Final destination – Cornwall defeat Clarendon 2-1 for first final appearance since 2001

first_img It was overall a disappointing display from Clarendon, with little urgency shown in the final third. They had three attempts on target in the first half, with Charlton coming agonisingly close in the 15th minute. Then in the 31st minute, the Clarendon aggregation had a shout for penalty ignored by referee Danion Parchment, as the ball cannoned off a Cornwall player inside the area. Clarendon College’s team manager, Richard Palmer, attributed the loss partly to referee’s decisions, which, he said, never went his team’s way. “We are just disappointed that the penalty was not given. It was plain that the player handled the ball inside the area, but we are happy to have come this far but regret that the journey had to end like this,” Palmer said. Cornwall’s opponents in the final will be known this afternoon when defending champions St Elizabeth Technical tackle Lennon High at the Manchester High School ground at 2:30 p.m. POOR DISPLAY WESTERN BUREAU: Cornwall College reached their first daCosta Cup final in 15 years when they clipped Clarendon College 2-1 in the ISSA-FLOW semi-final yesterday at St Elizabeth Technical Giovanni Reid and Aiden Jkombo were on target for Cornwall, who had to withstand a late charge from Clarendon, during which time Creggton Charlton managed to score. Playing without the influence of Peter-Lee Vassell, who later entered the fray as a second-half substitute, and with Jourdaine Fletcher not yet warmed to the occasion, it was left to Reid to provide Cornwall’s first threat. He was first to meet a Fletcher corner-kick, outjumping the Clarendon defenders around him to flash a powerful header into the net in the sixth minute. But when Charlton, who looked dangerous, particularly in the first half, was allowed to sneak a cross that was drilled into the area to equalise in the 85th minute, many thought the game would again go to the wire. But then in the 87th minute, the supremely talented Vassell took charge. He darted into the area, drawing the attention of two Clarendon College defenders, and when he was challenged, the ball ran loose to Jkomba, who beat Benjamin Williams in the Clarendon goal. It was a fine victory for Cornwall as they marked a wonderful campaign without a defeat in the daCosta Cup. They have only lost twice all season, once to Lennon in the Ben Francis Cup and to Wolmer’s Boys in the FLOW Super Cup final. “The match went according to plan except for the Clarendon College late goal, but we showed determination to score late on ourselves to clinch a good win,” Dr Dean Weatherly, Cornwall College head coach, said.last_img read more

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‘Lawyers Caught in Jury Tampering Will Be Jailed’

first_img— Judge Nancy Sammy threatensIn her efforts to regain public confidence in the Judicial Branch, the assigned Criminal Court ‘C’ Judge Nancy Sammy has threatened to imprison any lawyer that would contact a potential juror and attempt to influence the juror’s thoughts about how a case before her should end.Judge Sammy’s strongly worded statement comes in the face of public concern that most of the cases tried by jury at that court have usually ended at the Supreme Court as a result of alleged jury tampering, an accusation which has created a dark cloud over the image of the country’s justice system.Jury tampering, a legal expert explained to the Daily Observer,  is the crime of attempting to influence a jury through other means than the evidence presented in court, such as conversations about the case outside the court, offering bribes, making threats or asking acquaintances to interfere with a juror.“A person commits the crime of jury tampering if, with intent to influence a juror’s vote, opinion, decision or other action in the case, he attempts directly or indirectly to communicate with a juror other than as part of the proceedings in the trial of the case,” the expert noted.However, Judge Sammy, who is the first female to preside over the Criminal Court ‘C’ warned that lawyers who will be practicing before her court, Criminal Court ‘C’, should be mindful that she would not tolerate any attempt at jury tampering.The criminal court judge further warned that “if any of you lawyers engage in jury tempering and you are caught, be assured that you will not go scot-free”, she added, “because we will ensure that you be drastically dealt with in conformity with the law, so be warned.”The Criminal Court ‘C’ is one of the courts that has been plagued with charges of  jury tampering and where the Supreme Court has been constrained to disband those jurors based on jury tampering.One of the cases is that which involved former Managing Director of the National Port Authority (NPA), Matilda Parker and her Comptroller Christina Paelay, in which Associate Justice Jamesetta Wolokolie, then Chamber Justice, was constrained to disband the jury due to accusation of jury tampering.In that case, the government lawyers charged that jurors in the case were tampered with, following the discovery of a letter that was addressed to two of the sequestrated jurors, Melvin Neowan and Kebbeh Kollie. The two jurors denied the allegation.However, Parker and Paelay managed to win the charges against them due to government’s continued failure to try the matter.It is against this backdrop that Judge Sammy vowed not to tolerate any attempt of jury tampering by lawyers practicing before her court.Judge Sammy highlighted these concerns when she recently delivered her charge during the opening of the November 2019 Term of Criminal Courts, A, B, C and D for Montserrado County.During her deliberation, Judge Sammy said: “Some politicians might try to use our courts as platforms to promote themselves by interfering in judicial decisions, and so you have to take judicial notice of that fact.”Judge Sammy reminded her colleagues that they should not allow themselves to be pressured, coerced, or to let their courts to be used as a platform by politicians to promote themselves, stressing, “Please do not allow any politician to interfere in judicial decisions you will make.”However, she said that if cases are brought before them as judges that would cause conflict of interest, then in such situation, she advised, “the most appropriate thing to do is to recuse yourself as a sitting judge from hearing such cases.”She said that it is important to do so, “because as dispensers of justice, we cannot allow ourselves to be caught in situations that would embarrass us and the entire judiciary.”The female judge (Sammy) then noted that though she and others are relatively new to the judgeship, “a core value we have upheld is to resist outside influence, and to be prompt and expeditious in handling matters that come  before us.”In a nutshell, she maintained, “we shall work diligently during this term to ensure that the law takes its course in clear, precision-driven terms and in a fearless manner.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) – Advertisement – Criminal Court ‘C’ Judge Judge Nancy Sammy last_img read more

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