McDonalds Testing Less Artificial Chicken McNuggets In Two US Markets

first_img April 27, 2016 McDonald’s Corp. said it is testing new recipes for its staple Chicken McNuggets snack in some U.S. markets to cater to growing consumer demand for healthier food.The company said on Wednesday it started testing a “simpler” recipe for the snack in 140 restaurants in Oregon and Washington state last month.McDonald’s did not detail the specific ingredients in the new nuggets, but said it was a recipe “parents can feel good about.”The nuggets being tested in Portland do not contain any artificial preservatives, the company said in an emailed statement.McDonald’s also did not say whether it would roll out the new recipes nationally.The news, which was first reported by Crain’s Chicago Business, follows McDonald’s announcement last year that it would phase out human antibiotics from its chicken supply in the United States within the next two years.(Reporting by Yashaswini Swamynathan in Bengaluru; Editing by Sriraj Kalluvila) Next Article –shares Add to Queue Image credit: REUTERS/MIKE BLAKE A McDonald’s restaurant is pictured in Encinitas, California September 9, 2014. McDonald’s Reuters This story originally appeared on Reuters McDonald’s Testing Less Artificial Chicken McNuggets In Two U.S. Markets 1 min read Register Now » Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Businesslast_img read more

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This Question Will Help Your Friendships Survive Past the Election

first_img This Question Will Help Your Friendships Survive Past the Election Tasha Eurich November 9, 2016 This article originally published Oct. 13, 2016. I recently spent the weekend with one of my dearest friends. She is brilliant, hilarious, kind and giving, and I just adore her. We have one of those rare and wonderful friendships that comes along just a few times in life (if we’re lucky).But my friend also holds—quite literally — the opposite political views as I do. And if I’m honest, I’ve often caught myself wondering why someone so utterly wonderful could also be so spectacularly wrong.For that reason, even though I’d been looking forward to seeing her for months, I was also a bit nervous about what would happen if we talked about politics. I was certain that no amount of discussion was going to change her mind, so I decided that the best strategy was to avoid the topic altogether.But in the weeks leading up to my visit, this vexing question still haunted me: how could my friend be so wrong?Then, the day before I got on the plane to see her, a different thought popped into my mind. What if, I wondered, I’m the one who is wrong? It was a question that I had never considered.Granted, for any hot-button political issue, there is rarely a singular, unequivocal “right answer.” Most of us realize, at least intellectually, that there are many valid ways of seeing the world. But personally, when I feel strongly about something, it’s hard to see past my beliefs and assumptions. As a result, I rarely question them.If I may be so bold, I’m clearly not the only one who is guilty of this.Related: 3 Ways to Listen Better and Become a More Effective CommunicatorResearch shows that we typically assume that others share our views (often called the False Consensus Effect) and get upset when they don’t. After all, our beliefs are so rational, so well-thought out and so correct that unless someone was a total moron, they would come to the same conclusion. This logic is deeply flawed, and it makes us cling absurdly tightly to our opinions. (Research suggests that even when they are threatened by pesky things like facts, we tend to overlook those facts or discredit the source.)Of late, as anyone with a social media account can attest, when we shout our beliefs from the rooftops and label everyone who doesn’t share them ill-informed (or worse), there are real consequences to our self-awareness, our success and our relationships. Case in point: a recent study found that this year, nearly one in 10 people have ended a friendship because of an election-related disagreement.But this problem and its consequences don’t just show up in our political discussions. Perhaps you think that your spouse’s approach to parenting is ineffective, and it’s landed you into a seemingly endless series of disagreements. Or at work, after shutting down a colleague who suggested a smarter strategy, you were surprised to see your performance suffer. Or you just can’t get behind your friend’s new significant other, even though you haven’t even tried to see this person the way your friend sees them.Fascinatingly, our reluctance to question our beliefs may be biologically based. As neuroscientist V.S. Ramachandran describes, when we encounter a differing viewpoint, the two hemispheres of our brain lock horns in a fierce battle. The left hemisphere, usually associated with rational and logical thought, fights to preserve our existing beliefs while the right hemisphere wants to play devil’s advocate and see things more objectively. But when our right and left hemispheres square off, the left hemisphere usually wins.Given the biological basis of such behavior, does this mean that we are forever doomed to judge, argue with and “unfriend” the people who don’t agree with us? Thankfully, we can loosen our left hemisphere’s white knuckled grip, but it takes conscious effort. The question I asked myself with my friend — “what if I’m the one who is wrong?” — is a surprisingly effective way to help our right hemisphere get a word in edgewise.Related: 6 Tips for Talking Politics at Work Without Causing an UproarOf course, when I first pondered this question, I was more than a little distraught. The more I thought about it, the more I realized that it really was possible. Even if I wasn’t actually “wrong,” I was pretty sure that adopting this mindset would help me develop a richer, fuller perspective.When I arrived at my friend’s apartment the next day, I dropped my bags and promptly announced that I wanted to spend the weekend trying to understand her political views. With a wry smile, she agreed.From the moment we started talking, I found myself listening in a completely new way. I wasn’t getting upset or emotional. I wasn’t trying to compose fact-based retorts. I was just hearing her. This, I realized, is what the late, great Stephen Covey really meant when he advised us to “seek first to understand, then be understood.”This didn’t meant that the entire weekend was easy. There were a few times that I wanted to storm out of the room, but it was far less than I would have predicted. By the end of the weekend, I had a much, much richer appreciation of my friend’s perspective.Of course, it’s one thing to commit to understanding the people we love — our spouse, our friends, our family — but let’s extend this idea one step further: can (and should) we apply this concept to people we don’t like or respect?I recently heard an interview with Amaryllis Fox, a former counter-terrorism clandestine services officer. In it, she provided one of the most profound observations about human behavior I have ever heard. “The one thing I learned in the Agency,” she said, “is that everyone thinks they’re the good guy.”In Fox’s case, she learned that the only way to fight the bad guys was to try to understand what would make otherwise normal people commit such grievous acts. Anytime we label our enemies as completely bad people — be they religious radicals, the school bully or a particularly sociopathic boss — we can’t even begin to intelligently deal with them. As Abraham Lincoln once declared, “I don’t like that man. I must get to know him better.”Related: Why It’s OK To Let Donald Trump Into the WorkplaceMy “weekend of understanding” with my friend hasn’t changed my position much, but a lot of things are different. I genuinely respect where she’s coming from. I feel smarter and more informed. Most importantly, our relationship is stronger.This is a somewhat counter-intuitive lesson: the next time you discover that someone you love, respect or work with has a wildly different opinion about something, don’t waste time trying to make them see things your way, or avoid the subject in an attempt to minimize conflict.* Instead, ask yourself “what if I’m wrong?” and really entertain their perspective.At the end of the day, as British philosopher and Nobel laureate Bertrand Russell advised, when we don’t feel absolutely certain about anything, that’s when we truly begin to understand who we are and appreciate others for the same thing. Communication Organizational psychologist and best-selling author 7 min read Guest Writer Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Register Now » Stop assuming you’re entirely right and start trying to understand the people you believe are entirely wrong. Next Article Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Add to Queue Image credit: Milton Brown | Getty Images –shareslast_img read more

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Sandia researchers uncover personalized medicine software vulnerability

first_imgSecurity cybersleuthsRelated StoriesIT Faces the Digital Pathology Data TsunamiNutritional supplements offer no protection against cardiovascular diseases, say researchersIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyTo find this vulnerability, Hudson and his cybersecurity colleagues at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used a platform developed by Sandia called Emulytics to simulate the process of genome mapping. First, they imported genetic information simulated to resemble that from a sequencer. Then they had two servers send information to Emulytics. One provided a standard genome sequence and the other acted as the “man-in-the-middle” interceptor. The researchers mapped the sequencing results and compared results with and without an attack to see how the attack changed the final sequence.”Once we discovered that this attack could change a patient’s genetic information, we followed responsible disclosure,” Hudson said. The researchers contacted the open source developers, who then issued a patch to fix the problem. They also contacted public agencies, including cybersecurity experts at the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team, so they could more widely distribute information about this issue.The research, funded by Sandia’s Laboratory Directed Research and Development program, continues testing other genome mapping software for security weaknesses. Differences between each computer program mean the researchers might find a similar, but not identical, issue, Hudson said. The LDRD funding also supports membership in the National Science Foundation’s Center for Computational Biology and Genomic Medicine.Along with installing the latest version of BWA, Hudson and his colleagues recommend other “cyberhygiene” strategies to secure genomic information, including transmitting data over encrypted channels and using software that protects sequencing data from being changed. They also encourage security researchers who routinely analyze open source software for weaknesses to look at genomics programs. This practice is common in industrial control systems in the energy grid and software used in critical infrastructure, Hudson said, but would be a new area for genomics security.”Our goal is to make systems safer for people who use them by helping to develop best practices,” he said. Source:Sandia National Laboratories Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 2 2019A weakness in one common open source software for genomic analysis left DNA-based medical diagnostics vulnerable to cyberattacks.Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories identified the weakness and notified the software developers, who issued a patch to fix the problem. The issue has also been fixed in the latest release of the software. While no attack from this vulnerability is known, the National Institutes of Standards and Technology recently described it in a note to software developers, genomics researchers and network administrators.The discovery reveals that protecting genomic information involves more than safe storage of an individual’s genetic information. The cybersecurity of computer systems analyzing genetic data is also crucial, said Corey Hudson, a bioinformatics researcher at Sandia who helped uncover the issue.Personalized medicine -; the process of using a patient’s genetic information to guide medical treatment -; involves two steps: sequencing the entire genetic content from a patient’s cells and comparing that sequence to a standardized human genome. Through that comparison, doctors identify specific genetic changes in a patient that are linked to disease.Genome sequencing starts with cutting and replicating a person’s genetic information into millions of small pieces. Then a machine reads each piece numerous times and transforms images of the pieces into sequences of building blocks, commonly represented by the letters A, T, C and G. Finally, software collects those sequences and matches each snippet to its place on a standardized human genome sequence. One matching program used widely by personalized genomics researchers is called Burrows-Wheeler Aligner (BWA).Sandia researchers studying the cybersecurity of this program found a weak spot when the program imports the standardized genome from government servers. The standardized genome sequence traveled over insecure channels, which created the opportunity for a common cyberattack called a “man-in-the-middle.”In this attack, an adversary or a hacker could intercept the standard genome sequence and then transmit it to a BWA user along with a malicious program that alters genetic information obtained from sequencing. The malware could then change a patient’s raw genetic data during genome mapping, making the final analysis incorrect without anyone knowing it. Practically, this means doctors may prescribe a drug based on the genetic analysis that, had they had the correct information, they would have known would be ineffective or toxic to a patient. Forensic labs and genome sequencing companies that also use this mapping software were temporarily vulnerable to having results maliciously altered in the same way. Information from direct-to-consumer genetic tests was not affected by this vulnerability because these tests use a different sequencing method than whole genome sequencing. Corey Hudson, bioinformatics researcher at Sandia last_img read more

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Exposure to nearby greenspace associated with reduced cravings

first_imgRelated StoriesHigher levels of physical activity not linked to greater volume or activity of brown adipose tissueQuitting drinking may improve health-related quality of life for womenNIHR review reveals evidence on how to increase physical activity in everyday lifeFor the research, participants completed an online survey that explored the relationships between various aspects of nature exposure, craving and negative affect.Among other things, it measured the proportion of greenspace in an individual’s residential neighborhood, the presence of green views from their home, their access to a garden or allotment; and their frequency of use of public greenspaces.The results showed that having access to a garden or allotment was associated with both lower craving strength and frequency, while residential views incorporating more than 25% greenspace evoked similar responses.The study also measured physical activity undertaken within the same time frame that cravings were assessed, showing the reduced craving occurred irrespective of physical activity level.Dr Sabine Pahl, Associate Professor (Reader) in Psychology, added: Craving contributes to a variety of health-damaging behaviors such as smoking, excessive drinking and unhealthy eating. In turn, these can contribute to some of the greatest global health challenges of our time, including cancer, obesity and diabetes. Showing that lower craving is linked to more exposure to green spaces is a promising first step. Future research should investigate if and how green spaces can be used to help people withstand problematic cravings, enabling them to better manage cessation attempts in the future.” It has been known for some time that being outdoors in nature is linked to a person’s wellbeing. But for there to be a similar association with cravings from simply being able to see green spaces adds a new dimension to previous research. This is the first study to explore this idea, and it could have a range of implications for both public health and environmental protection programs in the future.” Source:University of PlymouthJournal reference:Martin, L. et al. (2019) Natural environments and craving: The mediating role of negative affect. Health & Place. doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2019.102160. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 12 2019Being able to see green spaces from your home is associated with reduced cravings for alcohol, cigarettes and harmful foods, new research has shown.The study, led by the University of Plymouth, is the first to demonstrate that passive exposure to nearby greenspace is linked to both lower frequencies and strengths of craving.It builds on previous research suggesting exercising in nature can reduce cravings, by demonstrating the same may be true irrespective of physical activity.Researchers say the findings add to evidence that points to the need to protect and invest in green spaces within towns and cities, in order to maximize the public health benefits they may afford. They also suggest the causality of this link needs to be investigated further.The study, published in the journal Health & Place, is the first to investigate the relationship between exposure to natural environments, craving for a range of appetitive substances and the experiencing of negative emotions or feelings.It involved academics from the University’s School of Psychology, with support from the European Centre for Environment and Human Health at the University of Exeter.Leanne Martin, who led the research as part of her Master’s degree in Plymouth, said:last_img read more

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BMW to make electric MINIs in China with Great Wall Motor

first_imgBMW Group and China’s biggest SUV brand, Great Wall Motor, have announced a partnership to produce electric MINI vehicles in China. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Citation: BMW to make electric MINIs in China with Great Wall Motor (2018, July 10) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-bmw-electric-minis-china-great.html © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. China auto sales rise 7.9 percent in May as electrics surge Tuesday’s announcement comes as automakers pour billions of dollars into creating electric models for China, the biggest market for the technology, under pressure from Beijing to accelerate development.BMW and Great Wall said the venture also will produce electric vehicles under the Chinese partner’s brand.Other automakers including General Motors Co., Volkswagen AG and Nissan Motor Co. have announced similar plans with local partners to produce dozens of electric models for China.last_img read more

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Heavy rains lash Karnataka CM reviews situation

first_img SHARE SHARE EMAIL As rains pounded many parts of Karnataka leaving a trail of destruction, chief minister H D Kumaraswamy today directed Chief Secretary K Ratna Prabha and other officials to undertake the relief work on a war footing.He directed the officials to remain alert round-the-clock and give updates on the situation and development to his office on a real time basis, an official release said.Kumaraswamy also held a meeting with the chief secretary and the deputy commissioners of the district and instructed them to ensure that fund crunch did not affect relief work.The chief secretary briefed him on the measures taken so far and said sufficient funds for relief work was available with all the deputy commissioners.The chief minister also ordered all the district in charge secretaries to rush to their respective districts and take immediate steps for overseeing the relief work in rain-related areas.The Chief Secretary instructed the officials to give by Monday detailed reports on the situation and damage caused by the rain and undertake relief works speedily.Several parts of the state have been lashed by rains in the past few days. Heavy downpour was continuing in Belagavi, Gadag, Chikmagaluru, Mysuru and Chamarajnagara districts, officials said. June 02, 2018 SHARE COMMENT COMMENTScenter_img Karnataka Chief Minister H D Kumaraswamy Published on weather Karnatakalast_img read more

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Ensure proper devolution to states KCR

first_imgSHARE SHARE EMAIL Union Budget Published on January 13, 2019 COMMENTS financial policycenter_img COMMENT Telangana The Finance Commission (FC) should become a policy formulating body to ensure proper devolution to states, according to Chief Minister K. Chandrashekar Rao.Speaking at a review meeting with officials ahead of the visit of the 15th Finance Commission to the state, Rao said the commission generally visits the states with “preconceived” notions.In view of rapid changes in the Indian economy, the functioning of the FC should not be a routine affair, he added.Though there have been different governments at the national and state level since Independence with different political parties, there has not been a qualitative change in Centre-state financial relations and, hence, it is time to introspect, the Chief Minister observed.”The broad fiscal policy lies with the Government of India. Whatever they are supposed to devolve, they have instead centralised,” Rao said.BUDGET While asking officials to prepare for a new Budget, theChief Minister said the state budget should be formulated only after defining “livelihood” as applicable to conditions in the state.While touching upon different aspects of the proposed budget, Rao said the money the government had spent during the past four years and next five years should be factored in.Describing Hyderabad as a global city, he said it needed a minimum of 100 urban parks and a master plan should be prepared. SHARElast_img read more

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