Best of the Best Regatta on final leg this weekend in Nassau

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, December 4, 2017 – Nassau – Minister of Agriculture & Marine Resources, Renward R. Wells, held a press conference last week to update on The Bahamas’ second annual hosting of the Final Stretch of the “Best of the Best” Regatta, scheduled for December 7 thru 10, 2017 at Montagu Bay.   Minister Wells said that more than 50 boats are participating in the A, B and C classes and the Ministry has done its part to ensure the level of participation lives up to the name “Best of the Best.”He added that boat owners and captains will continue to inform the Ministry of what is needed to prepare for what may well be the most competitive weekend of sloop sailing in the history of The Bahamas — anticipating the weekend will be a ‘clash of the champions,’ this Thursday.“Speaking of champions, I am pleased that we will also be hosting the year-end race event for the Star Sailor’s League.  Sailors from around the world have begun arriving and training in Montagu Harbour for what, too, will be a very competitive race,” said Minister Wells.“As a fellow Olympian and a proud Bahamian, I am particularly pleased that we will be hosting a number of Olympic gold medalists and world champions in this race.   I thank Mr. Robert Dunkley and the Nassau Yacht Club team for their work in staging the races along with the Star Sailor’s League.   I am particularly delighted to announce that our own Olympic Gold medal winner, The Sea Wolf, Sir Durward Knowles, will be out to view the races.”#MagneticMediaNews#BestoftheBestRegattaPhoto credit: Life on The Hook Related Items:#BestoftheBestRegatta, #magneticmedianewslast_img read more

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LinkedIn to launch its own live video tool

first_imgSome LinkedIn members will be able to broadcast real-time video. Getty Images LinkedIn is testing its own live video feature. The networking platform this week is launching LinkedIn Live, a tool that enables users and companies to broadcast real-time video to select groups or to the LinkedIn world at large. TechCrunch spotted the news earlier Monday.The feature will come out in beta first in the US and it’ll be invite-only, according to a press release from the company. It’s unclear when or if LinkedIn will make it available for everyone to create LinkedIn Live videos; the company said it’ll evaluate the user experience based on this pilot. But users can submit an application form to try the tool in the coming weeks. The tool aims to broadcast conferences, advices from experts, news interviews and events hosted by influencers, companies and mentors. This marks LinkedIn’s latest effort to engage its 562 million users on top of providing a platform for career networking.  In November, it tested a feature that lets users create real-world events and invite their online connections, sort of like Facebook Events. LinkedIn has partnered with third-party broadcast tools like Telestream Wirecast, Switcher Studio, Wowza, Socialive, and Brandlive to ensure this new feature’s performance. The tools will give creators multiple ways to go live, including via desktop and mobile apps.NASA turns 60: The space agency has taken humanity farther than anyone else, and it has plans to go further.Taking It to Extremes: Mix insane situations — erupting volcanoes, nuclear meltdowns, 30-foot waves — with everyday tech. Here’s what happens. Share your voice Digital Media Mobile Apps Internet Services Tags Comments 2 LinkedInlast_img read more

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Hong Kong flight attendants fight back in MeToo waves

first_imgHong Kong-based flight attendant Venus Fung, who works for a European airline, posing during an interview with AFP in Hong Kong. Photo: AFPImmaculate-looking flight attendants who appear unruffled by the demands of a life spent in the air are part of the slick image sold by carriers — but Hong Kong-based workers are increasingly hitting back against sexual harassment.Female cabin crew told AFP of how they had been harassed by not only passengers but also other airline staff.While they say carriers have made some steps in the right direction, they argue airlines still lag far behind in the #MeToo era.Venus Fung, whose experiences drove her to join and lead the Cabin Attendants Union of Hong Kong, says airlines must teach workers on how to deal with harassment.Fung, 29, said the issue was never raised in her company training.The Hong Kong-based attendant told AFP she had been physically picked up by a pilot who touched her chest, waist and bottom, commenting she had a nice body, when she was new to the job more than two years ago.”At that moment I was really angry, but I was mostly also panicking and afraid. My mind went completely blank — I had no idea what to do or how to react,” said Fung, who works for a European airline which she did not want to identify for fear of recrimination.The cabin manager who witnessed the incident did not intervene, Fung added, instead threatening to report her for wearing a skirt that was “too tight”.As a result Fung stopped wearing skirts at work for more than a year, opting for trousers instead.She has since been training colleagues on how to report sexual harassment and seek help, but said long-term cultural changes are needed.”When a flight attendant comes out it looks very fancy with the uniform, heels and makeup. There are fantasies around this industry and it’s hard to change public perception but it absolutely cannot be an excuse for bad behaviour,” Fung said, calling for an awareness-raising campaign.”Education is key to changing people’s attitudes. It’s difficult to carry out overnight, it takes time, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t do these things.”The airline did not respond to requests by AFP for comment.Bikini backlashThe complaints from attendants like Fung come as demands for change grow worldwide.The US-based Association of Flight Attendants last year called on American airlines to “renounce the past objectification of flight attendants”.Vietnamese budget carrier VietJet, which has staffed some of its inaugural flights with bikini-clad attendants and publishes a calendar featuring scantily-dressed models posing on planes, has sparked criticism for its marketing ploys.Owned by Vietnam’s only female billionaire, the airline had to apologise for sending lingerie models to join the country’s under-23 football squad on a flight home in January after a social media outcry.Some airline staff in Hong Kong told AFP the perceived glamour attracted many women to the job — there are popular makeup tutorials on YouTube by flight attendants from Dubai-based airline Emirates on how to achieve their look.But others say some of the industry’s grooming standards are outdated.Staff at Hong Kong flag carrier Cathay Pacific must wear eyeshadow, lipstick and nail polish in specifically approved shades and check it at regular intervals, according to an official handbook.Male staff are also under scrutiny — banned from wearing make-up but told they must “maintain a clear complexion at all times”.Cathay’s cabin crew representatives say they will push to make nail polish optional in talks with the company next year.The airline announced in March it would introduce a trouser option for female attendants, ending a 70-year skirt rule.But Dora Lai, Cathay Pacific Flight Attendants Union leader and a cabin manager, said that while the move was a step toward gender equality, it would do little to end sexual harassment without a shift in public and staff awareness.Lai said many airline advertisements deployed beautiful women to sell the industry’s “sex appeal”, rather than the practical skills of the job.”We are there to provide a service and to bring our passengers safely from point A to point B,” she said.Zero toleranceDespite Cathay launching an online course with a special section on sexual harassment for Hong Kong cabin staff in March, the union says some in-flight managers continue to distrust staff who report cases.A Cathay attendant who did not want to be identified told AFP her in-flight manager had been reluctant to warn a passenger who had patted her head and back repeatedly, which she described as “humiliating”.”I felt angry and sad. I was the concerned party, not just relaying the incident… And after telling him, the supervisor was still not supportive,” she said.Cathay Pacific told AFP it provided training to all staff on the “prevention and elimination of discrimination and harassment in the workplace”.But attendant Michelle Choi said the company needed to go further to support staff in taking immediate action, from giving warnings to asking passengers to apologise, or in some cases reporting to police.”We want flight attendants to know what they can do instead of feeling embarrassed about reporting the case, and in the end making excuses to tolerate these acts as many used to do before,” she said.last_img read more

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