September criminal assizes officially opens today

first_img Share Sharing is caring! 11 Views   no discussions Share Sharecenter_img LocalNews September criminal assizes officially opens today by: – September 26, 2011 Tweet Image via: Lazytechguys.comFour murder trials will be heard when the September criminal assizes begins at the Roseau High Court this morning.The murder trial involving Shane Degallerie who is now on $30,000 bail will surface this week as the September assizes officially begins.Degallerie was indicted for the 2010 killing of 19-year-old Justin Joseph of Fond Cole.The murder trial involving Kenrick Tyson and David St John who are currently in police custody will also get underway.Garvin George who is currently in custody will also have his matter tried during the September assizes.There are several other cases set for the assizes including the State vs Kevin Richards, Kessler Alcendor and Albert Steven Jr. and Jachlene Spliffee Lewis for attempted murder.The manslaughter case involving Stebin Valentine will also be tried.A wounding with intent matter involving Kiwani Jackson and an incident assault matter involving Ramos Auguiste is also down on the cards for trial.Six Notices of Discontinuance have also been filed.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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Water polo promotes new co-head coach

first_imgTwo brains are better than one · After leading the men’s water polo program solo for 21 seasons, Jovan Vavic is promoting long-time assistant and former player Marko Pintaric to a co-coaching position. Daily Trojan file photoThe men’s water polo team has consistently been a dominant force in the pool and is now adding a second head coach to their ranks. Marko Pintaric, recently named co-head coach of the men’s water polo program, adds to this intense atmosphere, joining head coach Jovan Vavic by the pool.During the spring, Pintaric was in full control of the men’s team. While head coach Jovan Vavic would most likely be yelling at the women’s team he also coaches, Pintaric, nicknamed “Pinta” by his players, would be ripping a male athlete, even though they won’t play a game until September. This shows a fundamental aspect of the program: Even during offseason, it is still important for each player to give 100 percent during practice.“During the offseason, all the guys enjoy Pinta’s style just as much as Jovan’s, and we are all eager to get better and get ready for the upcoming season,” junior James Walters said.Though Pintaric may yell, he also brings an aura of understanding to each practice, as he has been on the receiving end of all the yelling himself. Before Pintaric was on the coaching staff, he played collegiately for the Trojans in 1997 and 1998. He scored an iconic buzzer beater goal from half the length of the pool to win the 1998 National Championship and was named National Player of the Year. He graduated with a degree in communication and went on to pursue a master’s degree in the same subject.Pintaric, who hails from Zagreb, Croatia, explained that one of the biggest benefits of playing under Vavic is the connection he has with the international players. Only someone who has been a student athlete at USC can understand the difficulty of the task. Since he has experienced both sides, Pintaric has picked up little shortcuts that can help players succeed  in school and water polo.“You face adversity being a student athlete at USC,” Pintaric said. “You are competing with the best kids in the world in the classroom and in the pool. You have to not only be eligible, but you’re also working to win a national championship.”Another perk of playing under Vavic was how much Pintaric learned from him about his coaching philosophy. Pintaric said that Vavic is the most diligent coach he has played for and he has picked up on many of his habits. Vavic is not known to let any pass — let alone practice — slide without scrutiny, and his contagious work ethic was passed along to Pintaric.“Pinta, as a coach, is very good at ironing out all the kinks, especially the little things that we don’t see,” Walters said. “He helps us see things in new ways, like with shooting, passing and different variations of defense.”Since Pintaric began coaching in 1999, his specialty has been coaching the goalies, even though he himself never played the position. The first goalie he coached was still a close friend, as they were on the team together the previous year.“Coaching goalies was completely unknown to me,” Pintaric said. “The position has taught me to look at water polo from a different angle, which has helped my learning curve in any aspect of the game, not just coaching the goalies.”In this year’s Olympics alone, Pintaric has three goalies who he has previously or currently coached participating, representing the United States, Australia and Brazil. In 2012, he had four who represented the United States and Australia.Pintaric tells his players that they must have the right combination of willingness to work hard and love for the game. He encourages them to correct their mistakes and to remember their goals. Pintaric is also constantly looking for new ways to improve his players. He finds that watching endless games of water polo and talking to great goalie coaches has helped him find a technique that works for him.“Their goals are constantly there during training, not just to do well at USC, but to better themselves as humans and to do the best they can,” Pintaric said.Though Pintaric is now co-head coach, he says that Vavic is still the ultimate coach. The program has a meticulous, efficient formula for how the coaching is delegated and it would be unwise to tinker with it too much. However, Vavic has always asked his assistant coaches questions and been open to their advice.Between editing film for the team to watch and administrative responsibilities such as recruiting, Pintaric has proved his ability as a coach. Pintaric said that though this title change will not have many tangible effects, it means that Vavic fully trusts him and thinks he is ready to lead the team.“Being a co-head coach is a very great honor for a prestigious university like USC,” Pintaric said. “My contribution to the team will be more standing time and involvement in the athletics of the game.”The former Trojan knows where his loyalties lie.“I will always consider myself a Trojan,” Pintaric added. “I have been here for 18 years as a water polo player, a graduate student, a graduate assistant, an assistant coach and now as co-head coach.”last_img read more

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Inside Conditions…We were once

first_imgAUBREY BRUCEHow does it feel to be torn between what you imagine and what is real?  How do you know when to stay or when to go?  When can you discern if this is really death that we call life and who named it so?I feel like I am more there than here.  It’s not death but this treacherous journey called life that I fear.Salvation Blvd awaits the righteous because goodbye here means welcome there where hearts beat without failure and tears.I was once an embryo planted from the loins of one who is truly the son of father time.I was once a fetus nourished by the milk of the antelope and the corn of the Serengeti.I was once a boy prince in the court of Queen Africa with red Egyptian clay between ebony bronzed toes, chasing fireflies laughing at the sun.I was once a young man, watching my mate with bright and grateful eyes as she bore and birthed the fruit of my seed.I am now an old man loving each sunrise more, fearing each sunset less, knowing the difference between life and living, respecting the difference between death and dying, caressing eternity.I was once an embryo planted from the loins of one who is truly the son of father time, I was once.(‘I was once’ written by Aubrey Bruce for the late NYC trumpeter Roy Campbell Jr.,  Rod Woodson, Dwayne, Woodruff, Greg, Lloyd, Joe Greene. the late Dwight White, the late L.C. Greenwood, the late Willie Stargell, the late Roberto Clemente, Franco Harris, Joe Montana, Gale Sayers, and Brett Favre; the list goes on and on…)That time of year is here again, Black History month has been shelved for another year.  Jackie Robinson day and Juneteenth are just around the corner.What is Juneteenth some of you might ask?Well according to Wikipedia.com; “Juneteenth, also known as Juneteenth Independence Day, Freedom Day, or Emancipation Day, is a holiday in the United States that commemorates the announcement of the abolition of slavery in the U.S. state of Texas in 1865.Traditions include public readings of the Emancipation Proclamation.  Celebrations sometimes take the form of parades, rodeos, street fairs, cookouts, family reunions, park parties.Sure we can text, tweet and facebook our butts off but ah for some reason we just keep missing the point. All of the retired and deceased athletes that were aforementioned had one thing in common; they were once all great.We need to celebrate and elevate those who are carrying the torch, as Rev. Al Sharpton would say “rat now.”I know that it feels wonderful, marvelous, even glorious to reflect on past triumphs but sometimes it may become slightly nauseous to feeling that salty taste in ones mouth when one is about to prematurely part ways with that magnanimous and costly steak that one consumed at Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse.  See the steak doesn’t feel as tasty  coming up as it did going down.  So the leftovers from last month are not as tasty as a fresh pot of collard greens and even “frozen vittles” have a negative; it’s called freezer burn.Regurgitating and reliving past events has the same effect on the collective psyche as hearing the same sermon preached over by the same preacher.In many cases a few folk may either cease to attend church or they in the least will change where they worship.  We have to quit. Sometime greatness lasts eternally only in the far recesses of our minds.  All of the parties and celebrations will not bring back the ancestors.  12 years a slave? Try 500 years and counting. We were once embryo’s planted from the loins of those who were truly the sons’ of father time; we were once.Aubrey Bruce can be reached at: abruce@newpittsburghcourier.com or  412.583.6741last_img read more

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Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness

first_imgBy Emma Wulfhorst |SHREWSBURY — People young and old, from different towns, states and even countries, gathered on the lawn outside the historic Allen House, 400 Sycamore Ave. on Tuesday, July 4, for the Monmouth County Historical Association’s (MCHA) 3rd Annual Independence Day Celebration.Tuesday’s joyous event drew a crowd of 400 excited participants, including families from Brooklyn, Philadelphia, and even one seven-year-old girl from Costa Rica who was here visiting her grandmother. Many people chose to stand throughout the entirety of the morning, while others brought chairs and blankets to sit on.The MCHA’s education committee started the annual celebration three years ago as a way to bring the history of the Declaration of Independence to residents in a fun and entertaining way. “We have an education committee of our trustees and they hold their meetings here at the Allen House, which was the Blue Ball Tavern,” explained MCHA president Linda Bricker of Rumson. The tavern operated in the late 1700s to early 1800s. “We always talked about how the tavern was the center of community life, and we imagine that back in the day this is where the community came to get the news about the Declaration of Independence.”In May 2015, MCHA’s recently appointed interim director Chuck Jones, who at the time was the education committee chair, thought, “Why don’t we invite people to come and hear (the Declaration of Independence) and read it out loud?” The committee members questioned whether they could put together such an event on short notice, but were ultimately successful.“That first year, we had very little time to publicize it, but lo and behold we had 200 people show up here at 10 in the morning,” said Bricker. “We knew we had touched a chord with people and that it was worth repeating.”Three years later, the event continues to be a simple but powerful gathering. It features refreshments, served in the form of lemonade and homemade cookies; an invocation, given by Rev. Lisa Mitchell of Christ Church; the singing of the Star-Spangled Banner, performed a-cappella by Rumson student Owen Doherty; and finally the reading of the Declaration of Independence. “People just really enjoyed the simplicity of it,” Bricker said.Participating in the annual event were William Githens of Neptune; and three sisters from Little Silver, Juliet, 6; Noelle, 3; and Carrie Davis, 6.There was also the Pledge of Allegiance and the color guard, performed for the second year in a row by the Rumson Boy Scouts, Troop #201. “It’s the most important day of the year and the Boy Scouts are a big part of Americana,” said the troop’s Scout Master, Andrew Young. “We’re very proud to be here and to celebrate the day.”For the recitation, the Declaration is divided into 31 sections. Each section is read by a different person. The first section was read by Lillian Burry, director of the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders, and the last part by Shrewsbury Mayor Donald Burden. The rest of the readers were chosen at random from those in the crowd.“We want little and big voices,” Bricker said, explaining how they try to choose a diverse group of readers, both young and old, from different places.Some read with gravitas, like Mark Molyneaux, of Fair Haven, who said, “If you’re gonna do it, own it.” Others, like Shrewsbury native Iona Leslie, 11, could barely reach the microphone, but handled the difficult wording of her paragraph with poise and expertise.Two of the younger voices this year were Emma and Abby Bacher, sisters from Philadelphia, who attended Tuesday’s event at the request of their uncle, Gabe Migoyo, of Bradley Beach, who also read a section. Migoyo participated in the celebration last year, and felt it was an important experience for his nieces to have.The audience on Tuesday was quiet yet engaged, listening intently to the words of the Declaration. Some hung their heads or closed their eyes, while others mouthed along, reciting the words in time with the readers at the microphone.“I thought it was really cool getting to listen to something that happened in our country’s past,” said Sonia Sergeant, 14. “I think that it’s really important for kids our age to listen to this type of thing.” Sonia, and her brother Kai, 11, enjoyed their first MCHA Independence Day celebration with their parents. The family lives in Brooklyn but has a summer home in Monmouth Beach.One noticeable difference at this year’s celebration was the upgraded sound system, made possible by the Independence Day Celebration’s first ever sponsors, MCHA trustee, Amy Almasy, and Kim Quigley, from Heritage House Sotheby’s International Realty.The celebration didn’t end after the Declaration of Independence had been read. Attendees were invited to get a close-up view of Christ Church’s treasured 300-year old Vinegar Bible. Published in Oxford, England, it has been in the church’s possession since 1752. The Bible, which is in remarkably good shape, got its unusual name because of a typo for the Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard and is believed to be only one of six that exists.There was also a performance by the Dead Actors’ Guild at Christ Church. The Allen House and the Shrewsbury Historical Society Museum, located across the street in the Shrewsbury Municipal Center, were also open until noon for tours.This area, the intersection of Sycamore Ave. and Broad St./Route 35, is known as the historic Four Corners, because of the significance of the buildings which stand there. The historic Four Corners is comprised of the Allen House, circa 1710; Christ Church, 1702; the Presbyterian Church, 1735; and the Quaker Meeting House, 1672.Robin Blair, vice president of the Shrewsbury Historical Society executive board, was in the Shrewsbury Historical Society’s Museum on Tuesday giving tours, and looking for volunteers. “There are a lot of materials that we need to purge, and a lot of materials which need to go in to archival protection,” Blair said, while discussing the museum’s extensive collection of memorabilia. “We’re looking for grants and time and interested people.”“The reason people want to live here is, it’s not just a beautiful place to live, but it’s a place that’s rich in its own history,” said MCHA interim director Jones, “and those are things that deserve to be preserved and learned about. An event like this is really emblematic of the work we do.”This article was first published in the July 6-13, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Vixens get last laugh against Blueliners, win Icebreaker tourney

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsThe Nelson Blueliners may have won the battle, but the Vernon Vixens won the war.The Central Okanagan squad scored a narrow 3-2 victory over the host Blueliners to claim the top prize at the Icebreaker Women’s Hockey Tournament Sunday at the NDCC Arena.The win came after Nelson defeated Vernon during the round robin action.Danielle Grundy’s third goal of the game coming in the third period proved to be the winner as Vernon held on for the one-goal victory.The teams were tied at 1-1 after one period before Grundy gave Vernon a 2-1 lead after 40 minutes.The teams exchanged goals in the third period.Lauren Strudwick and Rachel Holt scored for Nelson.Saturday, the Blueliners scored two quick goals in the third period to snap a 1-1 tie to defeat the Vixens.In the consolation round Whitefish Whalers scored two third period goals to rally past Trail Chix with Sticks 2-1.Cody McCarthy and Essie Roberts scored in the third.Judi Troman had given Trail a 1-0 advantage after 40 minutes.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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Leaf killer Scott Morriseau sinks Nelson in OT, Rebels one game away from advancing to Murdoch Final

first_imgBy Bruce Fuhr, The Nelson DailyMan that’s playoff hockey — not!In a game that most definitely had coaches Frank Maida and Steve Junker searching the trainer’s room for bottles of Alka-Seltzer to help cure strong cases of acid indigestion, the Castlegar Rebels somehow managed to pull out a 7-6 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League overtime victory Tuesday night at the NDCC Arena.Scott Morriseau, scoring his sixth of the series, won the game in the final minutes of the first overtime period.“I don’t know about that one,” Morriseau responded when asked about if he’s the newest Leaf killer, “but things are definitely going my way right now.”Morriseau deflected a Riley Henderson point shot past a surprised Andrew Walton to give the Rebels a commanding 3-1 lead in the Murdoch Division semi final.Castlegar can eliminate the Leafs from the post-season and advance down the playoff trail against the winner of the Beaver Valley/Spokane series with a win Thursday in the Sunflower City.“I just decided to go straight to the net and luckily the puck went off my stick and into the net,” said Morriseau, describing the game-winner at the 8:55 mark of overtime.The contest did not go according to textbook for both teams.Two teams that combined for 17 goals in three games — only three in game two— scored nine in the opening 20 minutes Tuesday. After building a 2-0 lead on goals by Brendan Heinrich and Stuart Walton 39 seconds apart, the teams traded volleys until Nick Newman finished off the scoring in the final minute of the frame.“We’re not a team that gives up that many goals, especially in the first period,” Morriseau said. “Obviously we talked about that and we have to bare down to next game.”Despite struggling with defensive zone coverage the Leafs battled back — tying the game on a goal by Patrick Martens with 35 seconds remaining in the third period —  and had two or three chances to win the game in the extra period.Nelson now must win three straight games to avoid being eliminated in the first round for the second straight year.“It’s depressing,” said Leaf forward Colton Schell“Everyone is taking it hard in the dressing room. We really needed this game.”The game was a career night for Castlegar rookie Brendan Heinrich, who finished the game with two goals and three assists.Morriseau added had four points while Henderson, Tyler Robinson, Connor Bowen also scored for Castlegar.Max Mois, having a bounce-back game as he continually pounded the Castlegar defence with several crushing bodychecks, Matthew Naka, J.J. Beitel and Carsen Willans, scoring his first career playoff goal, completed the Nelson scoring.Nelson out shot Castlegar by a 44-32 count, including an 18-4 margin in the third period.“It seems (Castlegar) is a way more energized on the bench then we are . . . everyone yelling after big hits, goal or back check,” Schell explained. “Our guys are a lot more quiet . . . we don’t have that many leaders on our team.”Game time Thursday is 7:30 p.m.GAME NOTES: One of the leaders not in the game Schell was talking about was team captain, Tyler Parfeniuk, who along with Walker Sidoni, missed the game due to sickness. Parfeniuk is hopeful to be back in the lineup for game five Thursday while Sidoni is most likely done for the playoffs. . . .The loss of Parfeniuk and Sidoni forced forward Cameron Dobransky back to the blue line core and allowed James Sorrey his first taste of the playoffs after being scratched from the first three games of the series. . . .Aaron Brewer left game in second period after taking a hit by Dallon Stoddart behind Castlegar net. . . .Nelson survived a two-man disadvantage in the second period. . . .Nelson lost the services of Nick Newman five minutes into the third after being checked to into the boards by Braydon Horcoff, who was given a five-minute major. Newman did return after being attended by the Leaf training staff. . . .Branden Amatto stopped 49 of 51 shots to lead the Spokane Braves to a 3-2 win over Beaver Valley Nitehawks. The Hawks lead the series 3-1 and can eliminate the Braves Thursday in Fruitvale.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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