Gilas cautious vs ‘wounded’ Aussies

first_imgGilas Pilipinas vs Australia. Photo from Fiba.comBOCAUE,Bulacan—With all hands on deck this time and momentum on its side, Gilas Pilipinas tries to pull off what seemed unthinkable ever since the draw in the Fiba World Cup 2019 Qualifiers was finalized last year.Coming off an ego-inflating win over a bitter rival in the Asian region just three nights ago, Gilas will set out against world power Australia Monday evening at the cavernous Philippine Arena here.ADVERTISEMENT Christopher Tolkien, son of Lord of the Rings author, dies aged 95 Bicol riders extend help to Taal evacuees Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Harvey Weinstein rape trial Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Hands-down the team-to-beat in this tournament, Australia took a 79-78 loss at the hands of Japan in Chiba on Friday after the Japanese unveiled two new players in naturalized center Nick Fazekas and half-Japanese Rui Hachimura.The loss to the Japanese is what makes Philippine Team coach Chot Reyes a bit wary of the Aussies.“For sure, they (Aussies) will come out like wounded tigers (for our game),” Reyes said after the victory over the Taiwanese.June Mar Fajardo will be coming off what could possibly be his best game in a Gilas uniform and Andray Blatche redeemed himself from a mediocre outing in the previous win over Chinese Taipei as the duo will definitely be called upon to try and deny the big Aussies from dominating the inside.Reyes also wants premium on making outside shots to enable the Gilas big men to operate inside.  That’s where Castro, Romeo and Matthew Wright come as the Filipinos’ best outside guns.ADVERTISEMENT In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Taal victims get help from Kalayaan town They will try to beat the world No. 10 Aussies for the first time in the modern age in a match that will determine top Group B ranking.The Philippines’ nipped Australia, 101-100, in the 1974 world championships held in Puerto Rico.  Among the players of that team were pro legends Bogs Adornado, Ramon Fernandez and Robert Jaworski.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownJayson Castro and Terrence Romeo, spitfirish guards who weren’t around when the Filipinos were manhandled 84-68 by the Boomers last February, will be suiting up in the 7:30 p.m. contest as Gilas tries to pin a second straight defeat on the pre-tournament favorites.Coach Chot Reyes made adjustments in his roster and will play Carl Bryan Cruz and Baser Amer against the Aussies, the two having sat out Friday night’s 93-71 mangling of the Taiwanese in Chinese Taipei. LATEST STORIES View comments MOST READ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew BanKo-Pocari duel nears In the loss to Australia last Feb. 22, the Philippines made just 5 of 19 three-point shots. In the Friday win against the Taiwanese, the Filipinos were a little better at 8-for-21.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Cloudy skies over Luzon due to amihanlast_img read more

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Novel delivery system for bacteriophages could offer new way to battle lung

first_imgJul 17 2018A new delivery system for bacteriophages-;viruses that selectively attack harmful bacteria-;could help give doctors a new way to battle lung infections that threaten older patients and people with cystic fibrosis.Phage therapy is a promising alternative to antibiotics because it attacks specific pathogens, does not harm the body’s normal contingent of bacteria and won’t contribute to multi-drug resistance. However, therapeutic bacteriophages can be difficult to purify and challenging to deliver to the site of an infection, especially when that location is the lungs.A research team headed by the Georgia Institute of Technology has demonstrated a new delivery technique that uses dry, porous microparticles coated with phages. In animal testing, the phage-coated polymer particles successfully treated pneumonia in infected mice and dramatically reduced bacterial levels in an animal model of cystic fibrosis. The technique might one day allow delivery of the dry-powder phage using a device similar to a common inhaler.Reported July 16 in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, the research was supported by the National Institutes of Health and The Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Pediatric Technology Center, a partnership between Georgia Tech and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.”Phage delivery is an area where the right type of material could make a difference in therapeutic applications,” said Andrés García, the Rae S. and Frank H. Neely Chair and Regents’ Professor in Georgia Tech’s George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. “We set out to engineer a biomaterial carrier that would keep the phage active while delivering them deep into the lungs in a uniform fashion. This is a key step in moving this potential therapy forward.”Phage therapy has generated more interest as concerns about antibiotic use has grown. Specific bacteriophages can target bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa – which causes some forms of pneumonia and is the major pathogenic bacteria in cystic fibrosis – without affecting other bacteria. Phage activity propagates beyond the coated particles, but is limited by the host population, so once the targeted bacteria are eliminated, the phage disappear.Researchers have previously used a nebulizer to deliver wet phage mixtures to the lungs, but that approach is inefficient and inconvenient for patients. As an alternative, García and his collaborators developed a microparticle carrier made from the same polymer material used in dissolving sutures. They made the porous particles large enough to avoid rapid clearance by the body, but light enough to be delivered deep into the lungs.The phage are incubated on the particles, then dried. When introduced into animal lungs as a puff of dry powder, the phage begin attacking the bacteria. For mice infected with pneumonia, the phage carried on the particles cleared the infection – while untreated mice died. A significant reduction in bacterial populations was observed in transgenic mice whose lungs simulated conditions typical of cystic fibrosis.Related StoriesNew research could help design algae that produces fuels and cleanup chemicalsNew methods to recognize antimicrobial resistant bacteria and how they workNon-pathogenic bacteria engineered as Trojan Horse to treat tumors from within”When we immobilized the phage on the particles, we could retain good activity for days – as long as two weeks at room temperature,” García said. “We could store these particles, and when we delivered them to mice, get good distribution through the lungs. We believe the particles help stabilize the phage and improve the distribution in the lungs.”Nael McCarty, Marcus Professor of Cystic Fibrosis and director of the Emory+Children’s Cystic Fibrosis Center of Excellence at Emory University and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, and one of the study’s co-authors, said the development of the delivery technique potentially advances the use of phage in treatment of cystic fibrosis.”Cystic fibrosis is a common, life-limiting genetic disorder that affects many organ systems, but the most important impact on human health is chronic infections of the lung. Bacterial pneumonia that is resistant to multiple drugs is a challenge we must deal with frequently with cystic fibrosis,” he said. “Treatment with antibiotics often makes space for other opportunistic bacteria to take hold. Phage therapy could complement existing therapies without worsening antibiotic resistance. The technique developed and tested through this important collaboration could address one of the major challenges we have with phage therapy, which is delivery.”The phage-coated microparticles were more effective at clearing bacteria than dried phage particles by themselves. The polymer material is biodegradable and was cleared from the animals within a few days. The technique was successful in attacking different strains of bacteria within biofilms, and the researchers did not see evidence that the bacteria were developing resistance.Though the phage aren’t believed to attack mammalian cells, they can create an immune system response, and produce a toxins that can be harmful. They are grown in cultures containing the bacteria they attack, so separating them at the purity levels required is another challenge.Among the next steps are to test the particle-delivery technique in larger animals and against mixtures of bacteria, which often infect humans. The technique must also be tested against chronic infections, which often are seen in persons with cystic fibrosis.Source: http://www.news.gatech.edu/last_img read more

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