Euthanasia bill should not go ahead: law firm

first_imgNewsRoom 29 June 2018Family First Comment: Yep www.Protect.org.nzAhead of a five-part series examining submissions on the End of Life Choice Bill, Jeremy Rees takes a look at a group that argues the Bill is in no shape to be made lawThe law firm which handles many doctors’ legal issues in New Zealand has told a Parliamentary select committee that David Seymour’s End of Life Choice Bill is “suboptimal” and should not proceed.DLA Piper is retained by the Medical Protection Society to handle medical protection and indemnity work for doctors and practitioners. About 80 percent of New Zealand doctors are covered by MPS.In a submission to the Justice select committee, the law firm says it is concerned that such an important change to New Zealand law is contained in a private member’s bill which has had no formal consultation before drafting.“While the Bill is no doubt informed by prior public debate and clearly borrows from other jurisdictions, no formal consultation or engagement with stakeholders preceded its introduction,” it says in a submission, one of 35,000 to the committee.Although there are a number of submissions from medical practitioners and their representative bodies, many focus on issues of wording and process. The DLA Piper submission stands out by questioning the very basis of Seymour’s Bill.READ MORE: https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2018/06/28/134171/euthanasia-bill-should-not-go-ahead-law-firmlast_img read more

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Beach volleyball continues to serve streak of success

first_imgThe USC beach volleyball team is no stranger to winning.After going 34-2 overall and finishing last season on a 30-match winning streak to capture the sport’s first-ever NCAA championship title, the Trojans’ golden success on the sand has transferred over seamlessly into their 2017 campaign.The top-ranked Trojans currently own an unblemished 25-0 record this season and have since extended their program-record win streak to a remarkable 55 consecutive matches, with wins in 87 of their last 89 duals. In fact, USC hasn’t lost a match in nearly 400 days, dating all the way back to March 11, 2016.With a streak of that magnitude, you might expect there to be some added pressure to remain “perfect.”For the Trojans and head coach Anna Collier, however, the focus is not on the streak, but rather on playing good, high-quality beach volleyball every time they step out on the court — a style of play that Collier simply brands as “USC volleyball.”“We try not to focus on those winning streaks because we’ve obviously been down that road before,” Collier said. “Last season was last season, and after winning back-to-back national championships, the target is definitely on our backs. But what we’re just trying to do is play the best volleyball we can, and if we can do that, then the byproduct will be that three-peat.”And this year’s new-look Trojans are certainly poised to make another big run in the postseason. In addition to Collier, who is the first and only collegiate beach volleyball coach to reach 100 career victories with a 133-17 overall record (.886), USC has relied on a roster filled with experienced upperclassmen to lead the way.Perhaps the most impressive feat this year, however, has been the fact that the Trojans have maintained that success even with shuffled pairs and multiple injuries.The current lineup is comprised of five seniors, three juniors, a sophomore and a freshman. All but one of those five pairs had played together before the start the season, though, as the No. 2, 3, 4 and 5 pairs were all newly formed this year. And yet, with about half of the regular season completed, all four of those new pairs have already reached double-digit wins despite battling multiple injuries on each court. The one constant for USC has been at the top court, where seniors Kelly Claes and Sara Hughes have steamrolled over their competition. The All-Americans and the winningest pair in NCAA history have played together since the beginning of the 2015 season and have since compiled a 122-4 all-time record (.968). They also had a nice streak of their own, winning an incredible 103-consecutive matches dating back to April 2, 2015. It’s this type of consistency and big-time play from top to bottom that has helped position the Trojans well for a chance to win their third consecutive national title this spring. Claes acknowledged that the depth of her team and their willingness to compete and win has been a big factor to USC’s success this season.“We all knew coming into the year that every single team would be gunning for us,” Claes said. “But that was something we all really embraced. Every team we face is going to be playing their best against us no matter what, and we’re up to that challenge and ready to prove why we’re the best team in the nation.”In retrospect, the last four years of the collegiate beach volleyball scene have been dominated by USC and its senior class. Claes, Hughes, Sophie Bukovec, Nicolette Martin and Allie Wheeler — all starters since the day they arrived on campus — own a combined record of 110-5 overall for an impressive .957 career winning percentage. With about a month left in the season, though, Hughes and the rest of the Trojans are eager and ready to defend their title in the upcoming tournament.“Staying on top is definitely the mantra this year,” Hughes said. “There were so many amazing firsts last season, like winning Pac-12s and NCAAs, and the streak has been pretty cool too. But while we’re really proud of what we accomplished, this season we have to work even harder to win them again. The ultimate goal has always been to win a national championship at the end of the season. We know it’s not going to be easy, but we’re ready to fight and we want to go out with a bang.”last_img read more

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Drive to make all cops tops

first_imgRay Maota The “Promote Professional Policing –reward a cop, report a cop” campaignaims to encourage citizens to report goodand bad behaviour by police officers.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. Formore free images, visit the image library) Andrew Faull, senior researcher at the ISS,is also author of Behind the Badge, anin-depth look at the lives of South Africanpolice, who tell about their experiencesin uniform.(Image: Books Live)MEDIA CONTACTS• Andrew FaullInstitute for Security Studies: SeniorResearcher+27 12 346 9500A recently launched initiative to promote professionalism in South Africa’s police force calls on the public to speak out about good and bad cop conduct.The Institute for Security Studies (ISS) launched the “Promote Professional Policing – reward a cop, report a cop” campaign in Johannesburg on 1 September 2011.The campaign aims to encourage citizens to report police involved in corruption, and recognise those who do well in their profession.It was brought about after the ISS’s Crime and Justice Programme (CJP) delved into the public’s perception of the police and the root of corruption among officers.The programme found that the majority of South Africans perceived the police as lazy and corrupt.CJP head Gareth Newham said: “Whilst there is no denying that some deserve that label, many police men and women want nothing more than to serve the public with pride.”Newham added that because there were police officers who were courageous, respectful and dignified; members of the public should encourage them by recognising their efforts.Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa said at the launch: “Understandably, members of the public often take the time to report complaints and negative experiences they have of the police, and we take these complaints and experiences very seriously.”Mthethwa also urged the public to support those officers who were professional and service-orientated.The minister said that the campaign was a platform for the public to voice their experiences with the police, be they good or bad.By showing recognition to those selfless police who strive to protect and serve, those who are corrupt will be isolated and the decline of it will be evident, said Newham.Rewarding and reportingMeasures have been put in place to help the public report on negative and positive policing.The Crime Hub website provides tips on how promote policing excellence, and a Facebook page called Professional-Policing has been set up where citizens can join a forum to share their experiences with others.There are also tips on the Facebook page for how people can reward good policing and report cases of bad police conduct.In addition, the public can follow @RewardaCop on Twitter for the latest news on good and bad policing.Creating a culture of better policingMpho Kwinika, president of the South African Police Union, said: “This campaign comes at an opportune time when police morale is very low. The best reward a cop can get is when communities work with the police to aid an arrest.”According to Andrew Faull, senior ISS researcher, studies have found that the public’s perception of police is not based on how effective they are in tackling crime, but rather how they treat civilians discourteously, abusively or with unnecessary force.Although the recently released crime statistics show that violent criminal acts are on the decline, police still need to work on their treatment of the public to bolster their reputation.Faull said: “What police must realise is that annual announcements of declining crime will only win police momentary legitimacy, what is far more important is that every encounter between a police official and a member of the public is based on procedural justice, fairness, and courtesy.”last_img read more

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Gov’t Committed to Social Intervention in Tackling Crime – Dr. Chang

first_img Minister of National Security, Hon. Dr. Horace Chang, says the Government is committed to a comprehensive programme of social intervention in tackling crime in the society. Dr. Chang said the significant value of social intervention has been proven at the Glendevon Primary School in the parish, where there was a more than 90 per cent increase in Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) passes following targeted social work at that institution. Story Highlightscenter_img Minister of National Security, Hon. Dr. Horace Chang, says the Government is committed to a comprehensive programme of social intervention in tackling crime in the society.“We have identified that targeted social intervention is a critical medium-term strategy to allay the effects of crime. We are aiming to identify the pathology of the behaviour and treat it,” he said at a stakeholders’ forum on community intervention at the Iberostar Hotel in the parish on April 5.Dr. Chang argued that the country will only be able to overcome the many challenges of crime, poverty and disorder when “we commit to systemic solutions within a specified framework aimed at tackling the root causes”.He noted that the enhanced security measures that have been implemented, while effective “are not sustainable, long-term solutions to the issue of criminality and social disorder in this town and others across Jamaica”.He said the Government must, therefore, ensure that crime-prevention activities and social programmes are paired with security measures “to achieve sustainable, impactful change to the most at-risk communities. To accomplish this, Government must align social services that complement and enhance each other”.Dr. Chang said the significant value of social intervention has been proven at the Glendevon Primary School in the parish, where there was a more than 90 per cent increase in Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) passes following targeted social work at that institution.He argued that “successes like these” can become the norm when there is greater collaboration among ministries, departments and agencies (MDAs).Such coordination, he said, will ensure better use of fiscal resources and result in more significant impact in the most vulnerable communities.“The development of this kind of strategic approach is why we are all gathered here today. It is my hope that we will emerge with practical, workable solutions that can be implemented for the benefit of affected communities and Jamaica at large,” he expressed.“We are aware that it is our people and their resilience that move Jamaica towards its greatest potential. It is with this understanding that the Ministry of National Security seeks to establish an agreed framework for social-intervention coordination,” he added.The workshop, sponsored by the Ministry, was geared towards crafting an overarching framework to coordinate social interventions and create positive change for communities in St. James.It pulled together representatives of social agencies, who shared ideas on how to create and maintain a safer environment in St. James and surrounding parishes.Dr. Chang praised the initiative as “a vital aspect in the fight against crime”, adding that “as a nation, Jamaica has long seen great value in social-intervention programmes”.He challenged the stakeholders to work to create the impact and change that St. James needs at this time.“If all of us work together, really follow up, follow through, seek change and maintain that presence in the communities, then change will come,” he said.The workshop brought together 36 MDAs, including the Ministries of – Economic Growth and Job Creation; Education, Youth and Information; Local Government and Community Development; Labour and Social Security; and Health; the Social Development Commission (SDC); HEART Trust/NTA; National Parenting Support Commission (NPSC); Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF); Child Protection and Family Services Agency (CPFSA); Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ); Peace Management Initiative (PMI); Dispute Resolution Foundation; and Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA); among others.The initiative forms part of the Ministry’s five-pillar crime strategy, with emphasis on crime prevention through social development.last_img read more

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