCHA’s education committee started the annual celebration three years ago as a way to bring the history of the Declaration of Independence to residents in a fun and entertaining way. “We have an education committee of our trustees and they hold their meetings here at the Allen House, which was the Blue Ball Tavern,” explained MCHA president Linda Bricker of Rumson. The tavern operated in the late 1700s to early 1800s. “We always talked about how the tavern was the center of community life, and we imagine that back in the day this is where the community came to get the news about the Declaration of Independence.”In May 2015, MCHA’s recently appointed interim director Chuck Jones, who at the time was the education committee chair, thought, “Why don’t we invite people to come and hear (the Declaration of Independence) and read it out loud?” The committee members questioned whether they could put together such an event on short notice, but were ultimately successful.“That first year, we had very little time to publicize it, but lo and behold we had 200 people show up here at 10 in the morning,” said Bricker. “We knew we had touched a chord with people and that it was worth repeating.”Three years later, the event continues to be a simple but powerful gathering. It features refreshments, served in the form of lemonade and homemade cookies; an invocation, given by Rev. Lisa Mitchell of Christ Church; the singing of the Star-Spangled Banner, performed a-cappella by Rumson student Owen Doherty; and finally the reading of the Declaration of Independence. “People just really enjoyed the simplicity of it,” Bricker said.Participating in the annual event were William Githens of Neptune; and three sisters from Little Silver, Juliet, 6; Noelle, 3; and Carrie Davis, 6.There was also the Pledge of Allegiance and the color guard, performed for the second year in a row by the Rumson Boy Scouts, Troop #201. “It’s the most important day of the year and the Boy Scouts are a big part of Americana,” said the troop’s Scout Master, Andrew Young. “We’re very proud to be here and to celebrate the day.”For the recitation, the Declaration is divided into 31 sections. Each section is read by a different person. The first section was read by Lillian Burry, director of the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders, and the last part by Shrewsbury Mayor Donald Burden. The rest of the readers were chosen at random from those in the crowd.“We want little and big voices,” Bricker said, explaining how they try to choose a diverse group of readers, both young and old, from different places.Some read with gravitas, like Mark Molyneaux, of Fair Haven, who said, “If you’re gonna do it, own it.” Others, like Shrewsbury native Iona Leslie, 11, could barely reach the microphone, but handled the difficult wording of her paragraph with poise and expertise.Two of the younger voices this year were Emma and Abby Bacher, sisters from Philadelphia, who attended Tuesday’s event at the request of their uncle, Gabe Migoyo, of Bradley Beach, who also read a section. Migoyo participated in the celebration last year, and felt it was an important experience for his nieces to have.The audience on Tuesday was quiet yet engaged, listening intently to the words of the Declaration. Some hung their heads or closed their eyes, while others mouthed along, reciting the words in time with the readers at the microphone.“I thought it was really cool getting to listen to something that happened in our country’s past,” said Sonia Sergeant, 14. “I think that it’s really important for kids our age to listen to this type of thing.” Sonia, and her brother Kai, 11, enjoyed their first MCHA Independence Day celebration with their parents. The family lives in Brooklyn but has a summer home in Monmouth Beach.One noticeable difference at this year’s celebration was the upgraded sound system, made possible by the Independence Day Celebration’s first ever sponsors, MCHA trustee, Amy Almasy, and Kim Quigley, from Heritage House Sotheby’s International Realty.The celebration didn’t end after the Declaration of Independence had been read. Attendees were invited to get a close-up view of Christ Church’s treasured 300-year old Vinegar Bible. Published in Oxford, England, it has been in the church’s possession since 1752. The Bible, which is in remarkably good shape, got its unusual name because of a typo for the Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard and is believed to be only one of six that exists.There was also a performance by the Dead Actors’ Guild at Christ Church. The Allen House and the Shrewsbury Historical Society Museum, located across the street in the Shrewsbury Municipal Center, were also open until noon for tours.This area, the intersection of Sycamore Ave. and Broad St./Route 35, is known as the historic Four Corners, because of the significance of the buildings which stand there. The historic Four Corners is comprised of the Allen House, circa 1710; Christ Church, 1702; the Presbyterian Church, 1735; and the Quaker Meeting House, 1672.Robin Blair, vice president of the Shrewsbury Historical Society executive board, was in the Shrewsbury Historical Society’s Museum on Tuesday giving tours, and looking for volunteers. “There are a lot of materials that we need to purge, and a lot of materials which need to go in to archival protection,” Blair said, while discussing the museum’s extensive collection of memorabilia. “We’re looking for grants and time and interested people.”“The reason people want to live here is, it’s not just a beautiful place to live, but it’s a place that’s rich in its own history,” said MCHA interim director Jones, “and those are things that deserve to be preserved and learned about. An event like this is really emblematic of the work we do.”This article was first published in the July 6-13, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Vixens get last laugh against Blueliners, win Icebreaker tourney

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsThe Nelson Blueliners may have won the battle, but the Vernon Vixens won the war.The Central Okanagan squad scored a narrow 3-2 victory over the host Blueliners to claim the top prize at the Icebreaker Women’s Hockey Tournament Sunday at the NDCC Arena.The win came after Nelson defeated Vernon during the round robin action.Danielle Grundy’s third goal of the game coming in the third period proved to be the winner as Vernon held on for the one-goal victory.The teams were tied at 1-1 after one period before Grundy gave Vernon a 2-1 lead after 40 minutes.The teams exchanged goals in the third period.Lauren Strudwick and Rachel Holt scored for Nelson.Saturday, the Blueliners scored two quick goals in the third period to snap a 1-1 tie to defeat the Vixens.In the consolation round Whitefish Whalers scored two third period goals to rally past Trail Chix with Sticks 2-1.Cody McCarthy and Essie Roberts scored in the third.Judi Troman had given Trail a 1-0 advantage after 40 minutes.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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Leaf killer Scott Morriseau sinks Nelson in OT, Rebels one game away from advancing to Murdoch Final

first_imgBy Bruce Fuhr, The Nelson DailyMan that’s playoff hockey — not!In a game that most definitely had coaches Frank Maida and Steve Junker searching the trainer’s room for bottles of Alka-Seltzer to help cure strong cases of acid indigestion, the Castlegar Rebels somehow managed to pull out a 7-6 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League overtime victory Tuesday night at the NDCC Arena.Scott Morriseau, scoring his sixth of the series, won the game in the final minutes of the first overtime period.“I don’t know about that one,” Morriseau responded when asked about if he’s the newest Leaf killer, “but things are definitely going my way right now.”Morriseau deflected a Riley Henderson point shot past a surprised Andrew Walton to give the Rebels a commanding 3-1 lead in the Murdoch Division semi final.Castlegar can eliminate the Leafs from the post-season and advance down the playoff trail against the winner of the Beaver Valley/Spokane series with a win Thursday in the Sunflower City.“I just decided to go straight to the net and luckily the puck went off my stick and into the net,” said Morriseau, describing the game-winner at the 8:55 mark of overtime.The contest did not go according to textbook for both teams.Two teams that combined for 17 goals in three games — only three in game two— scored nine in the opening 20 minutes Tuesday. After building a 2-0 lead on goals by Brendan Heinrich and Stuart Walton 39 seconds apart, the teams traded volleys until Nick Newman finished off the scoring in the final minute of the frame.“We’re not a team that gives up that many goals, especially in the first period,” Morriseau said. “Obviously we talked about that and we have to bare down to next game.”Despite struggling with defensive zone coverage the Leafs battled back — tying the game on a goal by Patrick Martens with 35 seconds remaining in the third period —  and had two or three chances to win the game in the extra period.Nelson now must win three straight games to avoid being eliminated in the first round for the second straight year.“It’s depressing,” said Leaf forward Colton Schell“Everyone is taking it hard in the dressing room. We really needed this game.”The game was a career night for Castlegar rookie Brendan Heinrich, who finished the game with two goals and three assists.Morriseau added had four points while Henderson, Tyler Robinson, Connor Bowen also scored for Castlegar.Max Mois, having a bounce-back game as he continually pounded the Castlegar defence with several crushing bodychecks, Matthew Naka, J.J. Beitel and Carsen Willans, scoring his first career playoff goal, completed the Nelson scoring.Nelson out shot Castlegar by a 44-32 count, including an 18-4 margin in the third period.“It seems (Castlegar) is a way more energized on the bench then we are . . . everyone yelling after big hits, goal or back check,” Schell explained. “Our guys are a lot more quiet . . . we don’t have that many leaders on our team.”Game time Thursday is 7:30 p.m.GAME NOTES: One of the leaders not in the game Schell was talking about was team captain, Tyler Parfeniuk, who along with Walker Sidoni, missed the game due to sickness. Parfeniuk is hopeful to be back in the lineup for game five Thursday while Sidoni is most likely done for the playoffs. . . .The loss of Parfeniuk and Sidoni forced forward Cameron Dobransky back to the blue line core and allowed James Sorrey his first taste of the playoffs after being scratched from the first three games of the series. . . .Aaron Brewer left game in second period after taking a hit by Dallon Stoddart behind Castlegar net. . . .Nelson survived a two-man disadvantage in the second period. . . .Nelson lost the services of Nick Newman five minutes into the third after being checked to into the boards by Braydon Horcoff, who was given a five-minute major. Newman did return after being attended by the Leaf training staff. . . .Branden Amatto stopped 49 of 51 shots to lead the Spokane Braves to a 3-2 win over Beaver Valley Nitehawks. The Hawks lead the series 3-1 and can eliminate the Braves Thursday in Fruitvale.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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BCHL welcomes US-based Wenatchee Wild to league for 2015-16 season

first_img“The Wild will quickly develop rivalries with our existing franchises and I believe they will be a big draw in opposing buildings.”The Wild are no strangers to junior hockey, having been a member the North American Hockey League (NAHL) since the 2008-09 season, playing out of Wenatchee’s Town Toyota CenterDuring 2008, the Wild have had six players on their roster committed to National Collegiate Athletic Association Div. I programs.“We could not be more excited or humbled to be joining the BCHL,” said said head coach Bliss Littler, a native of Minot, N.D., is entering his 22nd year as a junior hockey coach.“Knowing the history and reputation of the league, be it sending players to play NCAA Division I hockey, NHL draft picks or the professionalism of the member teams and league have, we look forward to being a good league member on and off the ice.”As a U.S.-based club, the Wild will be allowed to roster a maximum of four Canadian players.BLUELINES: Trail Smoke Eaters completed its spring camp this past weekend at the Whistler Park Sports Centre in Whistler, BC. The team opens training camp in September for the 2015-16 season. . . .The BCHL will hold Bauer Showcase September 24-27 in Chilliwack at Prospera Centre. The BC Hockey League is getting another team — its 17th franchise starting with the 2015-16 season.The Wenatchee Wild was announced as the latest team to join the BCHL during a press conference Monday in the Washington State City.The franchise is the first American team in the BCHL since Bellingham Ice Hawks, operated from 1990 to 1995.“The BCHL is gaining a strong franchise in the Wenatchee Wild and we value the passion and professionalism they bring to our league,” said BCHL commissioner John Grisdale in a press release.last_img read more

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