Legalising medicinal marijuana leads to increase in social security disability claims (US)

first_imgSurprising medical marijuana side effect: More people claiming disabilityMarketWatch 25 September 2017Family First Comment: “Expanding marijuana access has negative spillover effects to costly social programs that disincentive work.”It’s called dope for a reason – especially when it’s smoked and not proven to have medical benefit.Medical marijuana laws are becoming more popular across the country, but legalizing the drug for medicinal purposes can have a major unintended consequence.State medical marijuana laws lead to an increase in the probability that people will make Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) claims, according to a new working paper from researchers at Temple University, Johns Hopkins University and the University of Cincinnati. The tendency to make an SSDI claim rose 9.9% following the passage of a medical marijuana law, while actual SSDI benefits rose by 2.6%. The report, which was distributed by the National Bureau of Economic Research, used data from the Current Population Survey by the Bureau of Labor Statistics to produce its findings.The researchers also studied the effect state laws on medical marijuana had on workers’ compensation (WC) claims. While their analysis did not produce any statistically significant evidence on these claims, the researchers said the data suggested generally that the laws do cause an increase. “Expanding marijuana access has negative spillover effects to costly social programs that disincentive work,” the researchers wrote.Consequently, medical marijuana laws could have a major impact on these already-costly social insurance programs were they to become even more prevalent. So far, 30 states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana to treat a host of illnesses ranging from cancer and glaucoma to chronic pain disorders and epilepsy. As of 2016, the SSDI and workers’ compensation programs cost the government and employers roughly $208 billion annually.And while older adults are more likely to suffer from many of the conditions medical marijuana is prescribed for, they aren’t more likely to file a disability claim. The researchers reported no statistically significant evidence that medical marijuana laws resulted in a change in benefits claims among older adults between the ages of 41 and 62. That wasn’t true of their younger peers between the ages of 23 and 40. For them, the passage of medical marijuana laws led to a 24% increase in the probability of making SSDI claims and a 15% increase in the likelihood of workers’ compensation claims.READ MORE: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/legalizing-medical-marijuana-leads-to-an-increase-in-social-security-disability-claims-2017-09-25last_img read more

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Mourinho respect for Van Gaal

first_imgJose Mourinho has “deep respect” for new Manchester United manager Louis van Gaal – but the Chelsea boss is not concerned about their impending rivalry. The pair worked together for three years at Barcelona but will go head-to-head this season, with Van Gaal having taken the reins at Old Trafford following a successful World Cup with Holland. He has also won titles in Spain, Holland and Germany with Barca, Ajax and Bayern Munich, and said at his introductory press conference that he is aiming to add England to that list. Mourinho – whose Inter Milan side beat Van Gaal’s Bayern in the 2010 Champions League final – and Chelsea will be among the main rivals standing in his way. And the Portuguese told the Mail on Sunday: “I’m not worried about him being here. I look forward to playing against United. Nothing worries me. “I watched him at his press conference and he was pure Van Gaal – honest and open, the way he always is. “He is a very, very good coach, he’ll be great for Manchester United. “We are both great coaches. It’s what we were born to do. “Louis was the best coach in the World Cup and he is a good friend – really, a friend for life. I have deep respect for this man. “He is in the best period of his career. With coaching, if you deal with winning and losing in the right way, you improve. He analyses every experience. He has got better and better.” Van Gaal begins his Premier League career against Swansea on August 16, two days before Chelsea open their campaign against promoted Burnley. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Extra Innings: Too many athletes are transferring out of USC

first_imgFor most players, the reasoning behind this wave of potential transfers is not clear. When McCoy decided to transfer, I wrote in a previous column, “Five-star receivers want to go to a university to do a few things: win football games, get better under great coaches and get noticed by professional scouts. Right now, USC offers only one of those three things and it isn’t the first two.” In this week’s installment of “What the Hell is Happening to USC Athletics?”: the transfer portal. This week, almost half of USC’s women’s basketball team entered the transfer portal. Six of the 13-person roster are at least considering — if not set on — leaving Galen Center. Granted, there are two graduate transfers in that group of players, but a daunting statistic nonetheless. USC Athletics needs to make some serious changes soon to retain players. For players to leave USC at such a rapid rate from multiple sports is not a good look for recruits of any sport. After all, when the players leave, the recruits stop coming. I’m not going to pretend I follow collegiate basketball. However, I do know that the women considering jumping ship are some of USC’s best ballers. But this issue isn’t unique to women’s basketball. Rather, it is evidence of a larger issue that has been perpetuated over the past year. Student-athletes keep transferring out of USC. Some of the most notable are redshirt junior receivers Velus Jones Jr. and Trevon Sidney. Jones posted a solid 10.4 yards per reception in 2018. He was a fantastic addition to USC’s receiving core last year. Sidney, on the other hand, didn’t have a whole lot of targets but showed great potential. It’s also important to note that Sidney was left off the spring roster. Jones is listed. Under offensive coordinator Graham Harrell’s air-raid offense, both receivers have the potential to be key players for USC next season, if they decide to stay. Those two potential transfers are just drops of water in the ocean of players that continue to enter the transfer portal. For most in the portal, their intentions are not clear. Perhaps, they are just keeping their options open this spring. center_img Some of my past thoughts hold validity. At least USC has an offensive coordinator now, but if I had to assume the reasoning behind this ordeal, players are unhappier with the athletic department than they are concerned with winning. Considering either the coaching staff or the administration, can you blame them? It’s a mess, and there is a whole lot to be upset about right now. Senior guard Minyon Moore, one of the graduate transfers who announced she will be transferring, led the Trojans in points, free throws, rebounds, assists and steals this past season. Senior forward Ja’Tavia Tapley also plans to transfer. She posted the second most blocks and rebounds during the 2018-19 season. How could anyone forget about one of the most interesting and jaw-dropping transfers of this spring? Incoming receiver Bru McCoy enrolled at USC early. It seemed like he was all in, ready to join receiving leaders senior Michael Pittman Jr. and sophomore Amon-Ra St. Brown to terrorize secondaries. Then, out of nowhere, he entered the transfer portal and became a Texas Longhorn just days later. You don’t need to look far to see that this is a major problem with USC football. News of players transferring has been dominating the USC football headlines for the past several months. But some might argue that players transfer all the time. However, a significant portion of the players entering the portal aren’t third string; they are the starters and the impact players USC needs. Sam Arslanian is a sophomore writing about sports. His column, “Extra Innings,” runs Fridays.last_img read more

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