Men’s volleyball takes two of three in its first tournament of the season

first_imgThe Trojans traveled to Honolulu over the weekend, kicking off their 50th season with two victories and one loss at the Hawaiian Airlines Rainbow Warrior Classic. The tournament began on Thursday with a 3-0 victory over the Concordia University Eagles. Redshirt senior captain Jack Wyett and senior captain Gianluca Grasso led the offense with 15 and 10 kills, respectively. Senior outside hitter Ryan Moss and redshirt sophomore setter Matt Faraimo contributed eight and seven kills, respectively. “When you’re in an environment like that with thousands of people, you can get the jitters a little bit, and that was our first real test of the year,” Douglas said. “They were really good. I don’t think we were able to match their level of execution, but it was the first tournament of the season, and we have a long way to go.” Senior outside hitter Gianluca Grasso led the team with 10 kills and two aces against Hawaii on Saturday. (Ling Luo/Daily Trojan) Despite the loss, Douglas said he thought the team did well facing a hostile crowd. The Trojans are now 2-1 for the season. They will travel to Lebanon, Tenn., this weekend to compete in the Off The Block Grow the Game Challenge. On Friday, they take on Lincoln Memorial at 5 p.m. PST.  On Saturday, they will face Barton at 2:30 p.m. PST. On Sunday, they play Lindenwood at 2:30 p.m. PST. All games will be available to stream on the Cumberland Sports Network. “I thought we did a good job sticking together in a foreign environment with not many fans rooting for us,” he said. “We had to really galvanize, make sure we were there for each other and be engaged the whole time.” The momentum continued on Friday as the Trojans defeated the New Jersey Institute Highlanders 3-1 in a 25-17, 24-26, 25-23, 25-15 match. Moss led the offense with 15 kills and contributed significantly on defense with eight digs and four blocks. Sophomore setter Chris Hall and sophomore libero Cole Paxson each had nine digs of their own.center_img Despite wins on Thursday and Friday, USC fell to No. 4 Hawaii on Saturday in a 12-25, 23-25, 16-25 match. Junior opposite Rado Parapunov and senior outside hitter/opposite Stijn Van Tilburg led the Warriors with 16 and 15 kills, respectively. Beyond that, the Trojans spent a lot of time in the week leading up to the tournament scouting their opponents and preparing accordingly. When it came time to execute, coaches emphasized that the team’s effort would pay off. “We worked extremely hard all off-season and all preseason, so they let us know that we were ready to go, we deserved to be out there and to give it all we have,” Douglas said. Grasso led the Trojan offense with 10 kills and two aces, while Douglas led the defense with 11 digs. USC put up a strong fight throughout the match and managed to pick up a 10-9 lead in the second set. The Warriors pulled ahead again before the Trojans narrowed the margin back to 23-22, but ultimately let it slip to a 25-23 set. The Trojans maintained strong leads in each of the three sets against the Eagles with scores of 25-14, 25-18, 25-14. USC will see Concordia again later in the season in Mountain Pacific Sports Federation conference play. Because it was the first tournament of the season, the Trojans focused on team building. Senior libero Matt Douglas said the weekend was an opportunity for upperclassmen to teach their younger teammates “how to conduct business on and off the court.” last_img read more

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Oxford study: Tokyo Olympics are most costly Summer Games

first_img First Published: 4th September, 2020 10:05 IST Associated Press Television News SUBSCRIBE TO US COMMENT LIVE TV WATCH US LIVEcenter_img Written By The Tokyo Olympics are already the most expensive Summer Games on record with costs set to go higher, a wide-ranging study from Britain’s University of Oxford indicates.The Tokyo cost overrun already exceeds 200%, lead author Bent Flyvbjerg explained in an interview with The Associated Press. This is even before several billion more dollars are added on from the one-year delay from the COVID-19 pandemic.Flyvbjerg is an economist at Oxford’s Said Business School. His entire study is available here , and it’s set to be published on Sept. 15 in the journal “Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space.” It’s titled “Regression to the Tail: Why the Olympics Blow Up.”Tokyo, postponed until July 23, 2021, is only a small part of the focus. The study — the third in a series following editions 2012 and 2016 — looks at Olympic costs since 1960 and finds they keep increasing despite claims by the International Olympic Committee that costs are being cut.Flyvbjerg cites many reasons for the rising costs and cost overruns, and offers solutions for the IOC. The vast majority of costs are picked up by governments with the IOC contributing only a small portion.“The Olympics offer the highest level of risk a city can take on,” Flyvbjerg told AP. “The trend cannot continue. No city will want to do this because it’s just too expensive, putting themselves into a debt that most cities cannot afford.”In his paper, Flyvbjerg cites Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, whose city is to hold the 2028 Olympics following Paris in 2024.“Most cities, unless you have a government that’s willing to go into debt or pay the subsidy of what this costs, most cities will never say ‘yes’ to the Olympics again unless they find the right model,” he quotes Garcetti as saying.By the right model, Garcetti means lower costs.Tracking Olympic costs is difficult, a dense maze of overlap and debate. Politicians and organizers always argue over what are — and what are not — Olympic expenses.Flyvbjerg writes: “Unfortunatley, Olympics officials and hosts often misinform about the costs and cost overruns of the Games. … We therefore cannot count on organizers, the IOC, and governments to provide us with reliable information about the real costs, cost overruns, and cost risks of the Olympic Games.”Flyvbjerg looks only at costs to operate the games — the operating costs and capital costs — the cost to build sports venues. He leaves out a third category, which is usually many times larger: renovating roads, building airports, and what he calls “sprucing up projects,” which also fall to taxpayers.“Our estimates are conservative because there are lots of costs that are hidden that we can’t get into,” Flyvbjerg said. “And there are lots of costs we decided not to include because it’s too complex. We include the things we can get the most reliable numbers for and we do it in the same way for each city that we study.”He also excludes the cost of debt, and the future cost of running sports venues after the Olympics leave, and inflation.According to the Oxford numbers. Tokyo’s spending is at $15.84 billion, already surpassing the 2012 London Olympics, which were the most expensive summer games to date at $14.95 billion. He expects several billion more from the cost of the one-year delay.Tokyo organizers say officially they are spending $12.6 billion. However, a national auditor says the actual costs are twice that high, made up of some expenses that the Oxford study omits because they are not constant between different Olympics.Tokyo said the cost would be $7.3 billion when it won the bid in 2013.“They (IOC) obviously don’t like our results, but it’s very difficult to counter a piece of rigorous research like this,” Flyvbjerg said. “And they haven’t done that, and they can’t do that. Our research is a problem for them.”In an email to Associated Press, the IOC said it had not seen the latest Oxford study and declined to comment.It referenced another study by Mainz and Sorbonne universities.This study also found Olympic cost overruns but said they were in line with other large-scale projects. Flyvbjerg’s study finds they are not.Flyvbjerg said he has been in touch on and off with the IOC and had sent a colleague to an IOC workshop. He said a major reason for the rising costs is that the IOC does not pay for them. He also cited rising security costs, and moving the games around the world. He calls this the “Eternal Beginner Syndrome” with new host cities starting basically from scratch.He’s said the IOC has tried recently to rein in costs, but the effort is “too little, too late.”“They (IOC) define the specs but don’t pay for them,”Flyvbjerg said. “This is pretty similar to you and I giving the specs for a house that we are going to live in, but we don’t have to pay for it. How do you think we’d spend? We’d gold-plate it. This is what has happened over time.”Flyvbjerg said he’s relish a chance to sit and talk with IOC President Thomas Bach. He calls himself a fan of the Olympics.”It’s not that the IOC hasn’t been willing to talk, or I am not willing to talk,”he said. “We certainly are. We have communicated in writing to keep the IOC informed. But yes, we would like to sit down with Thomas Bach.”Image credits: AP Last Updated: 4th September, 2020 10:05 IST Oxford Study: Tokyo Olympics Are Most Costly Summer Games The Tokyo Olympics are already the most expensive Summer Games on record with costs set to go higher, a wide-ranging study from Britain’s University of Oxford indicates FOLLOW USlast_img read more

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Heres a quick glance at unemployment rates for March by province

first_imgOTTAWA – Canada’s national unemployment rate was 5.8 per cent in March. Here are the jobless rates last month by province (revised numbers from the previous month in brackets):— Newfoundland and Labrador 14.2 per cent (14.0)— Prince Edward Island 10.3 (10.1)— Nova Scotia 7.4 (7.9)— New Brunswick 8.0 (8.2)— Quebec 5.6 (5.6)— Ontario 5.5 (5.5)— Manitoba 6.2 (5.9)— Saskatchewan 5.8 (5.6)— Alberta 6.3 (6.7)— British Columbia 4.7 (4.7)last_img

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