Live postgame video: Warriors, Clippers react to stunning Game 2

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the video on a mobile deviceWatch the postgame reactions from the players and coaches following an unbelievable collapse by the Warriors as the Clippers came back from a 31-point deficit to beat Golden State Monday night.The Warriors seemingly had things in control after grabbing a 31-point lead in the second half only to watch the Clippers score 44 points in the third period to set the stage for their huge comeback victory. While …last_img

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SA congratulates South Sudan

first_img10 July 2012 President Jacob Zuma has congratulated South Sudan on the country’s first anniversary of independence, offering South Africa’s continued support for peace and development in the country even as relations with north Sudan remain fragile. South Sudan became the world’s newest country on 9 July 2011. Its birth was the culmination of a six-year peace process which helped bring an end to the long-running conflict between South Sudan and Sudan, of which it was formerly a part. Zuma said in a statement on Monday that South Africa would continue to support efforts to create an environment for the entrenchment of democracy and development of government institutions in South Sudan.Security, oil issues With one year having passed since the official declaration of South Sudan’s separation from north Sudan, the two countries so far seem to have failed to establish good neighbourly relations. Despite confirmation by the politicians of both sides to establish relations, recent events prove that the historical differences between the two sides are deeper than they appeared. The outstanding issues, including the sharing of revenues of oil, which is produced in the South and exported via north Sudan’s oil infrastructures and ports, were among the most prominent differences that prevented the establishment of normal ties between Khartoum and Juba. The oil dispute reached its peak when South Sudan decided on January 20 to stop pumping its crude oil, due to differences over the fees for exporting the South’s oil through Sudan’s ports. The decision had negative consequences for both economies, as Sudan lost three-quarters of its oil revenues, pushing the Sudanese government to adopt far-reaching economic reforms but causing a rise in prices of basic commodities that prompted demonstrations. Meanwhile, the citizens of South Sudan are suffering from lack of development and basic services together with high prices of basic commodities.‘Both sides struggling to adapt to separation’ The two countries almost slid into a comprehensive war when South Sudan’s army occupied Sudan’s oil-rich area of Heglig on 10 April. According to observers and analysts, the relationship between Khartoum and Juba will not return to normal unless the security and oil issues are resolved. Sudanese expert Mohamed Hassan Saeed says events following the separation of South Sudan have proved that the security issue is still a major threat to stable relations between the two countries, with the oil dispute adding further tension. “Full normalisation in the relations between Khartoum and Juba cannot be achieved without exploring a settlement for security issues between the two countries,” Saeed said. “The standing issues at the Blue Nile and South Kordofan areas as well as Abyei should be resolved first, and then the two sides can search for an agreement to restore pumping of the South’s oil through Sudan to meet the demands of the two country’s peoples. “Definitely, the current disputes are the outcome of the separation, because both countries are facing difficulty in adapting to the new situation,” Saeed said. “The South is suffering from difficulties of building a state from nothing under chronic tribal conflicts, scarcity of resources and lack of infrastructures, while Sudan is suffering from economic, security and political issues.”‘No choice but to work together’ Abdul-Azeem Ahmed, a Sudanese political analyst, believes that the two countries have no choice but to work to establish constructive relations based on common interests and mutual benefits. “Whatever the differences are, they will eventually resort to favouring cooperation and normalisation of relations, because that is the most realistic option,” Ahmed told news agency Xinhua. “It seems there is an urgent need to resolve the joint issues within a political framework, because both countries need stability and development,” Ahmed added. “They also need to create opportunities to change the negative feeling of regional isolation”. South Sudan was officially declared independent on 9 July 2011 in a celebration that was attended by around 30 African heads of state and representatives of regional and international organisations. The relationship between north and south Sudan witnessed continued tension for about two decades until the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) was signed between the two sides in January 2005 to end the longest civil war on the African continent. In accordance with the CPA, a referendum on self-determination for southern Sudan was conducted in January 2011, in which around 98 percent of southern Sudanese citizens voted for independence. Source: SANews.gov.za-Xinhualast_img read more

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Adrenaline-fueled Tenorio dedicates Finals MVP trophy to Helterbrand

first_imgTyphoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding GALLERY: Ginebra retains title, survives Meralco in Game 7 Read Next QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohortcenter_img View comments LATEST STORIES Tenorio said his elbow had bothered him for five years since his last year with Alaska in 2012 and it took sheer will for him to power through the pain in the packed Philippine Arena.“It was pure adrenaline, although I take painkillers and it’s the adrenaline that allows me to play through it,” said Tenorio who wore a sleeve on his right arm.Tenorio said the pain comes and goes but a bone spur had developed in his right elbow that the three-time champion knew he had to take medical help.ADVERTISEMENT Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 And yet it was Tenorio who dedicated his personal hardware to 41-year-old teammate Jayjay Helterbrand.“I want to dedicate this championship also to Jayjay,” said Tenorio in Filipino Friday at Philippine Arena after Ginebra wrapped up the series in Game 7, 101-96, against Meralco. “We talked and he’s still unsure of his plans after this.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“So I told him that we’ll get this one, Mark [Caguioa] will still be back next year.”And Tenorio finished with 26 points and four assists on his dedication game while nursing a hurting right elbow. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netLA Tenorio is no young star in the PBA.At 33-years-old, the Finals MVP of the PBA Governors’ Cup should be the one getting tributes from younger teammates.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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9 months agoSchar welcomes praise from Newcastle boss Benitez

first_imgSchar welcomes praise from Newcastle boss Benitezby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFabian Schar has welcomed praise from Newcastle United boss Rafa Benitez.Now fully fit, the Swiss defender has impressed since his return.On Benitez’s praise, Schar told Blick: “It’s nice to hear that. He knew before my commitment what I am as a player. “I have my strengths in the game with the ball. I’m still trying to force myself to improve day after day.”Schar went down with Deportivo La Coruna last season.He added: “I do not think about that. Of course, in England, compared to Spain, you have seven to eight teams playing against relegation. That is already extreme.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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a month agoTottenham boss Pochettino: This not the best squad I’ve had

first_imgTottenham boss Pochettino: This not the best squad I’ve hadby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino has had a dig at his players.After two transfer windows without signing a single player, Spurs returned to business this summer and secured the services of Ryan Sessegnon, Giovani Lo Celso, Tanguy Ndomele and Jack Clarke.And although only a handful of key players left, with Kieran Trippier and Fernando Llorente moving on, Pochettino remains unsure just how good the side can be.”We will see at the end of the season. At the moment I don’t believe this is the best squad,” Pochettino said.”But I think if you only see the results, playing in the final of the Champions League, it’s easy to say the better squad was last season’s squad because we got to the final.”We will see if we can repeat, or if we win some trophy maybe we can talk about this being the best squad.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Bombay HC quashes orders attaching NSEL assets

first_imgMumbai: In a major victory for fintech firm 63 moons, the Bombay High Court on Thursday ruled that the National Spot Exchange Ltd (NSEL) is not a financial institution and hence notifications for attachment of the company’s assets, including bank accounts and properties, under the MPID Act stand quashed. The court also declined to stay its order as was requested by the Economic Offences Wing (EoW) of Mumbai Police. “We have considered the arguments of the learned senior counsel appearing on both sides and we are of the express view that on exhaustive discussion, we have already concluded that NSEL is not an ‘financial establishment’ within the purview of the Maharashtra Protection of Interests of Depositors (MPID) in Financial Establishments Act, 1999, and in such circumstances, we decline the prayer made by the learned senior counsel (Rafique) Dada,” the order said. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalIn a statement, the company said: “The Bombay High Court has quashed all the notifications issued by the State Government in the year 2016 and 2018 attaching movable and immovable properties of 63 moons under the MPID Act 1999, by observing that NSEL is not a financial establishment since it did not accept any deposits as defined under the MPID Act and resultantly, the petitioner who is a promoter of the said establishment cannot be proceeded under the provisions of MPID Act.” Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostAccording to the company, the court noted that despite the forensic audit commissioned by the EOW tracing the entire money trail to the defaulters, the State attached properties of 63 moons which was not legally sustainable. The two-judge bench of Bharati H. Dangre and Ranjit More on Thursday ruled that the Act is not applicable in terms of NSEL as it is not a financial institution. As a result of the order, the assets attached under MPID Act would be released. The company said that it is in the business of developing and selling technology products for facilitating trading on exchanges such as stock and commodity exchanges and claims to have more than 63,000 shareholders and over 800 employees.last_img read more

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SCREENWRITERS CAN PLAY KEY ROLE IN GENDER PARITY ACTORS SAY

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook LOS ANGELES — Academy Award-winning actor Geena Davis says achieving gender parity on screen is simple, and it could happen overnight.“Just go through (the script) and cross out a bunch of male first names and put female first names. That’s all you have to do,” Davis told the audience during a panel Saturday at AT&T’s SHAPE media conference in the Los Angeles suburb of Burbank.Davis joined fellow actor Mayim Bialik on stage at the conference to discuss how gender parity in media can create social change. The conversation revolved around the need for diversity on screen to break stereotypes and encourage young people to pursue careers they might otherwise have felt were off limits to them. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Geena Davis speaks at the AT&T’s SHAPE: ‘The Scully Effect is Real’ panel with Geena Davis and Mayim Bialik on Saturday, June 22, 2019 in Burbank, Calif. (Photo by Mark VonHolden/Invision/AP) Advertisementcenter_img Twitter Login/Register With: Advertisement “Of course, why wouldn’t we need to see people who are like us to be able to imagine what we could become?” Bialik said.The panel was born from a study conducted by the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media that found women felt encouraged to pursue scientific, medical and engineering (STEM) careers because of “X-Files” character Dana Scully, an FBI agent and medical doctor. Of the women surveyed in the study, 63 per cent of those working in a STEM field said Scully served as a role model for them growing up.Bialik, who also holds a doctorate in neuroscience and recently wrapped her time playing the role of neuroscientist Amy Farrah Fowler on “The Big Bang Theory,” said seeing characters like Scully on screen and having real-life mentors is crucial for young women to pursue careers in science, medicine and engineering.“I was raised in a climate where if you didn’t learn things as fast as the boys, it meant that it wasn’t for you,” Bialik said. It’s important “to have a mentor, to have someone that you can see is living the life of a scientist and also has a social life — all the things that the lone scientist in the laboratory stereotype doesn’t give us.”“You’re seeing the full, complicated, amazing woman living life as a scientist,” Bialik said of characters like Scully and Fowler. “That’s what I needed as a young girl that wasn’t there for me.”This doesn’t just apply for gender, either. The panelists said that all forms of diversity on screen are necessary, pointing to films like “Hidden Figures,” which is about the key role a group of African-American women played in the U.S. space program, as leading the way for more complex stories on people of any gender or race.“As much as people think Hollywood is liberal and open-minded and progressive thinking, they’re doing a worse job of reflecting society than the abysmal numbers in real life,” Davis said. “If we show it, it will happen in real life.”Katie Campione ~ The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Atleo Harper offer opposing visions on need to scrap Indian Act

first_img(Protestors from Six Nations, Ont., and Barriere Lake, Que., demonstrate oustide the Crown-First Nations Gathering in Ottawa Tuesday. APTN/Photo)APTN National NewsOTTAWA–In speeches to open the Crown-First Nations Gathering in Ottawa Tuesday, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo painted starkly differently visions of the paths ahead for Canada and its Indigenous population.Their two speeches diverged significantly over the issue of the Indian Act.While Harper called the Indian Act a tree with roots too deep to be uprooted at the moment, Atleo compared the 136 year-old legislation to a boulder blocking the path of First Nations.Harper said his government had no plans to scrap the Indian Act, choosing instead to find “creative ways” to work within and outside the over century-old legislation.“Our government has no grand scheme to repeal or unilaterally re-write the Indian Act. After 136 years, that tree has deep roots. Blowing up the stump would just leave a big hole,” said Harper.Atleo, however, said the legislation needed scrapping because it was “a painful obstacle to re-establishing any form of meaningful partnership. Atleo said the legislation, enacted in 1876, was a “complete abrogation” in the partnership between First Nations and Canada.“Like a rock that sits in the middle of the road, a boulder that blocks the path of collaboration, remains the Indian Act,” said Atleo. “Along with the age-old structures and policies that administer it and steadfastly resist change.”Their speeches also diverged on the pace needed for change.Harper spoke of incremental change.“There are ways, creative ways, collaborative ways, ways that involve consultation between our government, the provinces and First Nations leadership and communities,” said Harper. “Ways that provide options within the Act, or outside of it, for practical, incremental and real change.”Atleo spoke of urgency.“We need only to look at Attawapiskat, Marten Falls, Pikangikum and St. Theresa Point, among dozens of other communities, on reserve or in our cities, to see the impact of broken promises, the pain of broken lives, the tragedy of lost opportunity,” said Atleo. “Our people cannot wait.”Both leaders, however, said they believed Canada and First Nations had reached a new stage in their relationship.Harper declared a “new day” had dawned.“In past conversations, we have talked about symbolism and respect and trust. Certainly in the past lack of trust on both sides has held us back,” said Harper. “But this is a new day.”Atleo said the relationship had reached a “historic” moment.“Today must mark the beginning of renewal, the beginning of realizing our shared potential foretold in the visions of our ancestors,” said Atleo. “The step we take today, recalling the words of my late grandmother, and ability to see one another, is the first step,”The two leaders also highlighted the damage Canada had done to First Nations.Harper said Canada’s relationship with First Nations had been tainted by events like the Indian residential school system which was “an explicit attempt to destroy Aboriginal culture.”The prime minister said one of his “most rewarding days in office” was when he delivered the government’s apology for residential schools in the House of Commons in 2008.“Every relationship has its ups and downs, moments of consensus and of disagreement,” said Harper. “I believe it is important to build a narrative of any relationship based on its highest points.”Atleo said the damage inflicted on First Nations have left many First Nations sceptical of any goodwill the federal government may offer.“I understand those feelings, I respect that scepticism. It would be disrespectful of the suffering of our peoples over two centuries of agreements follows by broken promises,” said Atleo. “It is well past time that we began to undo the damage of the (Indian)Act…From it grew the reserve system, the tragedy of residential schools and offensive prohibitions on our cultural and spiritual practices, a breach of faith that has devastated families and communities ever since.”Harper, however, stuck to the theme he had developed in media interviews in the run-up to the gathering saying that his government was focused on incremental steps, not grand leaps.Harper said his government would continue with the so-called Joint Action Plan with the Assembly of First Nations which targets education, economic development, accountability and treaty relationships.“We have only just begun,” said Harper.Atleo continued his theme to “smash this status-quo” and propel First Nations people into a new realm.“Our people can make an enormous contribution to Canada if we tackle these obstacles,” said Atleo. “Next must come new fiscal relationships…We struggle under layer upon layer of wasteful bureaucratic interference, useless and expensive controls are piled upon our people squandering tax dollars and frustrating change.”last_img read more

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Language Keeper The last fluent speaker of Stólōs Indigenous dialect in race

first_imgAudio Playerhttp://aptn.ca/news/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2016/07/Elizabethspeaking.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Above: Phillips speaks the phrase “simple language for beginners” in Upriver HalkomelemIt seems like yesterday to Phillips that a group of Stó:lō elders would gather to speak Upriver Halkomelem and record what they knew in a dictionary. It was a time when she could have long conversations on the phone with friends without speaking a word of English.But those elders’ deaths came in rapid succession – more than 20 in the last two decades.Those elders were all a decade or two older than Phillips, who was always the youngest one in language groups, but she got invited to attend before she was an elder because of her unique ability to speak fluently even after residential school.Several years ago, an elder named Elizabeth Herrling who was working to record the language in stories died at 93, which is when Phillips stepped up her work to record it.Above: a torch lighting story told by HerrlingSadly, Phillips is now left with no one to have real conversations with, but she still thinks in Halkomelem and communicates as much as she can with speakers who are learning, including her daughter Vivian.“I try my best not to lose it, because I can’t have conversation,” she says.“But I text in Halkomelem.”Phillips pauses, then bursts into laughter at the notion.“The phone is always trying to correct me!”Strang Burton, a linguist, and Phillips sit outside of the elders home.PreservationMost of the languages probably are going to come to a place where people aren’t speaking them fluently.”– Strang Burton, linguistJoining in on her laughter is Strang Burton, who works for the Sto:lo Shxweli language program and UBC’s linguistics department.Phillips and Burton have been working together for nearly two decades and they switch easily between having serious, quiet conversations and laughing jovially together. Burton calls her “Siem,” a Halkomelem word that, in English, loosely means “respected one.”Together, they’ve recorded many stories and other language material. Burton got the idea to do a language ultrasound on Phillips when he saw other linguists using the equipment on Mandarin and Japanese.“I thought, well, let’s do it for Halkomelem, because people were having trouble with the sounds of Halkomelem,” he says.Burton believes it to be the first time the technology has ever been used on an Indigenous language in Canada.He said he hopes it will allow people who are teaching the language in local schools to improve their pronunciation of the language, which is notoriously tricky.He plans to impose the ultrasound images with external videos he’s taking of Phillips’s mouth so that others can see how her mouth and tongue move as she’s speaking. cmckenna@aptn.ca@CaraMcK Linguists record ultrasound video of Phillips speaking.But, after decades of work, Burton is realistic about the prospects of a severely endangered language like Upriver Halkomelem truly being saved.“Most of the languages probably are going to come into a situation where people aren’t speaking them fluently,” he says. Time is Ticking“For people to become really fluent again, that requires something social to happen.”– Strang BurtonThe reality in British Columbia is a bleak one – the province is home to more than half of Canada’s 60-odd Aboriginal languages, and almost all of them are in danger of disappearing.The languages are a crucial part of culture, ceremony and connection. Many Indigenous words can’t be translated accurately into English.In the Canadian Liberal government’s first federal budget earlier this year, it was announced that $5 million per year would be siphoned into supporting the country’s Indigenous languages, in comparison to more than $2 billion for French.“Considering the number of First Nations languages there are in Canada, it’s not a lot,” Burton says.“If there were just one First Nations language in Canada, I guess that would be a lot.”More funding is certainly needed to continue crucial work to preserve languages, but Burton says, more than that, fluent speakers like Phillips are needed to pass the languages along. And they’re dying off at a worrisome rate.“For people to become really fluent again, that requires something social to happen,” Burton says.“Which is happening maybe a little bit.”But the small changes are not enough. Burton says, what is realistic, is that people can experience the language through stories about people’s lives and traditional practices. That’s what he’s trying to do through his current work with Phillips and previous work with other elders.“Without a Native speaker to go to for subtle translations and things, you’re never going to be sure you’ve got it exactly right,” he says.“But with the resources we have, probably if people get together and they want to speak, there’s enough stuff that they could access in the archives to help them have a real conversation.”center_img An outside view of Phillips’s home.Burton believes the community is positive, and he has seen many children learning the language through school programs, which is hopeful to Phillips.Many years ago, before Phillips’s own mother passed away, she asked her daughter Vivian to live with her, which has helped her to become proficient in the language and pass it down to her own children.“That’s quite an honour because that was so forbidden, you know,” she says.“A lot of our people were punished because they spoke their language.”It’s a painful subject to breach, and Phillips gets distracted mid-thought when she notices an eagle flying above her. She smiles at the reminder of strength and power.“They always seem to know what’s going on,” she says. Elizabeth Phillips reads aloud words in her Indigenous language.Cara McKenna APTN National NewsThe Stó:lō people are named in their language after the Fraser River, which is the community’s lifeblood and flows through their picturesque territory southeast of Vancouver, B.C.Just a few generations ago, dozens of people spoke the nation’s language of Upriver Halkomelem.But in the last decade, almost all fluent speakers have died.There is just one elder left who early in life had to fight to keep her language, and is now trying to pass it on before it’s too late.The Knowledge HolderI try my best not to lose [my language], because I can’t have a conversation.”– Elizabeth Phillips, Stó:lō elderWhen Elizabeth Phillips was a child, she was put into St. Mary’s Indian Residential School in Mission. She was forbidden to speak the language that both of her parents spoke to her as a baby.Phillips was a loner at the school and supervising nuns became concerned that she wasn’t associating with other children enough.While other children played, she would stand alone at the outside gate, staring out at the Fraser River and thinking in her language.“And I guess that’s what saved me,” she says now, sitting outside her home in the Fraser Valley.Phillips’s small red house stands in stark contrast to rolling green hills and clear blue sky. Nearby is the Fraser.‎Part of Sto:lo Nation’s traditional territory near Chilliwack, B.C.Inside, three linguists from the University of British Columbia are bustling around her kitchen and setting up an array of ultrasound equipment as Phillips observes the elaborate set up.Phillips laughs good-heartedly when one of the linguists explains that she’ll need to put some goopy ultrasound gel under her chin.It might be the first time anyone has done an ultrasound on her mouth, but the experience of being recorded by academics is not a new one for Phillips.At 77, she’s the last known fluent speaker of the Stó:lō Nation’s Upriver Halkomelem language (also called Halq’eméylem) – a Salish dialect that’s related to two other Halkomelem dialects, but distinct to the Stó:lō people.last_img read more

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DHX Media signs deal to sell Halifax animation studio terms not disclosed

first_imgHALIFAX – DHX Media Ltd. has signed a deal to sell its Halifax animation studio to IoM Media Ventures.Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.DHX says the sale is part of its ongoing strategic shift to focus and streamline its production operations.The children’s entertainment company noted the sale does not include This Hour Has 22 Minutes, which continues to be owned by DHX Media and produced in Halifax.The sale is expected to close by the end of the year, subject to customary closing conditions.DHX completed a strategic review earlier this year that ended with a deal to boost distribution and sales of its Peanuts brand in China and elsewhere in Asia. The company also suspended its dividend, cut staff and streamlined operations.Companies in this story: (TSX:DHX)last_img read more

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