No One Ever Told Tanya Grief Felt So Like Fear in Class

first_img BBC Officially Cancels ‘Class,’ And I’m SadSchool’s Out for ‘Class’ Creator Patrick Ness Stay on target This article contains spoilers for “Nightvisiting,” episode three of Class season one.Grief is a powerful motivator.Almost as powerful as hatred.On the two-year anniversary of her father’s death, Tanya mourns his passing with flowers, tears, and a heart-to-heart with the late policeman.Unlike its parent series, Class pulls no punches when it comes to evil doings in and around Coal Hill School. Writer and creator Patrick Ness knows when to tease out a villain (see “The Coach with the Dragon Tattoo”), and when to just get on with the explanations and the vanquishing (see this episode).Dear Ol’ Dad Jasper is clearly not actually sitting in Tanya’s bedroom, expecting a chat. Just as Ram’s murdered girlfriend Rachel and Miss Quill’s long-departed sister Orla’ath—each sprouting an alien umbilical cord from their back—are not here for a friendly visit.At only 14 years old, Tanya has experienced more emotional trauma than most will in a lifetime; the child prodigy has been hardened to the ways of the world—terrestrial and alien.So when the ghost of her father appears on the anniversary of his passing, she almost shrugs off the situation, saying that she doesn’t think she’s “dealing with this very well.”Frankly, she’s not: It’s her heartache that’s led a grief-sucking race of aliens directly to her bedroom window, like sharks smelling blood. The Lankin travel through space and time to gather wounded souls—just like Tanya’s (and Ram’s and Quill’s).“The more souls we gather together, the more energy the Lankin have,” Jasper explains, urging Tanya to take his hand so “I can ease your pain.”Unable to take people against their will, the chameleon-like Lankin morph into lost loved ones, in an effort to entice new victims (a stranger in a white van full of candy and toys). Then, by taking another life, the alien feeds on the next generation of mourners, creating an unending cycle, as Ram so aptly pointed out (while clinging to Tanya’s pajama-clad leg—a surefire survival tactic, I’ve heard).Tanya fights fear with anger (via BBC)While the hungry alien creature feeds on unwitting Londoners, Charlie and Beau newly homeless Matteusz take their relationship to the next level, just as sparks begin to fly for April and Ram.Bonding over death, destruction, and folk music, the teenagers share a sweet (if not brief) kiss. After all, if the world’s ending, what’s one smooch between diverse classmates forced together by extraordinary circumstances friends?This episode, expertly written by Ness, plays with words and phrasing in a most satisfyingly subtle way. When Matteusz confesses to Charlie that his homophobic father kicked him out because “if I don’t have a boyfriend, he doesn’t have to think about it.”But Charlie—he exists. He’s a “real person.” Unlike those imitations haunting Tanya, Quill, and Ram.Everyone deals with sadness and loss in their own way. Some bottle up their feelings, others set them free. I tend to spend a quiet evening alone, sobbing into a pint of Ben & Jerry’s froyo and watching my favorite Barry Manilow live concert DVDs.Tanya, however, fights back. Younger than her peers, she is at once guarded and hasty; desperate to fit in with the Scooby Gang, she’ll never show her hand to anyone.“My grief may be strong, but my anger is stronger,” she declares to the weakening monster. “And that’s what I gave you. … You don’t get to have my closure.”The bitter taste of outrage was not enough, though, to defeat the Lankin. So Miss Quill drives a double-decker bus into the city-wide vines, forcing it back through the rift.“We beat it together,” Tanya cheers in the end. “Finally we did something as a team”—just as the Doctor ordered.Missed episode two of Class? Check out our recap of “The Coach with the Dragon Tattoo,” as well as our review of Doctor Who episode “Thin Ice.”last_img read more

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From 400 Feet Underwater Seychelles President Urges Marine Protection

first_imgStay on target Sometimes love words just ain’t enough.Seychelles President Danny Faure on Sunday delivered a live address from more than 400 feet below the Indian Ocean surface.Surrounded by what he described as “the beating blue heart of our planet,” the president made clear that the world’s oceans need protecting.“At this depth, I can see not only the incredible beauty of our ocean, but the care that it urgently needs to stay this way,” Faure, dressed casually in a T-shirt and shorts, said.Supported by an alliance of 40 partners, Seychelles and the Nekton Oxford Deep Ocean Research Institute are launching First Descent—a series of expeditions to explore and conserve the world’s most unknown and least-protected bodies of water, the Indian Ocean.“It is not just because I am from paradise on Earth that I have a special relationship with the sea,” Faure said of his country, an archipelago off the east coast of Africa. “The sea has a special relationship with all of us.“It keeps the planet alive. It keeps us alive,” he continued. “And it is clear to me that it is under threat like never before.”In the first ever live speech from a submersible, the president listed the myriad ways “we”—humans—have negatively impacted two-thirds of our planet: climate change, ocean acidification, overfishing, plastic pollution.“From this depth, I can see the incredible wildlife that needs our protection, and the consequences of damaging this huge ecosystem that has existed for millenia,” Faure said. “Over the years, we have created these problem. We can solve them. … We must solve them.”He urged global leaders to come together for “decisive, coordinated” action; to develop “concrete steps” like expanding protected marine areas, creating sustainable fisheries management, and preventing plastic waste from entering our oceans.Seychelles President Danny Faure and Nekton pilot Randy Holt more than 400 feet below the Indian Ocean surface (via Nekton Mission/Associated Press)Island nations like Seychelles are first in line to take a beating from rising sea levels, coastal erosion, and the loss of coral reefs. Which is why the country has already committed to protecting 30 percent of its waters by 2020.“The deep ocean is the beating heart of the planet, yet we have better maps of … Mars than we do of the ocean floor,” Faure pointed out. “This needs to change.”Speaking to press, the submerged president marveled at the unique experience.“It’s so, so cool. So, so cool,” he repeated, telling of an encounter with a massive manta ray.If only everyone could have the chance come face-to-face with the beauty of our aquatic ecosystem. Then maybe more people would be as propelled to action as Faure, who said his determination and conviction are “stronger … than ever.”“We are the guardians of two-thirds of this blue planet’s surface. We must act accordingly,” Faure warned. “This issue is bigger than all of us. And we cannot wait for the next generation to solve it. We are running out of excuses to not take action. And running out of time.”More on Geek.com:Oil-Eating Bacteria Found in World’s Deepest Ocean TrenchScientists Outline How to Protect ⅓ of World’s Oceans by 2030Climate Change Will Affect the Color of Oceans, Study Says Watch: Great White Shark Bumps Into Boat Near Whale CarcassMan Paddles 2,900 Miles Across Pacific to Help Curb Ocean Pollution last_img read more

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