Memorials honor two students

first_imgMemorial services were planned this week in honor of the recent deaths of juniors Xinhai Huang and Samuel Levine.The memorial service for Levine was held Monday night at 10 p.m. at the Sigma Chi fraternity house, where the brothers of Sigma Chi held a candlelight vigil in Levine’s honor.In memoriam · About 300 students gathered Monday at the Sigma Chi Fraternity on The Row to honor Sam Levine, a junior who died in Mexico. — Austin Vogel | Daily TrojanThe memorial service for Huang will take place today at 5 p.m. in Room 450 of the Ronald Tutor Campus Center.Huang, a 22-year-old junior majoring in electrical engineering, died March 18 in a two-car collision about five miles southwest of the University Park Campus.Viterbi School of Engineering Dean Yannis Yortsos said Huang’s death was tragic for both his family and the Trojan Family.“We grieve for a promising life cut short, and for his parents who have lost their son,” Yortsos said in a statement.Levine, a 22-year-old senior majoring in psychology and a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity, died March 19 while on vacation in Cabo San Lucas, according to a statement released by Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences Dean Steve Kay.“Sam touched so many of us here at USC with his talents and ambition,” Kay said in the statement. “We all grieve for his incredibly promising life that was tragically cut short.”Both statements urged students, staff and faculty seeking support to contact Student Counseling Services or the Center for Work and Family Life.Students who would like to schedule an appointment for grief counseling can make an appointment by calling Student Counseling Services at (213) 740-7711 or the Center for Work and Family Life at (213) 821-0800 during business hours.last_img read more

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Water polo promotes new co-head coach

first_imgTwo brains are better than one · After leading the men’s water polo program solo for 21 seasons, Jovan Vavic is promoting long-time assistant and former player Marko Pintaric to a co-coaching position. Daily Trojan file photoThe men’s water polo team has consistently been a dominant force in the pool and is now adding a second head coach to their ranks. Marko Pintaric, recently named co-head coach of the men’s water polo program, adds to this intense atmosphere, joining head coach Jovan Vavic by the pool.During the spring, Pintaric was in full control of the men’s team. While head coach Jovan Vavic would most likely be yelling at the women’s team he also coaches, Pintaric, nicknamed “Pinta” by his players, would be ripping a male athlete, even though they won’t play a game until September. This shows a fundamental aspect of the program: Even during offseason, it is still important for each player to give 100 percent during practice.“During the offseason, all the guys enjoy Pinta’s style just as much as Jovan’s, and we are all eager to get better and get ready for the upcoming season,” junior James Walters said.Though Pintaric may yell, he also brings an aura of understanding to each practice, as he has been on the receiving end of all the yelling himself. Before Pintaric was on the coaching staff, he played collegiately for the Trojans in 1997 and 1998. He scored an iconic buzzer beater goal from half the length of the pool to win the 1998 National Championship and was named National Player of the Year. He graduated with a degree in communication and went on to pursue a master’s degree in the same subject.Pintaric, who hails from Zagreb, Croatia, explained that one of the biggest benefits of playing under Vavic is the connection he has with the international players. Only someone who has been a student athlete at USC can understand the difficulty of the task. Since he has experienced both sides, Pintaric has picked up little shortcuts that can help players succeed  in school and water polo.“You face adversity being a student athlete at USC,” Pintaric said. “You are competing with the best kids in the world in the classroom and in the pool. You have to not only be eligible, but you’re also working to win a national championship.”Another perk of playing under Vavic was how much Pintaric learned from him about his coaching philosophy. Pintaric said that Vavic is the most diligent coach he has played for and he has picked up on many of his habits. Vavic is not known to let any pass — let alone practice — slide without scrutiny, and his contagious work ethic was passed along to Pintaric.“Pinta, as a coach, is very good at ironing out all the kinks, especially the little things that we don’t see,” Walters said. “He helps us see things in new ways, like with shooting, passing and different variations of defense.”Since Pintaric began coaching in 1999, his specialty has been coaching the goalies, even though he himself never played the position. The first goalie he coached was still a close friend, as they were on the team together the previous year.“Coaching goalies was completely unknown to me,” Pintaric said. “The position has taught me to look at water polo from a different angle, which has helped my learning curve in any aspect of the game, not just coaching the goalies.”In this year’s Olympics alone, Pintaric has three goalies who he has previously or currently coached participating, representing the United States, Australia and Brazil. In 2012, he had four who represented the United States and Australia.Pintaric tells his players that they must have the right combination of willingness to work hard and love for the game. He encourages them to correct their mistakes and to remember their goals. Pintaric is also constantly looking for new ways to improve his players. He finds that watching endless games of water polo and talking to great goalie coaches has helped him find a technique that works for him.“Their goals are constantly there during training, not just to do well at USC, but to better themselves as humans and to do the best they can,” Pintaric said.Though Pintaric is now co-head coach, he says that Vavic is still the ultimate coach. The program has a meticulous, efficient formula for how the coaching is delegated and it would be unwise to tinker with it too much. However, Vavic has always asked his assistant coaches questions and been open to their advice.Between editing film for the team to watch and administrative responsibilities such as recruiting, Pintaric has proved his ability as a coach. Pintaric said that though this title change will not have many tangible effects, it means that Vavic fully trusts him and thinks he is ready to lead the team.“Being a co-head coach is a very great honor for a prestigious university like USC,” Pintaric said. “My contribution to the team will be more standing time and involvement in the athletics of the game.”The former Trojan knows where his loyalties lie.“I will always consider myself a Trojan,” Pintaric added. “I have been here for 18 years as a water polo player, a graduate student, a graduate assistant, an assistant coach and now as co-head coach.”last_img read more

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Retired managers Joe Torre, Tony La Russa, Bobby Cox named to baseball’s Hall of Fame

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error “It’s a stunner,” said La Russa, revealed he’d like to join a club front office, “I miss the winning and losing. … Some day I’ll be with a team, I think. I’d like to be part of the competition again.”La Russa is third among managers with 2,728 wins; Cox had 2,504 and Torre 2,326.Torre had an unusual experience when he learned of his election from Hall chairman Jane Forbes Clark.“I was always trying to be like blase about this, saying that it’s something I never obsessed about, because I had no control over it,” he explained. “But when the phone call comes and I hung up on Jane Clark the first time she called this morning, not meaning to, but I didn’t have my glasses on it hits you like a sledgehammer.”The trio of retired managers was joined on the 12-man ballot by a pair of much-debated figures who died in recent years: New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner and pioneering players’ union head Marvin Miller. LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. — The winter meetings began with a look back Monday when retired managers Joe Torre, Tony La Russa and Bobby Cox were unanimously elected to the baseball Hall of Fame by the expansion era committee.Torre and Cox retired as managers after the 2010 season and La Russa after leading St. Louis to the 2011 championship. Torre won four World Series titles with the Yankees, La Russa three with Oakland and the Cardinals, and Cox one with Atlanta.“They say when you’re voted to the Hall of Fame your life changes,” Cox said. “And it has. I’ve got goose bumps, and it’s the greatest honor that we could ever have.”Among the nine managers with three or more World Series titles, Torre and La Russa were the only ones not in Cooperstown.center_img Clark said no other candidates received more than six votes.Miller was on a Hall ballot for the sixth time and Steinbrenner for the second.“Over the past fifty years, no individual has come close to matching Marvin’s impact on the sport,” union head Tony Clark said in a statement. “Despite the election results, Marvin’s legacy remains intact, and will only grow stronger, while the credibility of the Hall of Fame continues to suffer.” By the time the vote was announced, the lobby in the Dolphin hotel near Walt Disney World was filled with agents and team officials arriving for the four-day session.Even before the meetings, 42 of 168 major leaguers who became free agents after the World Series already had agreements, with at least seven more deals in the process of being finalized.Since Boston finished off St. Louis for its third title in 10 seasons, Prince Fielder, Ian Kinsler, Doug Fister, Jim Johnson, David Freese and Heath Bell have been traded in a busy swaps market.“It’s not the best free-agent market,” Texas general manager Jon Daniels said, “and so I think that teams realize they weren’t going to be able to fill all of their needs, or wouldn’t necessarily want to fill all of their needs on the open market, and that led to a lot more accelerated trade conversation, and we’re seeing that play out.”Robinson Cano, Jacoby Ellsbury, Joe Nathan, Jhonny Peralta, Tim Hudson and Curtis Granderson are some of the top free agents who have already changed teams.Outfielders Shin-Soo Choo and Nelson Cruz are among the free agents still available, joined by designated hitter Kendrys Morales, shortstop Stephen Drew and pitchers Bronson Arroyo, Bartolo Colon, Matt Garza, Ubaldo Jimenez, Fernando Rodney and Ervin Santana.“It’s a bit like an art auction,” Oakland general manager Billy Beane said. “This is a time the industry is very active, you want to make sure you’re a part of what’s going on so you don’t miss anything.”Cano has the largest package, a yet-to-be-finalized deal said to be worth $240 million over 10 years for the All-Star second baseman.“Nothing should be surprising anymore. Therefore I wasn’t surprised after a moment,” New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson said. “That kind of money has been spent before. The thing about baseball (that) is funny is that all 30 teams are on a continuum and nobody is in the same point psychologically, competitively and financially at any point in time.”After missing the playoffs for only the second time in 19 seasons, the Yankees have been big spenders despite the loss of Cano. New York has committed $307 million to add Ellsbury, Brian McCann, Carlos Beltran and Kelly Johnson and to retain Hiroki Kuroda and Brendan Ryan.“We have enough voids that we don’t have to prioritize any one,” Cashman said.New York also is interested in pitcher Masahiro Tanaka if he is made available by his Japanese team. Major League Baseball and Nippon Professional Baseball have an agreement in principle on a new posting system. If ratified by both sides, there would be a $20 million cap on the fee going to Japanese clubs for players put on the posting market, and any MLB teams bidding the specified price would be able to compete to sign the players.last_img read more

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Rex Ryan escalates feud with Baker Mayfield

first_img“I am just basing things on fact and what I see,” Ryan continued. “I only had 30 years of coaching experience, 20 in the NFL, so I can see where he would question me.”Following the Browns’ 40-25 win over the Ravens on Sunday, Mayfield was asked if Ryan’s comments added any extra motivation. Baker Mayfield says Rex Ryan’s criticism wasn’t motivation to win. pic.twitter.com/7TV5NmHZQi— ESPN (@espn) September 29, 2019Mayfield seems like he’s ready to move on from this saga. Rex Ryan just turned up the heat on his feud with Baker Mayfield.The former Jets coach wore Cleveland Browns colors on “Sunday NFL Countdown,” after the quarterback responded Wednesday to the ESPN analyst calling him “overrated as hell.” “Whatever. In the wise words of Freddie Kitchens, ‘If you don’t wear orange and brown, you don’t matter,’” Mayfield said Wednesday about Ryan’s comments. “Rex Ryan doesn’t have any colors right now for a reason, so it’s OK.”Baker Mayfield: “If you do not wear orange and brown, you do not matter”Rex Ryan: pic.twitter.com/Y8KMV55sDs— Barstool Sports (@barstoolsports) September 29, 2019MORE: Can the Browns flip their season around vs. Ravens? Ryan first sparked the dispute with his comments on Mayfield during Monday’s “First Take.” He added more fuel to the fire on Sunday, telling the quarterback not to be “the weak link” on the Browns.”Baker Mayfield better be happy I’m not in the black and purple today … ’cause he’d be in trouble.”–Rex Ryan responds to Baker Mayfield’s comments pic.twitter.com/FIUKVicqer— ESPN (@espn) September 29, 2019“Baker Mayfield better be happy I’m not in the black and purple today on that sideline, ’cause he’d be in trouble,” Ryan said ahead of the Browns’ game vs. the Ravens. “Here’s one thing I know about Baker Mayfield: Unlike any other quarterback in the National Football League, he’s got two Pro Bowl receivers (Odell Beckham and Jarvis Landry) that he’s throwing to. No other team can say that. They’ve got two of them. By the way, this offensive line that’s been much-maligned, they’re ranked second in pass protection. So I don’t get it. Where’s the correlation? He’s been sacked the [fourth]-most times in the NFL, so something’s not jiving.last_img read more

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