Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Siding

first_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Should vinyl building materials be banned from green homes? Some environmentalists think so. There seem to be three categories of building materials that particularly irk the anti-PVC crowd: vinyl siding, vinyl windows, and vinyl flooring. Since there are alternatives to all of these materials, these environmentalists argue, green homes shouldn’t include any of them. (Although the anti-vinyl group sometimes mentions PVC pipe used for drains and vents, it seems that neither plastic pipe nor the vinyl insulation on Romex wiring raises as many hackles as vinyl siding, windows, and flooring.)Vinyl-framed windows now outsell windows with wooden frames, aluminum frames, or fiberglass frames. Moreover, in many areas of the country, vinyl siding outsells all other types of residential cladding, and PVC is by far the most common material used to manufacture residential drain pipes. While these facts probably distress anti-vinyl crusaders, they provide evidence that these vinyl building products outperform competing products in some ways. Vinyl building products fill a niche. Vinyl is durable, weather-resistant, low-maintenance, and affordable.The anti-vinyl position rests on several arguments:All of the above arguments have been used by anti-vinyl groups. Some of the points are indisputable, while others are debatable. On some points, evidence points to an opposite conclusion than the one reached by anti-vinyl crusaders. On other points, the evidence is inconclusive, and more research is needed before we can reach firm conclusions.For a good background on the issues surrounding the PVC debate, I recommend an Environmental Building News article written in 1994 by Nadav Malin and Alex Wilson, “Should We Phase Out PVC?”Environmental Building News revisited the topic in Februrary 2014, when it published “The PVC Debate: A Fresh Look.”Environmental life-cycle assessments attempt to weigh all of the pluses and minuses of building materials so that one product can be… center_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log inlast_img read more

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On Always In Sales

first_img Get the Free eBook! Want to master cold calling? Download my free eBook! Many would have you believe that cold calling is dead, but the successful have no fear of the phone; they use it to outproduce their competitors. Download Now Oh, you didn’t think yesterday’s post was about sales? Here is more about sometimes and always.If you sometimes make your calls, do your prospecting, or nurture your dream clients, you might sometimes produce a result. But those results will mirror your efforts—they’ll be sporadic.Always is the better choice.If you sometimes work to get in front of opportunities, to build value throughout the process, and to create the greatest value for your prospects, you will win—sometimes. But sometimes won’t be enough.Always is the better decision.If you sometimes create a compelling, differentiated value proposition that provides your client with the business case, the return on investment, and the risk avoidance they need, you will sometimes win.Always is more effective.If you sometimes follow up, follow through, and keep your commitments, you won’t do well—even sometimes. You’ll betray confidence and destroy trust.Always is the answer to trust and confidence.Sometimes you will be overwhelmed. Sometimes you will fall ill. Sometimes you will fall short. Sometimes you will completely blow it.But you can always do your very best in that moment.last_img read more

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10 months agoCrystal Palace boss Hodgson: Zaha and China?

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Crystal Palace boss Hodgson: Zaha and China?by Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCrystal Palace boss Roy Hodgson insists there’s been no offer from China for Wilfried Zaha.Hodgson has claimed Crystal Palace know nothing about a Chinese mega-money offer for Zaha in the January window.And Hodgson said: “The speculation we have had so far I have got to say I find it hard to take seriously but who knows? Perhaps I shall be very surprised.“I don’t know if you sign a new five-year contract in the Premier League and then go to China at the age of 26. But who knows? Perhaps I am naïve. Perhaps it does happen.”All I do know is that no-one at the club knows anything at all about this story.” last_img read more

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3 days agoArsenal boss Emery upset with Pepe: You must score!

first_imgArsenal boss Emery upset with Pepe: You must score!by Paul Vegas3 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal boss Unai Emery was upset with Nicolas Pepe after defeat at Sheffield United last night.The Gunners’ £72million summer signing missed a sitter when the game was goalless – and is yet to score from open play for his new club.Lys Mousset then struck for the brilliant Blades, as Arsenal, who have never won at Sheffield United in the Premier League in four attempts, missed the chance to go third.Gunners boss Emery moaned: “The chance for us, for Pepe, was the key.“Because if they score the first goal, defensively they are a very strong team.“Pepe is improving but the next step for him is to score.“Usually he is going to score chances like that – but tonight he didn’t take his chance.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Identities of two Mikmaq Warriors on RCMP threat list revealed

first_img(Suzanne Patles was arrested and charged with mischief on July 9, 2013, after laying tobacco and praying the middle of a highway in New Brunswick during an anti-shale gas exploration demonstration. Photo/Suzanne Patles Faceboook)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsAPTN National News has identified two of the individuals on a list of 89 Indigenous rights activists considered “threats” by the RCMP following a review of details contained in a recently released report compiled by the federal police force’s intelligence centre.The RCMP’s National Intelligence Coordination Centre compiled the list of Indigenous rights activists who posed potential “threats” during Indigenous rights demonstrations as part of an operation dubbed Project SITKA which aimed to enhance the federal police force’s intelligence gathering capacity, according to a report obtained under the Access to Information Act by two Ottawa-based researchers.While the names of the individuals on the list of 89 are redacted in the publicly released version of the Project SITKA report, several key details about possible identities managed to survive the censors.Based on these details and previous reporting on the issue, APTN can report on the identity of two of the individuals on the Project SITKA list. They are Suzanne Patles, a mother of three children who lives in Eskasoni First Nation in Nova Scotia, and Coady Stevens, who is originally from Eskasoni but lives in We’koqma’q First Nation, which is on Cape Breton Island also in Nova Scotia. Stevens is also a father but does not want to publicly reveal the number of his children because he has faced death threats in the past. Both are members of the Mi’kmaq Warrior Society and were arrested and charged during anti-shale gas demonstrations in Elsipogtog in 2013.“I guess you wear it like a badge of pride. You know you are doing your job right if you are on a government watch list,” said Patles, in a telephone interview from Eskasoni. “It is kind of complicated. Yes, you are being monitored, you are being watched. It is amusing, but at the same time it’s kind of scary because everything you do is being monitored.”Stevens said he feels a bit “nervous” knowing the RCMP put him on the list, but it comes as no surprise.“All the work that I have done must be getting somewhere if I am on the watch list,” said Stevens, in a telephone interview from We’koqma’q. “I see a lot of the social conditions in the community and the bad things happening to our people. Most of the things I do is for the children and the next generation. I try to do work to make their lives better than the lives of this generation.”Coady Stevens in a Facebook photo from March 26.The RCMP’s Project SITKA was launched in early 2014 to identify individuals “willing and capable of utilizing unlawful tactics” during Indigenous rights demonstrations,” according to the intelligence report which was  obtained by Andy Crosby, an Ottawa-based researcher, and Jeffery Monaghan, an assistant criminology professor at Carleton University.The National Intelligence Coordination Centre initially created a list of 313 individuals who posed a potential “criminal threat to Aboriginal public order events.” The list was then reduced to 89 individuals, both non-Indigenous and Indigenous, that met the RCMP’s criteria which was based on background, motivation and rhetoric “to have committed or commit criminal activities” in connection with Indigenous rights demonstrations.The intelligence centre’s report breaks down the list of 89 by regions. Thirty-five of the 89 individuals who made the list were from New Brunswick. British Columbia was next with 16 people, followed by Ontario with 15, Manitoba with 11, Nova Scotia with 10, one from Saskatchewan and one from Prince Edward Island.The high number of individuals on the RCMP list from New Brunswick was primarily the result of the months-long demonstrations against shale gas exploration near Elsipogtog First Nation in 2013. The demonstrations saw heavily armed RCMP tactical units raid a camp, clashes between community members and police, burning police cars and highways blocked by flaming tires. The Mi’kmaq-led fight against the exploration, which they feared would lead to hydraulic fracturing and a poisoning of the area’s water, played a role in the eventual toppling of the Tory provincial government by a Liberal opposition that promised a moratorium on shale gas exploration.The Project SITKA report said a core group of members of the Mi’kmaq Warrior Society travelled to Elsipogtog from Nova Scotia.The report notes that “two individuals, both from Nova Scotia and who identified as part of the Mi’kmaq Warrior Society, participated in a national speaking tour” in 2014. The report identifies those two individuals as being “within the project,” meaning they were on the list of threats. The report notes the speaking tour was organized by the Council of Canadians and another individual from British Columbia who is also on the RCMP’s threat list.Patles and Stevens embarked on a speaking tour about the shale gas demonstrations in 2014 organized by the Council of Canadians and Harsha Walia, a migrant justice activist and author who is affiliated with No One is Illegal. Their tour stops matched the places described in the RCMP report.Suzanne Patles and Coady Stevens during one of their speaking tour stops in B.C. on Jan. 24, 2014. Photo//Facebook Dave GoodswimmerPatles was in the thick of the battle against shale gas exploration throughout most of the summer and fall of 2013 and she became one of the Warrior Society’s more high profile spokespeople. She was arrested three times. Patles was first arrested and charged with mischief on July 9, 2013, after laying tobacco and praying the middle of a highway. Then, on July 28, 2013, she was arrested and charged for obstruction, breaching conditions and mischief after the RCMP alleged she was involved in planning a blockade in the woods where several women chained themselves to machinery. Her last arrest came Oct. 17, 2013, during the RCMP raid on an encampment blocking shale gas exploration vehicles.Patles said she never went to trial on any of the charges. She said her charges were dropped.“It was entirely all worth it and I’d do it all again in a heartbeat, and I think we were successful in our endeavour, we were able to stop hydraulic fracturing in the province,” said Patles. “And we sent off sparks all across the world.”Stevens was one of six high-profile Mi’kmaq Warriors arrested after the Oct. 17 raid. He said he spent five weeks in solitary confinement following his arrest after the raid. He was freed on Dec. 20, 2013, after pleading guilty to five charges, including assaulting a police officer and obstructing a police officer. He was sentenced to time served.(RCMP tactical officers scope the situation during Oct. 17, 2013, raid on Mi’kmaq Warrior anti-fracking camp. APTN/File)Stevens said he is still struggling with trauma from his time in solitary confinement. He said it damaged his spirituality and still prevents him from being able to enter into a sweat lodge for ceremony because it is a confined space.“When I got arrested and I was put in the hole and with so many repeated strip-searches, I came so disconnected from my spirituality. When I got out, I wasn’t able to recover spiritually,” said Stevens. “One day I tried to go to a sweat and I was virtually in tears, I was so scared. They kind of took it away…. I have been trying to make sense of my life after those traumatic events that unfolded and what happened in Elsipogtog.”Stevens said the ongoing Native American-led demonstrations in North Dakota against an oil pipeline has again ignited a spark.“With the events unfolding in Standing Rock, with all the people rising up, it is a perfect time to get in right now because the fire is lit in the hearts of people,” he said. “More than it’s ever been.”Walia, who helped organize the speaking tour for Patles and Stevens, said Project SITKA fits a known pattern.“Canada has consistently treated Indigenous resurgence and nationhood as a threat,” said Walia. “Whether it’s ceremony or blockades, criminalization has often been an option of first resort rather than actually transforming policies that continue to sanction theft of Indigenous lands and Indigenous children.”Walia is a public supporter of the Unist’ot’en camp and Defenders of the Land.The Project SITKA report notes that the 16 individuals on the list from B.C. are linked to several groups, including the Unist’ot’en camp, which has dug in along the proposed routes of three pipelines in the province, Defenders of the Land, the American Indian Movement and No One is Illegal, among others.The report’s section on B.C. also notes two individuals on its list travelled from the province to the anti-shale gas demonstrations in Elsipogtog.Steven Kakinoosit travelled from B.C. to Elsipogtog with a group of 10 people after the Oct. 17, 2013, RCMP raid, arriving in New Brunswick in early November. There is nothing in the RCMP document to suggest Kakinoosit is on the list. However, he said it confirms what he’s always believed that Canadian authorities target those who stand up for Indigenous rights.“We are being monitored and harassed because of the fact that we are Indigenous people standing up for our rights,” said Kakinoosit, who lives in Prince George, B.C. “I would even go so far as to say they are doing this because they fear the rise of direct action and front-line workers coming from the inner cities. They realize, just as we do, they are the single most dangerous segment of our population because of the potential they have to rise up.”Elsipogtog First Nation member Brian Milliea, who was involved in the movement against shale gas exploration, said the community had no choice but to fight the prospect of hydraulic fracturing in their territory.“We didn’t choose this fight because we wanted to. We chose this fight because we had to,” said Milliea. “This movement, which the RCMP chose to categorize as violent terrorism and unlawful, was never that. Just like the movement in North Dakota was always peaceful and non-violent. The violence and brutality came when the RCMP brought in members from other districts who wanted to harm unarmed peaceful water protectors.”Milliea was visited in August 2014 by two plain-clothes RCMP officers who said they were from a special task force. The officers wanted to question Milliea about a Facebook post where he called for a protest on New Brunswick Day. The RCMP’s intelligence centre compiled the bulk of its Project SITKA report between April and September of 2014.Project SITKA reportDownload (PDF, Unknown)The Project SITKA intelligence report also focused on several groups linked to the 89 individuals on the list. Some of the main groups identified were the Unist’ot’en camp, Defenders of the Land, Idle No More, the American Indian Movement and the Indigenous Environmental Network.The Unist’ot’en camp is anchored by the Unist’ot’en clan of the Wet’suwet’en nation. The camp has dug in over the past six years in an area along the routes of two proposed liquid natural gas pipelines and a proposed oil pipeline. The camp sits about 66 km south of Houston, B.C., and about 1,000 km north of Vancouver. It has become a pilgrimage destination of sorts for activists because of its steadfast opposition to the pipelines and its off-the-grid sustainability.Dini Ze (Chief) Smogelgem, one of the main spokespeople for the camp, said it comes as no surprise the camp is on an RCMP list.“We’ve been on similar RCMP lists for years,” he said, in an interview with APTN Investigates journalist Rob Smith. “We’ve (seen) many reports, many internal confidential reports leaked to us over the years.”Smogelgem said he’s operated under the assumption the RCMP is keeping tabs on the camp and he expects the pressure to increase in the coming spring.“We’ve known of them spying on us for years…. It is how we live,” he said. “We are expecting a big push from them in the spring to deal with us. As you know, we’re not going anywhere. This is our home.”The intelligence report also names Russ Diabo, a Mohawk policy analyst originally from Kahnawake described in the document as a spokesperson for the Defenders of the Land group. The report does not suggest Diabo is on the list of 89, but he was the only individual whose name escaped the censors.“Spokesperson Russell Diabo has described Canada as being ‘at war with the First Nations people,’” said the report.Diabo, who has tracked the evolution of surveillance by Canadian law, said Project SITKA is just the latest incarnation of the RCMP’s efforts against Indigenous rights movements.“My ideas are a threat because I am challenging state sovereignty,” said Diabo. “I am saying we have pre-existing sovereignty.”Diabo is exploring legal options against the RCMP over his inclusion in the report.The report also claims the American Indian Movement (AIM) is the dominant organization in Manitoba when it comes to Indigenous rights activism.“(AIM) is the most influential organization within the province, with a number of its members organizing or attending events,” said the report. “Several members meet the criteria for this project and are listed as either volatile or disruptive protesters.”Project SITKA included 11 individuals from Manitoba on its list.Southern Chiefs Organization Grand Chief Terry Nelson was involved with opening an official AIM chapter in Winnipeg back in 2013. Nelson said AIM has been active in Manitoba and Saskatchewan since the 1990s.“AIM hasn’t been leading the charge, but it has certainly been working with the young people to get them ready,” said Nelson, a former vice-chair of AIM. “The attitude is different today than it was, and young people can and will take action. Look at what is happening at Standing Rock, they have really powerful support all over the world as a result of their spiritual prayer and peacefulness. Of course, if the Dakota people get killed, it would open up something they are not going to like.”Project SITKA list of groupsDownload (PDF, Unknown)In Ontario, the SITKA report names the Unist’ot’en camp and Idle No More as the two most influential organizations in the province. The intelligence report said pipelines are the main issue among Indigenous rights activist in the province and notes a railway blockade by Mohawks from Tyendinaga in March 2014 launched to call for an inquiry into murdered and missing Indigenous women-which the Liberal government announced soon after taking power in the fall of 2015.Prominent activist Clayton Thomas-Muller lived in Ottawa in 2014-when the SITKA report was compiled-and worked for Idle No More at the time. He has also visited the Unist’ot’en camp three times and was involved in fundraising for it. He has travelled internationally on various campaigns over the years.  APTN revealed in 2014 Thomas-Muller was under RCMP surveillance.The Project SITKA report notes some of the subjects on its threat lists from Ontario have “travelled to other provinces and internationally to attend events.”Thomas-Muller said First Nation peoples are “sovereign within the settler colonial state of Canada” which means there is a jurisdictional gray area when it comes to actions on self-determination when it comes to disputes on natural resource extraction.“Canada’s economy is built on the dispossession of Indigenous peoples from their lands and the marginalization of their rights, collective rights that are enshrined in section 35 of the Constitution,” said Thomas-Muller, who is currently a Stop it at the Source campaigner with 350.org. “It is up to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould to honour their word, lift up the honour of the Crown and honour their legal and fiduciary responsibility.”jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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Some reaction to the NDPs decision to proceed with the Site C

first_imgHere is some of the reaction to the NDP government’s decision to go ahead with the Site C hydroelectric dam in British Columbia:“Today is a dark day. The government has passed up its chance to stop this misbegotten project. Instead, it has betrayed First Nations and all those who voted in hope of stopping Site C.” — Peace Valley campaigner Galen Armstrong of the Sierra Club in B.C.___“In the long-run, Site C’s affordable energy is a huge competitive advantage for business in the province. B.C.’s hydroelectric system gives businesses and residents certainty that reliable and clean power will be available when it is needed.” — Val Litwin, president and CEO of the B.C. Chamber of Commerce.___“Affirming the construction of Site C is the right decision for the future of our province. Assuring a domestic source of clean, reliable hydroelectric power helps secure our energy system for the growth of businesses and sectors of the Lower Mainland and provincial economy for decades into the future.” — Iain Black, president and CEO of the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade.___“Since the 1970s when it was first proposed, the Site C dam has caused nothing but worry and heartbreak for the farm families and First Nations living in the Peace River Valley. With the election of the NDP government, there came reason to hope. But now the looming threat of a dam flooding them out is back – what a lost opportunity.” — National campaign director Joe Foy of the Wilderness Committee.___“With so much at stake for our province, better late than never for John Horgan and the NDP government to support Site C. This entire process and all of the uncertainty it caused was completely unnecessary. In the past four months, we have seen a rushed review and needless NDP-Green politicking create uncertainty and confusion that put this clean energy project, and the thousands of jobs it supports, at risk for no reason.” — Chris Gardner, president of the Independent Contractors and Businesses Association.___“It was John Horgan’s NDP that demanded a Site C inquiry by the B.C. Utilities Commission, and the results they received from it were clear: no need for the power, better alternatives once we do, and no advantage to ratepayers to proceed. With those findings, the only responsible choice was to immediately stop destroying the Peace River Valley. — Chief Roland Willson of the West Moberly First Nations.___“We recognize this has been a difficult decision for the newly elected NDP government. We respect and appreciate the many contributions from all sides of this issue because this was certainly not an easy choice. That said, completing the Site C dam remains the best choice for British Columbian families.” — Tom Sigurdson, executive director of the B.C. Building Trades.___“I am confident that First Nations will continue their efforts to stop Site C and the next step will be legal challenges. We have rights in our traditional territories and, just as important, we have responsibilities to those traditional territories — to protect them, maintain them and sustain them. If this project proceeds it will devastate traditional territories and sacred sites.” — National Chief Perry Bellegarde of the Assembly of First Nations.____“Taking a four billion-dollar bath with nothing to show for it would have been fiscally irresponsible.” — Kris Sims, B.C. director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.____“The Province has already broken its treaty promises to us, and that’s why we are going to trial in March.”“Premier Horgan could have done the right thing here and taken a step toward reconciliation, but he chose not to. Site C will be the single largest infringement of our rights under Treaty 8, and there is no justification for it.” — Blueberry River Chief Marvin Yahey.last_img read more

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Akinjo Hoyas hold off Campbells redhot Clemons 9385

first_imgWASHINGTON — James Akinjo made four straight free throws in the last 12 seconds to cool off a suddenly red-hot Campbell team and preserve Georgetown’s 93-85 win on Saturday.Georgetown (5-1) led all the way but saw a 22-point lead nearly evaporate in the final six minutes of the game. Campbell’s prolific Chris Clemons — the nation’s top scorer — went off for 45 points, tying his season high, 27 coming in the second half when he hit five of his nine 3-pointers and the Fighting Camels (3-3) came as close as six, 89-83, with 12 seconds left.Akinjo was fouled twice in the final seconds and made all four, finishing with 17 points and a perfect 6-for-6 at the foul line. Trey Mourning led with 27 points, 12 rebounds — both career highs —and three assists.Mourning’s father, Hoya and NBA great Alonzo Mourning was in the stands.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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State govt, KMC gear up to handle impact of cyclone

first_imgKolkata: The state government, along with Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC), is making all possible arrangements so that service can be extended on a war footing if there is any sort of damage caused due to the cyclone ‘Fani’, which is predicted to move towards Bengal soon.Chief Secretary Malay De held a meeting with concerned government departments and senior KMC officials led by Municipal Commissioner Khalil Ahmed at Nabanna on Tuesday and gave necessary instructions on the arrangements to be put in place for the cyclone. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaThe coastal areas and riverine areas like Howrah, Hooghly, East Midnapore and South 24-Parganas are likely to be affected more due to ‘Fani’. North Bengal is likely to face the effect of the cyclone on May 3, as per information from the weather office. Municipal Commissioner Khalil Ahmed also held a meeting at the KMC with senior officials of all concerned departments, to ensure that they keep a skeleton gang ready for necessary action on May 2, 3 and 4. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayAs per information received from the National Emergency Response Centre and the state department of Disaster Management and Civil Defence, expected wind speed of the cyclone may go up to 60 km/h, 85 km/h and 115 km/h on May 2, 3 and 4 respectively. Rainfall is expected to be in the range of 7 to 20 cm on May 3 and 4. The Parks & Gardens department has been requested to deploy men and machineries to attend to the emergent situation, for removal of uprooted trees including broken branches throughout the city. The Building department will deploy its team to tackle the situation as well. The Lighting department has been instructed to remove uprooted lampposts and disconnect electricity from the posts and similar necessary measures as and when required. The Sewerage and Drainage department and Solid Waste Management department have also been asked to attend to issues like waterlogging and others in the wake of the cyclone. The Municipal Secretary has also been asked to make arrangements for provision of relief material if required.last_img read more

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SC dismisses plea to advance voting timing for last phase of Lok Sabha election

first_imgNew Delhi: The Supreme Court Friday rejected a plea seeking a direction to the Election Commission (EC) to advance polling timing to 5:30 am from 7 am for seventh phase of the Lok Sabha election in view of searing heat and Ramzan. A vacation bench comprising Justices Indira Banerjee and Sanjiv Khanna said that court cannot go into the issue of poll timings and most phases of the Lok Sabha elections were already over. “We cannot get into poll times. It is the Election Commission’s call. There may be logistical issues,” the bench told advocate Mohammad Nizamuddin Pasha who had filed the petition. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss account details under automatic exchange framework “Part of elections are already over. Only one phase remains now,” the bench observed. When the counsel referred to the searing heat in parts of the country, especially between 12 noon to 3 PM, the bench said, “The timings are from 7 am to 6 pm. People can come in the morning to cast their votes.” On May 2, the top court had asked the poll panel to pass “necessary orders” on Pasha’s representation seeking advancing of voting timing for the remaining phase of Lok Sabha polls, which the EC had rejected on May 5. Also Read – Trio win Nobel Medicine Prize for work on cells, oxygen In his fresh plea in the apex court, the petitioner had said that the poll panel had turned down his representation as being “administratively not feasible”. Following the poll panel’s decision, Pasha had approached the apex court with his plea saying, “The reasoning given by the respondent (EC) in its order dated May 5 is ex-facie self contradictory as the respondent claims it has already taken acute hot weather conditions and festivals into account in fixing poll timing but still has passed orders fixing the same standard polling hours that are issued in every election at any time in any part of the country.” Polling for the seventh phase of elections will be held on May 19. The petitioner had earlier told the top court that during Ramzan, Muslims keep fast. The plea had said the India Meteorological Department has issued warning indicating severe heat wave conditions over the next few days in poll-bound areas, including Madhya Pradesh, Bihar and Jharkhand. The petitioner had said harsh weather conditions would make it difficult for Muslims to go out and vote.last_img read more

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CIL helps cyclone Fani-affected Puri

first_imgPuri: Coal India Ltd. (CIL) is leaving no stone unturned to help the Fani Cyclone affected people of Odisha. Cyclone Fani has damaged the entire power distribution infrastructure leaving residents of Puri in the dark. Mahanadi Coalfields Ltd. sent over 200 solar lamps to the collector of Puri to help the residents of Puri. A medical team comprising of doctors and paramedical staff from Nehru Shatabdi Central Hospital (NSCH), Talcher, MCL has been sent to Puri to serve the Fani affected people. CIL has also despatched 2500 Tarpaulins measuring 15′ X 12′ from Jagannath area of Mahanadi Coalfields Ltd. to the collector of Puri for distribution to residents of Puri, Odisha.last_img read more

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