Final destination – Cornwall defeat Clarendon 2-1 for first final appearance since 2001

first_img It was overall a disappointing display from Clarendon, with little urgency shown in the final third. They had three attempts on target in the first half, with Charlton coming agonisingly close in the 15th minute. Then in the 31st minute, the Clarendon aggregation had a shout for penalty ignored by referee Danion Parchment, as the ball cannoned off a Cornwall player inside the area. Clarendon College’s team manager, Richard Palmer, attributed the loss partly to referee’s decisions, which, he said, never went his team’s way. “We are just disappointed that the penalty was not given. It was plain that the player handled the ball inside the area, but we are happy to have come this far but regret that the journey had to end like this,” Palmer said. Cornwall’s opponents in the final will be known this afternoon when defending champions St Elizabeth Technical tackle Lennon High at the Manchester High School ground at 2:30 p.m. POOR DISPLAY WESTERN BUREAU: Cornwall College reached their first daCosta Cup final in 15 years when they clipped Clarendon College 2-1 in the ISSA-FLOW semi-final yesterday at St Elizabeth Technical Giovanni Reid and Aiden Jkombo were on target for Cornwall, who had to withstand a late charge from Clarendon, during which time Creggton Charlton managed to score. Playing without the influence of Peter-Lee Vassell, who later entered the fray as a second-half substitute, and with Jourdaine Fletcher not yet warmed to the occasion, it was left to Reid to provide Cornwall’s first threat. He was first to meet a Fletcher corner-kick, outjumping the Clarendon defenders around him to flash a powerful header into the net in the sixth minute. But when Charlton, who looked dangerous, particularly in the first half, was allowed to sneak a cross that was drilled into the area to equalise in the 85th minute, many thought the game would again go to the wire. But then in the 87th minute, the supremely talented Vassell took charge. He darted into the area, drawing the attention of two Clarendon College defenders, and when he was challenged, the ball ran loose to Jkomba, who beat Benjamin Williams in the Clarendon goal. It was a fine victory for Cornwall as they marked a wonderful campaign without a defeat in the daCosta Cup. They have only lost twice all season, once to Lennon in the Ben Francis Cup and to Wolmer’s Boys in the FLOW Super Cup final. “The match went according to plan except for the Clarendon College late goal, but we showed determination to score late on ourselves to clinch a good win,” Dr Dean Weatherly, Cornwall College head coach, said.last_img read more

Read More →

Friendship 2nd phase sea defence project commences

first_imgThe second phase of the sea defence project at Friendship, East Bank Demerara, that will extend the project by 120 metres, has commenced. The extension starts from Friendship and heads north.Senior District Engineer, Sea and River Defence Department, Ministry of Public Infrastructure, Maitland Stewart told the Government Information Agency (GINA), that the first phase of the project commenced in 2014. He said 375 metres of rip-rap defence were done on the defence adjacent to Garden of Eden.The team of workers, Stewart pointed out, has already cleared the area and is ready to commence work. The project will see the continuation of rip-rap sea defence with timber pilings being used to stabilise the structure and a rock armour slope: “The contractors will use a timber revetment; a timber toe, then they’ll come up with the armour layer, armour surface protection, then do the earthen embankment.”Toe pilings are sharpened poles driven next to the upstream face of the mudsills of a dam to prevent water from seeping under theContractors working on the Friendship sea defence projectfoundation. Armour toes are rocks used for river revetment.The project is being funded to the cost of $50 million from the ministry’s 2016 budget, and is expected to be completed within six months.The extension comes in wake of the loss of the natural sea defence. “We have lost most of the natural defences such as mangrove …due to erosion … so we’re putting in a new permanent structure and rip-rap is the most plausible solution for the condition we’re in right now,” the engineer explained.last_img read more

Read More →