Final destination – Cornwall defeat Clarendon 2-1 for first final appearance since 2001

first_img It was overall a disappointing display from Clarendon, with little urgency shown in the final third. They had three attempts on target in the first half, with Charlton coming agonisingly close in the 15th minute. Then in the 31st minute, the Clarendon aggregation had a shout for penalty ignored by referee Danion Parchment, as the ball cannoned off a Cornwall player inside the area. Clarendon College’s team manager, Richard Palmer, attributed the loss partly to referee’s decisions, which, he said, never went his team’s way. “We are just disappointed that the penalty was not given. It was plain that the player handled the ball inside the area, but we are happy to have come this far but regret that the journey had to end like this,” Palmer said. Cornwall’s opponents in the final will be known this afternoon when defending champions St Elizabeth Technical tackle Lennon High at the Manchester High School ground at 2:30 p.m. POOR DISPLAY WESTERN BUREAU: Cornwall College reached their first daCosta Cup final in 15 years when they clipped Clarendon College 2-1 in the ISSA-FLOW semi-final yesterday at St Elizabeth Technical Giovanni Reid and Aiden Jkombo were on target for Cornwall, who had to withstand a late charge from Clarendon, during which time Creggton Charlton managed to score. Playing without the influence of Peter-Lee Vassell, who later entered the fray as a second-half substitute, and with Jourdaine Fletcher not yet warmed to the occasion, it was left to Reid to provide Cornwall’s first threat. He was first to meet a Fletcher corner-kick, outjumping the Clarendon defenders around him to flash a powerful header into the net in the sixth minute. But when Charlton, who looked dangerous, particularly in the first half, was allowed to sneak a cross that was drilled into the area to equalise in the 85th minute, many thought the game would again go to the wire. But then in the 87th minute, the supremely talented Vassell took charge. He darted into the area, drawing the attention of two Clarendon College defenders, and when he was challenged, the ball ran loose to Jkomba, who beat Benjamin Williams in the Clarendon goal. It was a fine victory for Cornwall as they marked a wonderful campaign without a defeat in the daCosta Cup. They have only lost twice all season, once to Lennon in the Ben Francis Cup and to Wolmer’s Boys in the FLOW Super Cup final. “The match went according to plan except for the Clarendon College late goal, but we showed determination to score late on ourselves to clinch a good win,” Dr Dean Weatherly, Cornwall College head coach, said.last_img read more

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Basil Williams creating fear with “unrest” prediction

first_img…wants to delay elections but could be self-fulfillingIn light of a recent statement by Attorney General Basil Williams about “unrest” which might follow if the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) rules against the Government with regards to the validity of the No-Confidence Motion, President of the Georgetown Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GCCI), Nicholas Boyer believes that the comment was a “dangerous one” and is seen as a tool to prevent the Government from going to the polls sooner rather than later.GCCI President Nicholas BoyerBoyer on Sunday related that the AG should be more cautious about using sentiments that are attributed to riot or other forms of unrest during an election period.“Some might say it could be self-fulfilling prophecies…Guyana has come a long way as a democracy and I don’t think the younger generations expect or will participate in elections violence, I think the younger generations if they feel a need to, will peacefully protest. I think that the AG is trying to create fear using that as a weak means of supporting their claims of why elections should be further delayed,” he stated.According to the GCCI President, the proprietors and staff of businesses in Guyana have not forgotten the physical destruction and crimes that occurred during some elections in previous years while noting that in today’s society, it is not expected that there will be such a repeat.Attorney General Basil Williams“[Businesses] are expecting that as a democracy we have moved past riots. International investors will be looking on and I feel that the older heads who were the generations that rioted will have to be mindful and choose to change their modus operandi. If they want to see a new and better Guyana that we all look forward to.”On Thursday last, the AG had asked that the CCJ confirm the decision of Guyana’s Court of Appeal in relation to the question of the votes being required for the validity of the passage of the No-Confidence Motion to be 34 votes in the National Assembly as against 33.In his submissions to the court on Thursday, he also reiterated that “the principle is, the majority cannot be the same for simple and in absolute”. In this argument, the coalition Government presented that given the fact that there is no half human or half vote, one had to be added to make it 34 for an absolute rather than a simple majority in Guyana’s 65-member Parliament.Caribbean Court of Justice“The provisions in Section 106 (7) and 106 (7) of Guyana’s Constitution have dire consequences, catastrophic consequences for Government. If successful, the motion could lead to the premature fall of the Government and possibly the premature disillusion of the National Assembly,” Williams told the Court in his submissions.In relation to elections being held in Guyana, the AG noted that the country’s history has seen some unrest and aftermaths. He said that this could be repeated if an election is held in Guyana without the proper steps in place.“That is the difficulty that we have. And which the Court, we are asking to take judicial notice of, that around elections if the list is not right, if there is a perception of people multiple voting, phantoms etc and the list is not a credible list, it is going to be difficult and that is the history of Guyana.”AG Williams added that the second highest court in the land had already spoken on this issue and, therefore, urged that the CCJ rule in that light as well.The Court of Appeal, in March last, had ruled in a 2-1 split decision, that a majority of 34 votes would have been needed to validly pass a motion brought against the Government.last_img read more

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Visa issues threaten Huntington garden

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SAN MARINO – For the construction of its new 12-acre Chinese Garden, The Huntington Library is importing key materials from China, including hand-crafted lattice windows, roof tiles and sculptural rocks. But operating in a post-9/11 world, it is now in the midst of a struggle to obtain another key element: Chinese craftsmen skilled at stone-carving.The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has denied applications for temporary exchange visas for 11 Suzhou artisans.Originally scheduled to arrive this month, the stone-carvers are needed to create bridges for the garden.“There is a lot of training and apprenticeships involved. It’s an expertise and craftsmanship you can’t find here,” said Laurie Sowd, operations director for The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens. “We really wanted that authentic feel for the garden.” Sowd said she received a standard letter of notification and is appealing the decision.The update was announced as part of a San Marino City Council meeting Friday with overseers and senior staff from The Huntington. The joint meeting marked the first time the library’s master plan was presented publicly. Officials said applications for a temporary cultural exchange visa for the craftsmen were submitted in the spring.According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Web site, the “Q” visa is for “the purpose of providing practical training and employment, and the sharing of the history, culture, and traditions of the participant’s home country in the United States.”Created in 2003, the USCIS is part of the Department of Homeland Security. The agency performs some functions formerly done by the now-defunct U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, which was part of the Department of Justice.The visa application is complicated by the fact that the artisans would technically be employees of contractors, though sponsored by The Huntington, an educational and research institute. The craftsmen would stay for about 2 1/2 months to design and install the stonework. It is important to have the work done on-site so other design elements, such as vistas, could be incorporated, Sowd said.Later, when work on pavilions was done, more artisans would be brought in for a longer period of time. The Portland Classical Chinese Garden in Oregon has had similar visa troubles. Two years ago, a group of musicians was denied visas and unable to perform at the garden, said Gloria Lee, executive director of the Portland garden, which was constructed in 1999. Lee said she had noticed a marked difference in the handling of visa applications since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Meanwhile, construction continues with other aspects of The Huntington’s Chinese Garden.Phase one consists of a three-acre Summer Garden. So far, the outline of a one-acre lake has been dug out and footing for a tea house and bridges have been put in.“It looks simply like dirt has been moved around, but it’s so much more than that,” said Huntington spokeswoman Susan Turner-Lowe.The infrastructure for the garden is especially complicated because traditional Chinese architecture has to be adapted for a seismically active area. An “unbelievable amount of engineering” has also gone into water management in the form of retaining walls and pumps for the lake, Turner-Lowe said. Water will stream to the existing Japanese Garden and back.To date, $10 million has been raised for the Summer Garden. Construction on pavilions will begin after another $5 million has been raised. The garden will open temporarily after the lake area is completed; the entire garden is scheduled for completion around 2008.“It’s a complicated project and there are things that come up to make it more complicated,” Turner-Lowe said.“It is the most ambitious project in the last 10 years. We hope it will be a center for the Chinese diaspora.” patricia.ho@sgvn.com(626) 578-6300, Ext. 4586last_img read more

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