In the news today March 9

first_imgFive stories in the news for Friday, March 9———TRUDEAU TO NAME NEW RCMP BOSS IN REGINAPrime Minister Justin Trudeau has a busy schedule in Regina today, including the naming of a new RCMP commissioner. Sources say the prime minister will name Brenda Lucki to the post during an event at the force’s “Depot” training academy. Trudeau is also set to deliver remarks at a library about parental leave measures in last week’s federal budget, and he’ll meet with new Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe. Last night, Trudeau told supporters at a fundraiser that Canada needs to do more to help Indigenous people.———COURT TO HEAR ARGUMENT TO EXTEND ONT. PC LEADERSHIP RACEA Toronto lawyer representing a disenfranchised member of Ontario’s Progressive Conservative Party says he’s taken legal action in an effort to extend the party’s leadership race. Jeffrey Radnoff says the Superior Court of Justice is scheduled to hear his application for an injunction this morning, just hours before voting in the contentious race was scheduled to end. The party ruled against prolonging the race late Wednesday, saying that would contravene its constitution. But Radnoff said in an email late Thursday that his client, along with a “significant number” of party members, had not received a personal identification number allowing him to vote.———B.C. JUDGE TO RELEASE POLYGAMY DECISIONA judge in British Columbia is scheduled to hand down a decision today in a constitutional challenge of Canada’s polygamy laws. Winston Blackmore and James Oler were found guilty last July of having multiple wives, but they argue the law infringes on their rights to freedom of religion and expression. Blackmore has been found guilty of marrying two dozen women, while Oler was found to have five wives. The convictions have not been entered pending the outcome of the constitutional arguments.———CHAMPAGNE TO ANNOUNCE NEW TRADE TALKSInternational Trade Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne is in Paraguay today, where he’s set to announce the start of free trade talks with the Mercosur group of South American countries. Officials say negotiations with the bloc — which also includes Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay — could begin within the next 10 days. But experts say striking a deal won’t be easy, as Brazil and Argentina have been reluctant to talk free-trade with Canada in the past.———‘LOVEWINS’ CONCERT FACES BACKLASH FROM LGBTQ COMMUNITYOrganizers of a concert billed as “part vigil, part celebration” in the wake of the arrest of an alleged serial killer have responded to some of the concerns raised by members of Toronto’s LGBTQ community. LoveWins is a free music event planned for March 29, with a lineup that features Carole Pope and members of the Barenaked Ladies. Critics say the plans are tone deaf regarding what’s actually happening in Toronto’s LGBTQ community, as police continue to seek answers about a man who allegedly targeted gay men in the city for years. A poster promoting the concert was taken down from the event’s Facebook page Thursday night.———ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY:— Statistics Canada releases the labour force survey for February and the industrial capacity utilization rates for the fourth quarter— Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer attends the Canada – United Kingdom Chamber of Commerce roundtable in London.— Finance Minister Bill Morneau delivers remarks and discusses the federal budget at New York’s Penn Club.— A Halifax judge will deliver his decision in the case of two men charged with manipulating the price of Knowledge House Inc. shares on the Toronto Stock Exchange.— The Paralympic Winter Games opening ceremony takes place in Pyeongchang. Cross-country skier Brian McKeever will be Canada’s flag bearer.last_img read more

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Concerned about methylmercury at Muskrat Falls Eat less fish says Newfoundland Liberal

first_imgAPTN National News With people on hunger strikes and many more protesting the expected flooding of the Muskrat Falls reservoir in Labrador over concerns of toxic levels of methylmercury, a Liberal MP for St. John’s East says he has a solution to calm everyone’s fears.MP Nick Whalen said when flooding occurs and methylmercury (MeHg) levels rise with the water people should stop fishing.Whalen made that statement on Twitter responding to NDP Leader Earle McCurdy’s comments to media that the government needs to make it mandatory to clear vegetation and soil from the hydroelectric project.“That is ridiculous. Just measure MeHg levels, eat less fish while MeHg are too high, and compensate,” he tweeted on Sunday.APTN called Whalen’s Ottawa office for comment but a spokesperson said he wasn’t immediately available and hoped to return the call later Monday.But Whalen’s tweet, and subsequent comments made on Twitter were already making the rounds.Timmins-James Bay NDP MP Charlie Angus accused Whalen of mocking Indigenous people who have strongly opposed the project and future concerns over poisoning.“Liberal @nickwhelanmp mocks indigenous people facing mercury contamination #muskratfalls. Tells them to eat less fish. Nation2nation???,” he tweeted Sunday.The tweet also started a long conversation on Twitter about treaty rights and Aborginal rights.Clint Davis, vice-president of TD Bank’s Aboriginal business group,  wrote; “How do u compensate for loss of Aboriginal right to fish?”The planned flooding has spurred the #MakeMuskratRight movement.Innu and Inuit leaders occupy the offices of Nalcor, the Crown corporation spearheading the Muskrat Falls project 30 kilometres west of Happy Valley Goose Bay.Billy Gauthier, an Inuk artist is in his second week of a water-only hunger strike along with two others who are consuming only broth.At a rally attended by about 100 people on Sunday in Ottawa, all three said they were willing to die to ensure that the Muskrat Falls project does not harm their ability to live off the land now and in the future.On Friday, protesters ignored court ordered injunction of blocking the gates to the Muskrat Falls construction site and formed a blockade around it.Supporters of the project believe the lower Churchill River near Happy Valley-Goose Bay in Labrador would free the province from volatile, oil-fired energy costs.news@aptn.calast_img read more

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Dam partnership has not changed nature of hydro development in Nisichaswayasihk say

first_imgJustin BrakeAshley BrandsonAPTN NewsNelson House, home to the Nisichawayasi Nehethowuk, sits along the north shore of Footprint Lake, about 700 kilometres north of Winnipeg, 500 from Hudson Bay, and at the convergence of the Footprint, Rat and Burntwood Rivers.For the members of Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation (NCN), it’s also the epicentre of one of the greatest events to impact their identity and way of life.Their ancestors have made the lands around the convergence of the three rivers their home for thousands of years, where they fished the bountiful waters and hunted and trapped the vast, hilly landscape.The local land-based economy evolved through settlers’ expansion into the area, which included the establishment of North West Company and Hudson Bay trading posts in the region in the late 1700s and early 1800s.One hundred years later a Roman Catholic day school was built, one run by individuals who locals have claimed in recent years sexually abused them. The school was part of the church and state’s wider effort to assimilate Indigenous children into Canadian society.Despite the disruptions to their lives, the Nisichawayasi Nehethowuk still hunted and fished for themselves, their families, kin and community well into the 20th century.But in the 1970s hydro development posed a new threat. One that didn’t target the people, or animals, but rather the thing the people and the animals depend on — the water.Displaced by HydroCarol Kobliski is 53 years old.She grew up on a small island in the middle of Footprint Lake and remembers the day Manitoba Hydro showed up at the door.“They came to our cabin and told my mom and dad they had to move off the island,” she recalled in a recent phone interview with APTN News.Kobliski said her family was offered $2,000 for the loss of their home, and that five other families in the area were forced to relocate to accommodate Hydro’s massive re-engineering of the lands and waters of the region — the Churchill River Diversion (CRD).The CRD effectively increased the output of water from the Churchill River system into the Nelson River. The Missi Falls control structure near South Indian Lake and the Notigi control structure just west of Nelson House control the flow of water out of the Churchill and into the Rat and Burntwood Rivers, which eventually flow into the Nelson.But along the path of these human-made channels and control structures are communities like Nelson House.And families like Kobliski’s.“We all had to move back on to the reserve with no home, nowhere to live, and we were scattered all over the community with relatives,” she recalls. “That’s how I grew up.”“Everything we ate came from the land”Nelson House is also home to Ramona Neckoway, who has been leading the Wa Ni Ska Tan alliance’s sixth annual tour of hydro-impacted communities and helping her people network and learn how hydro development has affected others in the region.Wa Ni Ska Tan means, “to wake up, or to rise up” in Cree, she explained to APTN on the first day of the trip.As such, a big part of the group’s mandate is not only research-oriented, but also advocacy and solutions-oriented, she said. Wa Ni Ska Tan, in working with community members, is exploring ways to help understand and mitigate the impacts of hydro development, whether it’s through funding research or land-based activities in communities, or hosting letter-writing events.At the tail-end of their trip north, Neckoway brings her Wa Ni Ska Tan colleagues to Nelson House.She grew up after the CRD so doesn’t know what it was like to have access to clean drinking water straight out of the lake.Standing on a dock behind her auntie’s house on the edge of the community, Neckoway tells the story, secondhand, of how her family members used to come down the bank to fetch water.Now, she says, her mother, aunties and uncles spend as much time as possible at their family’s camp on the other side of the lake.She’s getting ready to take the Wa Ni Ska Tan crowd there.But before she does, she humbly but honestly shares one reservation she’s having.“I don’t want us to be victimized,” she says somewhat hesitantly, referring to the way media often portrays Indigenous peoples and how those representations are often then internalized.“It doesn’t do us any good if we’re in the [victim] mindset. We need to empower ourselves. And we need people to respect fundamentally that relationship and those views that the elders have about the land and the environment.“There’s a reason why people are so upset here.”Moments later we board a small boat and head across Footprint Lake to the camp.A small log cabin sits about 150 feet in the woods back from the shore. Out front a large wooden deck where three of Necokway’s aunts and two uncles sit chatting with one another and drinking tea.They’ve prepared a meal of fresh whitefish, pickerel and jackfish, fried bannock and coleslaw.Edward Linklater tells APTN a story similar to the ones we’ve heard in other hydro-impacted communities: The water used to be clean, drinkable; the lakes were safe and navigable; the fishing and hunting were bountiful; the people were happier than they are now.But now, he explains, going out on the water is risky, and fishing isn’t feasible for most.The separation of the people from their land and waters has brought grave consequences.“We are losing our language,” Linklater says. Youth have access to Cree language programs in the school, but it’s not the same as land-based learning, he explains.“Even if they speak it, I can’t understand them.”(Elder Edward Linklater, Ramona Neckoway’s uncle, says the separation of his people from the land and water due to hydro development has contributed to his people’s loss of their language. Photo: Justin Brake)Linklater also recalls deaths in the community he attributes to changes in the waters due to hydro.A boat two of his friends were in, both of them fishermen, capsized years ago.“The current was so strong, the boat couldn’t handle it,” he says.“Other people were swept away and their bodies were never found.”Neckoway’s aunt Nina says she wants people in Southern Manitoba and Minnesota, who create demand for and consume the energy Manitoba Hydro generates in the north, to know the true cost of power.She says there was a time when “money didn’t matter” to her people. “Everything we ate came from the land.“But now all the animals are getting sick from the pollution,” she adds, explaining they don’t even eat fish from their own lake due to concerns of mercury. Now they have to travel out of the community to get their fish.Neckoway says hydro development forced her people out of their traditional economy and into one that has had too negative an impact of their well-being.“Maybe capitalism, so to speak, is part of the problem,” she says.While they appreciate the “modern amenities” and want opportunities, she says, “I kind of don’t feel that it should come at the expense of the environment.”Desecration of a sacred siteNeckoway’s family take the Wa Ni Ska Tan members across Footprint Lake to the place where the lake got its name, and also to illustrate how Manitoba Hydro and the province regard the Cree in their pursuit of energy and profits.We arrive at a cliff on the north shore of the lake, not far from the community.As the boat approaches the cliff two circles embedded in the rock come into sight. Inside each circle is what appears to be shape of a footprint.Nisachawayasihk Elder Donald Hart tells the story of Wisahkecahk and how the Cree cultural hero came to leave his footprints on the side of the rock cliff that once rested above the water. But when Manitoba Hydro informed the Nisichawayasi Nehethowuk that the water levels in their lake would rise drastically, there was little regard for the footprints despite concern from elders in the community.In 1976, with the inundation of Footprint Lake, Wisahkecahk’s footprints were underwater.Elders continued in their distress over the desecration of the sacred site, and in 1977 the footprints were cut from the submerged rock face and transported to a museum in Winnipeg. The following year they made their way back to the community, where they were put on public display.It would be a few more years before elders and the community, still unsettled by the flooding and subsequent removal of the footprints, would have the footprints returned to their place on the side of Footprint Lake.“They wanted them back, the people,” Hart explains, “because they figured it might be cursed over there [in the community], you know.”The large piece of rock once cut from beneath the water now sits atop the cliff. And Wisahkecahk’s footprints have been removed from that rock and embedded back into the rock face 10 or 20 feet above their original location, above water.(The footprints of Wisahkecahk were flooded by Manitoba Hydro in the 1970s, then removed from their original location and put in a museum before being re-embedded into a new piece of rock. Peter Kulchyski says the desecration of the sacred site shows a blatant disregard for the Cree’s religious rights. Photo: Justin Brake)In the woods about 50 feet beyond the cliff is the frame of a sweat lodge.Hart says people from his community return to the site for prayer and ceremony.Peter Kulchyski, the professor of Native Studies from University of Manitoba who helped launch Wa Ni Ska Tan and the visits to hydro-impacted communities, likens Manitoba Hydro’s flooding and desecration of the footprints to the demolition of the Sistine Chapel.“They took one of the most sacred sites in the province and they ripped it out and travelled it around, and eventually sent it back to the site, though much higher up than they were,” he later tells APTN by phone.“I think that shows a brutal disregard for the cultural heritage of the Nehethowuk people. We pay lip service to freedom of religion, but actually Aboriginal spirituality apparently doesn’t count when it comes to freedom of religion and we will affect religious sites for money, and have done so.”New relationships, same resultsManitoba Hydro says it has changed its ways since the days of forcing Indigenous people from their homes and flooding their ancestral lands.While they declined an interview for this series, Hydro spokesperson Bruce Owen told APTN by email that “much has changed in Manitoba and Canada from [that] time period.“More stringent environmental regulations and licensing requirements are in place today than 50-60 years ago…[which] ensure that all our projects minimize their impact on the natural environment and the people who live there.”The Wuskwatim and Keeyask dams, Owen says, were “developed in partnership with local communities, who have the opportunity to participate in the planning of the projects and to have an equity stake in these projects should they so choose.”But Kobliski says that as a result of Nisichawayasihk’s partnership on Wuskwatim, a 200-megawatt $1.3 billion dam built near Nelson House, her community is facing tens of millions of dollars of debt—to Manitoba Hydro, nevertheless—and no guarantee of a return on their investment.In 2006, after almost a decade of negotiations, Nisichawayasihk signed the Wuskwatim Project Development Agreement (WPDA) with Manitoba Hydro, which gives the First Nation a 33 per cent partnership on the 200-megawatt dam.The cost to NCN was $28 million plus a $56 million loan from Manitoba Hydro itself, to be paid back out of anticipated future profits.But project cost overruns, the U.S. financial crash of 2008 and a decreased demand for export energy have pushed any possibility of windfall profits for NCN into the future.The deal between NCN and Hydro has since been amended twice to protect the community from bearing the immediate financial burden of paying more due to the unforeseen circumstances.But Kulchyski says NCN is “sinking deeper into debt,” and that the restructuring of the agreements were done without community votes.“They’ve just been done between utility and the band council,” he says.Kobliski says the people in her community have not given their free, prior and informed consent to the agreement because “there wasn’t any proper consultation” with the restructuring.She says she’s been seeking answers from Chief Marcel Moody and council, but to no avail.APTN reached out to Chief Moody for comment but did not receive a response by the time of publication.“No matter what we ask around here it falls on deaf ears,” Kobliski says. “We never get a response back. And it’s been like this for many, many years.”Kobliski also says that not only have living conditions in her community not improved since the band struck the deal with Hydro — they’ve gotten worse.That includes taking into account the $56 million implementation agreement Hydro settled with NCN in 1996 to compensate for the harm caused by the Churchill River Diversion in the late ‘70s.“Ever since 1996, since the money came into our community…we’ve been having a lot of social problems in our community,” she explains.“It was escalating to the point where gang members were coming in here selling drugs. We’ve had a lot of violence in our community, a lot of domestic violence, suicide, sexual assault,” she continues, adding that “for the past 10 years it’s been really bad.”Kobliski is a First Nation safety officer for the band. She’s one of 16 officers who work with the RCMP officers in the community of 2,500, she says.She insists that as someone who checks vehicles coming into the community to enforce alcohol limits she has special insight into how her people are doing in the wake of NCN’s deals with Manitoba Hydro.“I grew up in a community where there was not much alcohol…and now there’s cocaine, there’s crystal meth, there’s marijuana, there’s ecstasy — there’s so much,” she says.“And the violence that we’re seeing in the community, it was so rapid. It’s almost like there’s a crisis going on here. The way I see it, where the money goes, the drug dealers are going to follow the money.Kobliski says trust money from NCN and Hydro’s 1996 implementation agreement has funded important programs in the community and helped build infrastructure.In 2015 Chief Moody told the Winnipeg Free Press, in an interview about restructuring the Wuskwatim deal, that the band is in fact dependent on its deal with Manitoba Hydro to compensate for lack of federal support.“We have no funding at all from the federal government to deal with housing and infrastructure,” he said, explaining his “philosophy has always been that if the government isn’t going to help us we’re going to have to do it ourselves.”But Kobliski points to the community’s drug and alcohol treatment centre—and now a women’s crisis centre currently under construction—as further indicators the prosperity promised by hydro development has not come.She says there have been issues with drinking water in the community, and that some have fallen ill.Some, like herself, don’t drink the water because they don’t trust it.She recalls a childhood memory of elders gathered in her grandfather’s home.“I remember him saying to the elders there that one day we will be buying water in water bottles. I used to wonder what he was talking about, and now I see it.”Kobliski travels 75 kilometres to Thompson every week or two to buy bottled drinking water, something not many community members can afford to do, she says.“The only time we use water that’s coming from Nelson House is to shower with, and to wash our clothes, and to clear our house.”She says her people “were fine the way we were” prior to hydro development in the region.“Everybody helped one another. Nobody had to lock their doors. We didn’t have to worry about our children. And now it’s like everybody’s fighting to survive here. Nobody’s looking out for anybody anymore. There’s so much fear. We’re living in fear of one another,” she continues, laying part of the blame on the band’s leadership.“It’s sad because the way our leaders made it sound when this project was coming through: we’re going to have this, we’re gonna have that, we’re gonna prosper. Well why are our people still living in poverty? Why are our homes still full of mould?”Kobliski also warns that Manitoba Hydro’s messaging about corporate responsibility and First Nation partnerships is deceptive.“It looks good on the outside — they’re painting a good picture of the partnership, but inside the communities we’re all suffering,” she says.“This is our territory”Back on her auntie’s dock in Nelson House Neckoway is clear that her people don’t need sympathy, “because we can confront and contest what’s going on in a dignified way.”But first that requires a public discussion and understanding of the true nature of hydro development in her territory.“My aunt used to tell me stories of my grandfather chasing away surveyors and people at Wuskwatim [Lake] in the ‘50s,” she says.“So my mom grew up as they worked there. And then I was born into the Northern Flood Agreement, my daughter was born into the implementation agreement, and then my grandson inherited the [Wuskwatim] agreement.”(Ramona Neckoway says Nisichaswayasihk Cree Nation’s agreements with Manitoba Hydro over the past 40 years “just keep getting worse and worse despite the narrative that this is an opportunity to be self-determining and self-governing.” Photo: Justin Brake.)“So those four generations, each of them has had their own experience,” she continues. “But three of four of them have inherited—been born into—these realities where each generation has their own agreement.But the agreements “just keep getting worse and worse despite the narrative that this is an opportunity to be self-determining and self-governing. I don’t buy that rhetoric, and I continue to be so opposed to this model that was used up here.“This is our reality, and the fact that you’ve got 40 years worth of agreements, 40 years worth of promises, and we’re not getting any better…now I think we can actually talk about the social consequences of what’s going on,” Neckoway continues.“And to me that’s tied to the loss of land, and the dispossession of culture, of land, of territory, of connections, kinship.”Neckoway points up to the houses on the reservation.“There’s a colonial context behind that,” she says. “This was where people came for church and school, [but] they lived in camps.“People have bought into this idea that this Indian reserve is our boundary — but out boundary is out there,” she continues, pointing across the green waters of Footprint Lake at the hills beyond.“This is our territory. The history’s out there. I can feel my ancestors out here, I can feel that connection.”jbrake@aptn.ca@justinbrakenewsabrandson@aptn.ca@ashleybrandsonlast_img read more

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Some reaction to the NDPs decision to proceed with the Site C

first_imgHere is some of the reaction to the NDP government’s decision to go ahead with the Site C hydroelectric dam in British Columbia:“Today is a dark day. The government has passed up its chance to stop this misbegotten project. Instead, it has betrayed First Nations and all those who voted in hope of stopping Site C.” — Peace Valley campaigner Galen Armstrong of the Sierra Club in B.C.___“In the long-run, Site C’s affordable energy is a huge competitive advantage for business in the province. B.C.’s hydroelectric system gives businesses and residents certainty that reliable and clean power will be available when it is needed.” — Val Litwin, president and CEO of the B.C. Chamber of Commerce.___“Affirming the construction of Site C is the right decision for the future of our province. Assuring a domestic source of clean, reliable hydroelectric power helps secure our energy system for the growth of businesses and sectors of the Lower Mainland and provincial economy for decades into the future.” — Iain Black, president and CEO of the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade.___“Since the 1970s when it was first proposed, the Site C dam has caused nothing but worry and heartbreak for the farm families and First Nations living in the Peace River Valley. With the election of the NDP government, there came reason to hope. But now the looming threat of a dam flooding them out is back – what a lost opportunity.” — National campaign director Joe Foy of the Wilderness Committee.___“With so much at stake for our province, better late than never for John Horgan and the NDP government to support Site C. This entire process and all of the uncertainty it caused was completely unnecessary. In the past four months, we have seen a rushed review and needless NDP-Green politicking create uncertainty and confusion that put this clean energy project, and the thousands of jobs it supports, at risk for no reason.” — Chris Gardner, president of the Independent Contractors and Businesses Association.___“It was John Horgan’s NDP that demanded a Site C inquiry by the B.C. Utilities Commission, and the results they received from it were clear: no need for the power, better alternatives once we do, and no advantage to ratepayers to proceed. With those findings, the only responsible choice was to immediately stop destroying the Peace River Valley. — Chief Roland Willson of the West Moberly First Nations.___“We recognize this has been a difficult decision for the newly elected NDP government. We respect and appreciate the many contributions from all sides of this issue because this was certainly not an easy choice. That said, completing the Site C dam remains the best choice for British Columbian families.” — Tom Sigurdson, executive director of the B.C. Building Trades.___“I am confident that First Nations will continue their efforts to stop Site C and the next step will be legal challenges. We have rights in our traditional territories and, just as important, we have responsibilities to those traditional territories — to protect them, maintain them and sustain them. If this project proceeds it will devastate traditional territories and sacred sites.” — National Chief Perry Bellegarde of the Assembly of First Nations.____“Taking a four billion-dollar bath with nothing to show for it would have been fiscally irresponsible.” — Kris Sims, B.C. director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.____“The Province has already broken its treaty promises to us, and that’s why we are going to trial in March.”“Premier Horgan could have done the right thing here and taken a step toward reconciliation, but he chose not to. Site C will be the single largest infringement of our rights under Treaty 8, and there is no justification for it.” — Blueberry River Chief Marvin Yahey.last_img read more

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Akinjo Hoyas hold off Campbells redhot Clemons 9385

first_imgWASHINGTON — James Akinjo made four straight free throws in the last 12 seconds to cool off a suddenly red-hot Campbell team and preserve Georgetown’s 93-85 win on Saturday.Georgetown (5-1) led all the way but saw a 22-point lead nearly evaporate in the final six minutes of the game. Campbell’s prolific Chris Clemons — the nation’s top scorer — went off for 45 points, tying his season high, 27 coming in the second half when he hit five of his nine 3-pointers and the Fighting Camels (3-3) came as close as six, 89-83, with 12 seconds left.Akinjo was fouled twice in the final seconds and made all four, finishing with 17 points and a perfect 6-for-6 at the foul line. Trey Mourning led with 27 points, 12 rebounds — both career highs —and three assists.Mourning’s father, Hoya and NBA great Alonzo Mourning was in the stands.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Vying for New Delhi’s eye

first_imgBoth the seats in the Barak valley of Assam-Silchar and Karimganj go to polls today in the second phase for which campaigning was in full swing. While there are 14 candidates in the fray in Silchar, there are 19 contesting in Karimganj. However, the main fight in Silchar is between BJP and Congress; and Karimganj is seeing a 3 cornered fight among BJP, Congress, and AIUDF. Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the star campaigner for BJP, and Rahul Gandhi have already visited the valley and addressed rallies. Other leaders have also flown in and out for both the major candidates including the rallies of Himanta Biswa Sarma and Priyanka Gandhi. Also Read – A special kind of bondClearly, the elections this time are at a very crucial juncture and many of the issues affecting the region have a direct bearing on the elections. Needless to say, political parties would also need to address these issues and so far the campaign has shown that the priorities are not necessarily similar. What is very pertinent to note is that Barak valley always needs a strong voice in Delhi to be able to project its issues beyond what would come from Guwahati as an issue of Assam as a priority. Also, for more than a decade, the age-old practice of having a Rajya Sabha MP from the region has not been carried forward by Congress and so the responsibility on both Lok Sabha MPs to be visible in the national capital is very high. Also Read – Insider threat managementThat brings us to the issues at hand and how they are so crucial for the future of the valley. Both on the political and economic front, there are many points that are best raised during this election season as during intervening periods but a certain degree of indifference is seen among the political fraternity. The most important point that touches many people in the valley is the issue of National Registrar Certification (NRC) that is still underway under the guidance of the Supreme Court of India and also a somewhat related impact of the Citizenship Amendment Bill (CAB) that BJP had already passed in the Lok Sabha and has mentioned in its election manifesto. In the NRC process, many genuine Indians have faced a lot of trouble at the various stages of its preparations and the process remains incomplete. While both PM Modi and Rahul Gandhi have assured that no Indian will be out of the list, political workers on the ground have not been found to be vociferous in demanding common man’s comfort and ensuring no harassment. While BJP has proposed and supported CAB, Congress has opposed it. The issue remains that even if CAB is passed by Parliament, the next steps of the application for citizenship after a mandatory wait of six years will have to be smoothly managed and supported by the political and bureaucratic system. The issue of people languishing in detention camps for years is a very sensitive one. Both leaders skipped the issue this time although Narendra Modi had assured during his election campaign in 2014 while speaking at Silchar to stop the detention camps. There are 108 inmates in the detention camp in Silchar which is in a very bad state and local BJP leaders should have made the efforts with state government and Centre to remind them of the prime minister’s promise and free the detained inmates from those camps which are more worse than prisons. The case of 103-year-old Chandradhar Das in Silchar camp and the recent death of Amrit Das in the Goalpara detention camp have shaken the whole of humanity but there is no action on the ground. The only hope is the Supreme Court which has asked the Central and state governments to provide ways and means in which people in detention camps could be allowed to leave. Interestingly, neither the Congress president nor anybody else has uttered a word about these camps and their hapless inmates. However, the most important focus for the Barak valley has to be on the economic front. Both the major political parties have to make this an important point of their campaign as the potential of this region has remained unutilised in all these 70 plus years of Independence. On the other hand, many industries have closed down and condition of the once prosperous tea industry in the region is in shambles. While Rahul Gandhi has mentioned in his Panchgram rally to get the Cachar Paper Mills of Hindustan Paper Corporation in Panchgram to be running in six months time, it seems to be more of a poll promise as he would be unaware of the situation that this once profit-making mill has been led to by many in his own party with the help of vested interests. Narendra Modi kept silent on the whole issue in both his speeches this year at Ramnagar, but his government worked on a model and due diligence for the revival of the mill. However, it is crucial that the employees are paid their salary which is pending for more than two years. The recent move from the National Company Law Tribunal (NCLT) hearing has generated some interest in the issue but it is crucial to take a political call on the matter and have the mill running. After all, it is the only heavy industry in the region and prospects of the paper industry are still very strong. At the same time, people who have led the mill to such a situation with corrupt practices should be punished at earliest. Barak’s special economic focus has to be strengthened with more infrastructure, skill development, and entrepreneurship. A mission-mode approach developing agriculture and its ancillaries will be crucial in raising the region from its current stagnated situation. The focus to project Assam as an investor-friendly state and a major player in Act East policy of the Union government is being supported by the state government and the Advantage Assam summit in February 2018 while supportive events of Namami Brahmaputra and Namami Barak held in the run-up to that summit in 2017 have shown an intent of BJP dispensation to look at Barak specially. But actual investments on the ground has not been significant and this should be a focus of both the camps to be able to project to New Delhi in order to take advantage of the unique geographical location of Barak valley and allow trading and other avenues with adjoining states and neighbouring countries. The three districts of Barak Valley are directly connected to four northeastern states while Bangladesh and Myanmar borders are very close. There is an interest among ASEAN countries to have more economic engagement with northeastern states and Act East policy will be an enabler in that direction. Likewise, the completion of the East-West corridor of the Mahasadak in the Silchar Guwahati sector is crucial and all the bottlenecks at many of the quarters in the Cachar and Dima Hasao corridors have to be done at a fast pace with the roads fully operational. This will lead to wider economic activities in the region. The prime minister mentioned about the corridor in his speech at Ramnagar but for the last 5 years, the Haflong-Silchar corridor of just about 110 kilometres is yet to be completed. The potential of the inland waterways from the region despite being picked up has still not progressed and will be a gamechanger in trade and commerce once implemented. Prospects of the tourism corridor immediately take off when this road sector is up and functioning. So these elections offer the best possibility for the people of the Barak valley to put the right pressure in gaining the attention of the major political parties for taking care of valley’s interests seriously. The people have to be conscious while voting to see that they choose those candidates who will be able to raise their voices sincerely in Delhi, and deliver, not hide behind political statements and assurances. Enough of that has happened. Over the years the pulling capacity of politicians from Barak valley both in Guwahati and Delhi has dwindled and many of the representatives have not been able to make a mark even on burning issues that affect the people and region. Unless this responsibility is assigned on the elected legislators and parliamentarians it will be a downward slide on many fronts. Hopefully Lok Sabha elections this time will be the turning point for Barak valley politicians to be able to live up to people’s expectations. (Subimal Bhattacharjee is Director of Jookto which works in grassroots in northeast India and a former country head of General Dynamics. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

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Could 2013 be the start of something good for Canadas economy

OTTAWA — Almost four years removed from the start of the so-called economic recovery, 2013 could be the year Canada finally leaves the legacy of the Great Recession behind.It may not look like it from the numbers.[np_storybar title=”Full speed ahead for Canadian economy in 2013: RBC” link=”https://business.financialpost.com/2012/12/13/full-speed-ahead-for-canadian-economy-in-2013-rbc/”%5D Canada’s largest private sector bank is taking a relatively bullish stance on the prospects for the economy going forward.The Royal Bank’s latest quarterly outlook predicts growth will accelerate to 2.4% next year and continue to expand to 2.8% in 2014, following a year that saw the weakest growth since the recession and a virtual stall in the third quarter. Read full story here. [/np_storybar]With few exceptions, most economists see the upcoming year as not much better than what happened in 2012, when the pillars of global expansion came tumbling down like so many dominoes.Says Arlene Kish of IRS Global Insight: “It is more like the Canadian economy will be able to keep its head up by treading water while waiting out external global winds.”And CIBC chief economist Avery Shenfeld, who was recently voted the most accurate forecaster of the past two years, says the time for Canada to set sail from a few years of dead calm is 2014’s story.Canadians should hope Shenfeld doesn’t win the accuracy award next year because he is predicting the country’s gross domestic product output will only expand by 1.7%, marking the third consecutive year of losing altitude in the growth statistics since 2010.That’s the year the economy shot out of Great Recession with a 3.2% spurt. Since then, the numbers have trended downward — 2.6 in 2011, about 2.0 in 2012, and according to the latest consensus, 1.8 in 2013.So where’s the good news in all this?It’s that even the pessimists among the private sector forecasters say the second half of 2013 will start resembling the economy Canadians have been expecting for several years.For the optimists, solid growth and job creation arrive even earlier.“I think it’s certainly possible,” says Doug Porter, who was recently named the Bank of Montreal’s new chief economist — if Canada and the world manage to skirt the potholes.The first crater is just around the corner. The U.S. Congress and White House have to work out a fiscal deal that prevents government action from sabotaging the economy. Pothole number two is Europe, which will remain a major risk for years.“Ultimately to really get rolling we need a much healthier U.S. economy and I do think things are starting to fall in place for the U.S.,” Porter says.“Their housing sector is turning the corner, auto sales are getting back to almost normal … and if that happens, then that would be a huge positive for the Canadian economy.”The Royal Bank, among the glass half-full crowd, sees policy-makers steering clear of cliffs, fiscal and otherwise, with the result being a stronger global performance. And it sees the resultant boost drawing early dividends.The RBC has Canada’s economy picking up steam in each of the first three quarters of 2013, starting with a 2.4% gain in the first quarter and peaking at 3.4% in the third, the summer months. Overall, 2013 will average 2.4%, mostly because of the weak handoff, and 2014 expands to 2.8%.RBC chief economist Craig Wright doesn’t see this as particularly strong growth, given that typically recoveries can generate rates as high as five and six per cent. But in comparison to the last few years, it constitutes solid progress.The reason it won’t be more robust, says Wright, is that while exports provide a boost as the global economy strengthens, the domestic side goes into hibernation for awhile.Canadian households have spent their limit the past few years, he explains, so their contribution is likely to cool going forward, led by a much more tame housing sector.TD Bank chief economist Craig Alexander also sees the U.S. fiscal cliff negotiations as key. If there is a deal between the Democrats and Republicans, about four percentage points of stimulus — in terms of spending and tax cuts — will stay on the books another year.But the importance of a political deal goes beyond the direct aid to business and workers, he says.Some have argued only fear and lack of confidence has kept trillions of dollars in U.S. corporate treasuries — what Bank of Canada governor Mark Carney called “dead money” — from being unleashed, triggering a new growth cycle.“If you had a bipartisan deal you could have remarkably strong economic growth in the United States because you would unlock business confidence, which could allow very strong balance sheets to be put to work, creating jobs and economic growth,” he explained.On the other hand, if it went the other way, even the most pessimistic of forecasters would be embarrassed by how rosy his outlook had been.Economists say an example of what could be in store is to consider the stock market crash that occurred in the summer of 2011 when Republicans threatened to hold up extending the U.S. debt limit. Next year’s “fiscal cliff” repercussions would be scarier and longer lasting, they say.It’s one reason Finance Minister Jim Flaherty says he’s “relatively optimistic” it won’t happen. “I think there’s a keen realization of the seriousness of the issue.”Early on, as Canada was emerging from the slump, economists warned this recovery would be different, leading the CIBC’s Shenfeld to label it “the Great Disappointment.”Their reasoning was that the 2008-09 crisis wasn’t caused by fatigue or central banks hiking interest rates to control inflation. So cutting rates wouldn’t work, or wouldn’t work dramatically.At the centre of the crisis was years of excessive spending, particularly on borrowed money, which only years of saving could reverse.That wasn’t so much the case in Canada, but as a trading nation, Canada paid the price when its foreign customers stopped buying what it was selling. They’re still not buying. Exports have actually contracted in the past year and overall, are still below where they were in 2007.But economists say winds are changing on that front, particularly south of the border, where households have reduced debt and built up their net worth to near pre-slump levels. As well, China, which went through a particularly soft patch this year, is expected to put in a more solid performance in 2013.Barring another major setback, those two sources of external strength will help lift Canada’s economy. The question is will it be this year?The Canadian Press read more

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Goodbye fluorescent bulb Dutch company Philips says LED lamp will soon light

Goodbye fluorescent bulb? Dutch company Philips says LED lamp will soon light up your office by Toby Sterling, The Associated Press Posted Apr 11, 2013 3:46 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email AMSTERDAM – If you’ve worked in an office, you’re probably familiar with the soft glow of fluorescent tubes drifting from the ceiling. If Europe’s Philips brand is right, those lamps could soon be history.Royal Philips NV, the Dutch consumer appliances giant, said Thursday that it has developed an LED light that will soon be far more efficient than the best fluorescents on the market. That should make it cheaper and greener, as well.It’s a combination that will inevitably help the LED dominate the market for illuminating the world’s workplaces, according to the global leader in lighting sales.In an interview with The Associated Press ahead of the unveiling of the new light, a top executive said the prototype LED is headed to mass production and will hit the market in 2015. He claimed that in 10 years, LEDs will replace at least half of the world’s fluorescent bulbs, which have been the main source of workplace lighting since shortly after World War II.“This is a major step forward for the lighting world,” said Rene van Schooten, CEO of Philips’ light sources division. “It will bring an enormous savings in energy.”Experts outside the Dutch company say they have long expected LEDs to eclipse fluorescents. If Philips’ predictions are correct, however, the arrival of the LED in office spaces will come faster than expected.The potential impact in energy and cost savings, as well as pollution reduction, is significant — though toxic materials are used in manufacturing both fluorescents and LEDs.Lights suck up more than 15 per cent of all energy produced globally, and fluorescent lights currently make up more than half of the total lighting market.In the United States alone, fluorescents consume about 200 terawatts annually, according to Philips’ estimates. Cutting that in half would save $12 billion in electricity costs and lessen carbon dioxide emissions by 60 million metric tons per year, the company said.Dr. Eugenia Ellis, a professor of engineering and architecture at Drexel University, who works with LED installations, said an efficiency improvement at the level Philips forecasts would be impressive. Cost savings from using LEDs can already be significant: Ellis gave the example of a hospital recently saving $75,000 a year on energy bills by switching.In recent years, energy-efficient lights made by Philips, Siemens AG, General Electric Co., Cree Inc. and others using LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, have made significant inroads in the home market, replacing many incandescent and halogen bulbs.But because fluorescent bulbs are themselves highly efficient, LED lights have so far achieved only a small foothold in business and industry. LEDs are competitive in heavy use settings where their longer lifespans and a minor energy edge pay off.Philips says its new lamp will change all of that. The technical milestone the company claims to have achieved is the ability to produce 200 lumens of light per watt. A lumen is the standard measure of the amount of light a lamp casts in a given area.According to Mark Hand, a technology expert at Philips competitor Acuity Brands Inc., that’s about twice the output per watt of the best fluorescent tubes currently on the market; he estimated the best LED lamps may get up to 120 lumens per watt.Cree already advertises an LED lamp it says reaches 200 lumens per watt under some circumstances. Van Schooten said the Philips lamp is different. It will be the first on the market that reaches that level of efficiency and functions across a normal range of temperatures and is capable of consistently producing the same amount of warm white colored light as comparable fluorescent tubes.Essentially, Van Schooten said, “if you walk into the room, you don’t say, ‘what a funny lamp.’”U.S. Department of Energy projections published in April 2012 showed the government had expected the industry would only achieve efficiencies of 160 lumens per watt for LED lamps by 2015.Philips’ Van Schooten said that initially, prices of its LED tubes will still be higher than fluorescent lights. But taking into account electricity costs, the increased efficiency in 2015 will make them cheaper to own within a year, as opposed to three years at present.And further manufacturing savings and efficiency improvements to LED lights will come with each generation of technology.“The case is rather compelling, but of course it takes some time to replace existing infrastructure,” Van Schooten said.Philips lighting sales in 2012 amounted to 8.4 billion euros ($11 billion) in a total global market that consulting firm McKinsey puts at 70 billion euros.Acuity Brands’ Hand said that Philips’ 10-year view may even be pessimistic. Although LEDs currently make up only a small percentage of his company’s $1.9 billion in annual sales, he expects that to change quickly.“LEDs will take over, definitely within 10 years,” he said. He predicted that LEDs would make up more than 50 per cent of new sales “certainly within 5 years, maybe within three.”Ironically, Philips will both lose and gain from the change: It is not only the largest maker of LEDs, but also of fluorescent tubes.“Clearly we’ll have to phase that out,” Van Schooten said. But “we knew this moment was coming for some time.” read more

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Football Joshua Norwood transfers out of Ohio State

OSU Gray redshirt sophomore Joshua Norwood (28) breaks up a pass intended for OSU Scarlet senior wide receiver Austin Mack (11) during the Spring Game at Ohio Stadium on April 15th, 2017. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Social Media EditorOhio State redshirt sophomore cornerback Joshua Norwood is transferring from the football program, a team spokesman confirmed to The Lantern. Norwood’s departure was originally reported by Tim May of the Dispatch.Norwood is the eighth Buckeye to leave the program since the end of the 2016 season, joining transfers offensive linemen Evan Lisle, Tyler Gerald and Kyle Trout, and wide receivers James Clark, Torrance Gibson and Alex Stump. Quarterback Stephen Collier announced his retirement from football in January, as well.A member of the 2015 recruiting class, the Valdosta, Georgia, native redshirted his first season in Columbus, then played limited minutes in 11 games in 2016, accumulating eight tackles, one tackle for loss and one pass breakup.He has three years of eligibility remaining.Norwood’s transfer brings the Buckeyes down to the NCAA’s 85 scholarship limit for the 2017 season. read more

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Wrestling Ohio State volunteer coach Anthony Ralph finds talent in overlooked recruits

Anthony Ralph joined the Ohio State wrestling program as a volunteer assistant coach in October 2016. Credit: Courtesy of Ohio State AthleticsAnthony Ralph started in collegiate wrestling as a competitor at Kent State, but it wasn’t until he took a post-graduation job as an assistant coach at Notre Dame College that he realized the nuances of recruiting.“It was selling a school, getting the people to trust in you, building relationships that start through the recruiting process,” Ralph said. “If the student-athlete trusts you enough to come to a school that you believe in, it kind of builds that bond and friendship.” Now, as a volunteer assistant coach for the Ohio State wrestling team, Ralph has taken his love of recruiting and combined it with an analytical approach to find unheralded recruits who might bring success to the program. He calls his strategy “moneyball,” a reference to the analytics-driven success the Oakland Athletics had in 2002. “At Notre Dame, myself and a couple of the other coaches kind of came up with a system, an algorithm to find value in guys that other schools don’t see,” Ralph said. “It’s recruiting those guys that aren’t getting the everyday call from Penn State or Michigan, Iowa, Oklahoma State.”Ralph came to Notre Dame College in 2006 at the invitation of his former Kent State coach, Frank Ramano, who was creating the Falcons’ wrestling program. By 2012, Ralph had helped bring in No. 1 recruiting classes in the NAIA from 2012-16. During his time as an assistant coach, he helped lead the Falcons to three NAIA national titles as well as an NCAA Division II team championship in 2014, producing 18 national champions and 62 All-Americans. “Before I left, I think we were No. 1 in the country the last five years,” Ralph said. “So, something I kind of took pride on because I couldn’t compete anymore. That was kind of my way of competing, as far as with other programs.” Ohio State associate head wrestling coach J Jaggers noticed Ralph’s success and kept his childhood friend from northeast Ohio on his radar.By December 2016, the old friends were reunited in Columbus, using the same algorithm that brought him success with the Falcons. “What his system is designed to do is provide depth, find value in some kids that the [recruiting] rankings may not indicate at the time,” Jaggers said.Ralph said the secret of the algorithm is to focus on wrestlers who specialize in scoring. It spots kids who are taking the most risks on the mat, showing consistency in shot attempts and points scored. This helps find wrestlers who are assertive rather than passive, head coach Tom Ryan said.“There are a lot of guys that win at the high school level that are not points scorers, lots of state champions, lots of highly ranked guys that are not point scorers,” Ryan said. “When you look at one of the critical ingredients to success at the next level, it’s a desire to put yourself in scoring positions all the time, so a lack of fear.”Ryan said Ralph has already become a key part of the coaching staff, pointing to the amount of work he does to find guys who fit the culture of Ohio State wrestling. “The biggest thing in the biggest way is that he digs so much that he finds people that want to be here,” Ryan said. “We need depth and I would say that he has already, in his short time here, helped a lot with our depth.”Ralph said “moneyball” is more than just finding athletes to round out the wrestling roster. It is to continue to build what Ryan and the rest of the coaching staff has built at Ohio State. “Using that ‘moneyball’ system, we are not just looking for depth,” Ralph said. “We are looking for guys that can wrestle at the Big Ten level and become All-Americans and national champs.”Jaggers said he thinks Ralph could become the nation’s best recruiter. “When he put his mind to, ‘I’m trying to be the best recruiter in college wrestling,’ with his personality and his skill set, yeah it could easily happen,” Jaggers said. read more

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Man charged over car hijacked last week with two children inside

first_imgUpdated 8pmGARDAÍ ARRESTED A 41-year-old man today in connection with a carjacking last week.This evening, they said that the man will appear in court tomorrow morning charged in relation to the hijacking and robbery.Two children and their mother were inside the car that was hijacked last Friday afternoon in Terenure in Dublin.The man claimed to have a weapon, and forced the woman to drive to her home, retrieve bank cards, and withdraw cash.He then forced her to drive the car to Portobello at which point he left the car, gardaí say.No one was injured in the incident.Another hijackingA teenager appeared before the Dublin Children’s Court this morning charged in relation with a separate hijacking of a taxi in Terenure on Sunday.Last week, a heavily pregnant woman was injured in a carjacking near Mountjoy Square.- First published 12pmAdditional reporting Aoife BarryRead: 15-year-old in court as drivers warned about spate of carjackings >last_img read more

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First Greek university Chancellor

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Prominent Greek Australian businessman George Pappas will be installed as the new Chancellor of Victoria University Council on May 13 at a ceremony at Flemington Racecourse.Professor David de Kretser, Governor of Victoria, will preside over the ceremony in his role as University Visitor.Mr Pappas has wide ranging experience across the commercial, government and university sectors, and is Chairman of the Committee for Melbourne.He is also well known for his contributions to the wider community including his work with Monash University and Melbourne High School and as a director of the Western Bulldogs Football Club.He took up his new role on 1 January 2010 following the retirement of the Hon Justice Frank Vincent AO, QC who was VU Chancellor for more than eight years.Mr Pappas is the fourth Chancellor since VU’s inception in 1990.last_img read more

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More police for minors

first_imgDeputy Citizens’ Protection Minister Manolis Othonas on Sunday announced plans for a special Greek Police service dedicated to the protection of minors throughout Greece. In statements made in Rethymno, Crete he stressed that the state’s duty was to create an environment of safety for all citizens and especially vulnerable social groups such as children and underage individuals. Othonas said the new police team will operate on the basis of a specific plan that will cover all aspects of protecting minors and enforcement of laws designed to protect them. He said the decision was spurred by the sudden death of 16-year-old Stella Akoumianaki from alcohol consumption on Holy Saturday. “The protection of minors and the role of the State and police services must approach and touch on issues that concern illegal child labour, the verbal and physical abuse of minors and not just be third parties but also within the school environment or by the family itself,” the deputy minister said. At the same time, he noted that the issue of protecting minors was not just or even mainly a police matter but one that required strong social institutions within the family and at school. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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The stunning prehistoric art of the Pylos Agate

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram It was over two years ago when the internet was crashing over the then newly discovered grave of the ‘Griffin Warrior’ in Pylos, Greece. The discovery was made in May 2015 by a team of archaeologists at the University of Cincinnati who had been digging at Pylos for more than 25 years, led by Jack L. Davis and Sharon R. Stocker. At the time, archaeologists and journalists put their focus on “more prominent” items unearthed, the likes of gold coins, silverware, gemstones and beads, ivory combs and a sword among other weapons found next well-preserved remains of what is believed to have been a powerful Mycenaean warrior or priest buried around 1500 BC, www.laboratoryequipment.com reports.The tomb of the ‘Griffin Warrior’ has been rightfully dubbed Greece’s the most spectacular archaeological discovery of the last 50 years, however, recent news reveal the most important masterpiece of miniature art of that time in the region.Amongst the treasures and remains uncovered in 2015, excavators found a grime-encrusted, inch and a half long object which was put aside, assuming it was a bead. After a conservator removed the limestone, it revealed a seal stone used to stamp on clay or wax.The image engraved on the gemstone is carved in tremendous detail, depicting a warrior in battle with two other men, leaving experts wondering how and why the seal was engraved in such detail.For the size of the stone, a normal person would have needed a magnifying object to carve it in such impeccable manner. The Pylos Combat Agate when it was unearthed. Photo: Alexandros Zokos/University of Cincinnati“The detail is astonishing, especially given the size. Aesthetically, it’s a masterpiece of miniature art,” John Bennet, director of the British School’s archaeological institute in Athens wrote in the journal Hesperia.“The stunning combat scene on the seal stone, one of the greatest masterpieces of Aegean art, bears comparison with some of the drawings in the Michelangelo show now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art,” added Malcolm H. Wiener, an expert on Aegean prehistory and a trustee emeritus of the Met.Fritz Blakolmer, another expert on Aegean art at the University of Vienna, argues that “the seal must have been engraved by someone with a magnifying glass, even though none has been found”, and dismissed the possibility that people of that era had sharper eyesight than today. Meanwhile, battle scene is strongly evocative of those in Homer’s epics Iliad and Odyssey even though the Griffin Warrior was buried around 1450 BC, centuries apart from the first written version of Homer. “We’re not saying this is a representation from Homer,” Dr. Stocker told the New York Times of the depiction adding that “it would be fun to believe the hero is Achilles”. “Rather, the image is part of a cycle of stories familiar to both Mycenaeans and Minoans,” he concluded.last_img read more

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WWE and Hyundai Hope On Wheels partner to support National Childhood Cancer

first_img Now Playing Up Next Facebook Google+ WWE announced on their website Thursday they have formed a partnership with the non-profit organization Hyundai Hope On Wheels in support of National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.You can read the full press release below:FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif., and STAMFORD, Conn., – September 6, 2018 – To highlight its 20th anniversary, Hyundai Hope On Wheels® (HHOW), a 501c(3) non-profit organization, today announced a partnership with WWE in support of National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. This week’s Monday Night Raw® kicked off a month-long worth of activities as HHOW joins WWE in a four-city tour to offer children cancer fighters at HHOW partner pediatric institutions a “VIP & Super Fan Experience.” The exclusive fanfare package comes complete with special VIP seating, WWE backstage access, along with a private meet and greet with WWE Superstars and Hope on Wheels National Youth Ambassador, Carter Gates.In its 20th year, Hyundai Hope On Wheels continues to be a pillar in the fight against pediatric cancer. Every 36 minutes a child is diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. While nearly 80% of cancer in children can be cured, pediatric cancer remains the leading disease related cause of death for children. This September, HHOW will fund $14.1 million towards innovative pediatric cancer research with the mission to find a cure.“One child diagnosed with pediatric cancer is one child too many. Hyundai Hope On Wheels works diligently with pediatric institutions, oncology research doctors, and our community partners to support the brave children and families that are affected by this disease,” said Scott Fink, Board Chair, Hyundai Hope On Wheels. “We are proud to stand alongside WWE in our efforts in the fight to end childhood cancer together.”“WWE is proud to partner with Hyundai Hope On Wheels to shine a spotlight on National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month,” said Stephanie McMahon, WWE Chief Brand Officer. “Raising awareness to help find a cure for pediatric cancer is imperative, and we are determined to fight this debilitating disease alongside Hyundai.”Throughout the month, Hyundai Hope On Wheels messaging will be shared with fans across WWE’s global platforms, including TV broadcasts, WWE Network and digital and social media. In addition, activation will continue at Monday Night Raw on September 10 in New Orleans, September 17 in Dallas and September 24 in Denver.Everyone is invited to join the campaign and encouraged to visit the HHOW website (www.HyundaiHopeOnWheels.org) to view stories of brave cancer survivors and passionate doctor-researchers. Once there, supporters may add their handprint to a wall of hope to show their support for the cause. They will also find information on additional ways to support HHOW through social media efforts and events throughout the month.Additionally, WWE has its own pediatric cancer fund, Connor’s Cure. Connor’s Cure was created by Stephanie McMahon and Paul “Triple H™” Levesque to support pediatric brain and spinal cord cancer research. Connor’s Cure was established in honor of 8-year-old WWE fan Connor Michalek, a patient at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC who battled medulloblastoma, a rare tumor that affects the brain and spinal cord. In 2015, Connor’s Cure launched a national partnership with the V Foundation for Cancer Research, ensuring that 100 percent of all net funds raised directly benefits pediatric cancer research. To date, Connor’s Cure has raised more than $2.5 million and assisted more than 400 families around the world.For more information about Hyundai Hope On Wheels and to view a list of the 2018 Hope On Wheels grant winners, please visit www.hyundaihopeonwheels.org/research. You can also follow Hyundai Hope On Wheels on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram at facebook.com/HyundaiHopeOnWheels , twitter.com/HopeOnWheels or Instagram.com/HyundaiHopeOnWheels.Recommended videosPowered by AnyClipMUST HAVE – Neo Vintage Hot-RodVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPauseUnmuteDuration 2:28/Current Time 0:03Loaded: 23.77%0:03Remaining Time -2:25 FullscreenUp NextThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Replay the list Harley-Davidson Laying Off 40 Employees Fifty electric car charging stations coming to New York City Now Playing Up Next Twitter Live Podcast: Reviewing and discussing WWE Clash of Champions from Charlotte Wrestleview Live #65: Reviewing and discussing WWE Clash of Champions from Charlotte Now Playing Up Nextcenter_img Now Playing Up Next Jerome Wilen RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp MUST HAVE – Neo Vintage Hot-Rod Pinterest Young Cancer Survivor Gets ‘Bumblebee’ Birthday Surprise Now Playing Up Next NISSAN Social Drive: Athletes, Franchises Remember September 11 Attacks WWE Clash of Champions Results – 9/15/19 (Rollins vs. Strowman, Kingston vs. Orton)last_img read more

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Former Miami Dolphin hosts giveaway for returning students

first_imgAVENTURA, FLA. (WSVN) – – A former NFL player treated some South Florida students to a shopping spree.Former Miami Dolphins offensive tackle Vernon Carey gave 32 Miami-Dade public school students new shoes for the academic year.Other former Dolphins players also joined in on the fun at Dick’s Sporting Goods in Aventura.Carey said it’s a great way to give back to the community.“This is like a touch of love — giving back to the community, helping everybody,” said Carey. “It doesn’t matter your skin color or whatever your race. It’s just giving back to your community and love everybody.”“It’s nice, and I’m thankful for them to give us shoes because some people don’t have money and really helps them out,” said student Trinity Davis.Each student received a $170 gift card. Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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Martha Posts DoubleDigit Publishing Internet Revenue Gains

first_imgMSLO REVENUE20072006%CHNG Also today, the company announced an agreement with Chef Emeril Lagasse to acquire the non-restaurant assets related for $50 million in cash and stock. During a conference call, MSLO CEO Susan Lyne said that while there is no plan to launch an Emeril Lagasse magazine, synergies between Lagasse’s brand and Everyday Food could help take “to the next level.”Overall, MSLO saw a 17.4 percent increase in publishing revenue to $183.7 million in 2007-by far its biggest segment.The company’s Internet business grew to $19.2 million in 2007, up 21.6 percent over 2006. MSLO’s online advertising revenue increased 60 percent in the fourth quarter as page views to the company’s Web products grew 33 percent for the year. Advertising revenue is up 35 percent for the first quarter, the company said. Publishing$183.7M$156.6M17.40% Source: MSLO Internet$19.20 $15.80 21.60% TOTAL$327.90 $288.30 13.70% Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia announced its fourth quarter earnings this morning, posting double-digit increases in revenue for its publishing and Internet businesses in 2007.Net income per share was $0.20 for the full- year 2007, compared to a loss of $0.33 in 2006-a return to profitability for a brand that had been besieged by its namesake’s stock scandal and subsequent incarceration.Publishing revenues increased 15 percent to $49.4 million in the fourth quarter, led by strong advertising gains at Martha Stewart Living (12 percent in ad pages). Advertising in the first quarter of 2008 is up approximately five percent, the company said. Revenue is expected to be $40 million for the quarter. The company raised ratebases for Martha Stewart Living (2,000,000), Everyday Food (900,000) and Body + Soul at 550,000. (The company will not have any revenue from the defunct Blueprint, which accounted for $7 million in 2007.)The publishing division’s operating loss was $1.1 million for the fourth quarter of 2007, compared to an operating loss of $2.2 million in the same period in 2006, while the company’s adjusted EBITDA was $0.1 million in the fourth quarter of 2007, compared to a loss of $1.3 million in the fourth quarter of 2006. Merchandising$84.70 $69.50 21.90% Broadcasting$40.30 $46.50 -13.40%last_img read more

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Rohingya crisis most shocking humanitarian disaster

first_imgBoris JohnsonBritish foreign secretary Boris Johnson on Friday said the plight of the Rohingya people and the sufferings they have had to endure is one of the most shocking humanitarian disasters of their time, reports UNB.”This is a man-made tragedy that could be resolved with the right political will, tolerance and cooperation from all those involved,” he said in a statement.The British foreign secretary said he wants to see and hear for himself the terrible things these people have been through, and he will be talking to state counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi and other regional leaders about how they can work together to resolve this appalling crisis.Boris is now holding meeting with foreign minister AH Mahmood Ali at State Guest House Padma.The meeting began at 7:50pm on Friday.He began a four-day tour to Asia today, Friday, where he will visit Myanmar and Thailand after visiting Bangladesh.This is the first official visit by a foreign secretary in ten years.He met prime minister Sheikh Hasina before coming to Padma.British high commissioner in Dhaka Alison Blake is accompanying the British foreign secretary in the meeting.The foreign secretary will also visit a refugee camp on the Bangladesh-Burma border near Cox’s Bazar on Saturday.The foreign secretary will see first-hand the conditions of the Rohingya who have fled Burma to refugee camps in Bangladesh and discuss with the Burmese government the steps needed to enable them to return to their homes.In Burma he will hold talks with state counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi and visit northern Rakhine.The foreign secretary will travel on to Bangkok for talks with Thai prime minister Prayut Chan-o-cha and also meet the chair of the advisory board on the Rakhine Advisory Commission, Surakiart Sathirathai.last_img read more

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World IPv6 Day test runs 24 hours starting June 8

first_img Citation: World IPv6 Day test runs 24 hours starting June 8 (2011, January 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-01-ipv6-internet-protocol-billion-space.html IPv6 guide provides path to secure deployment of next-generation Internet protocol On June 8, 2011 major web companies such as Facebook, and Yahoo!, will allow IPv6 to run on their main websites for 24 hours. These websites along with Google have more than one billion combined visits each day. They are joining major content delivery networks Akamai and Limelight Networks along with the Internet Society, for the first global-scale 24 hour trial run of the new Internet Protocol, IPv6.Internet users will not have to do anything to prepare for this 24 hour global event. According to the Internet Society, the vast majority of users, about 99.5%, will be unaffected. There will be some cases where users may experience connectivity problems due to the fact that their home network device is not configured correctly.The major goal of World IPv6 Day is to identify the potential problems under controlled testing and address them in a timely manner. Organizations involved in this global event will be working alongside operating system manufacturers, networking vendors and ISPs to minimize the number of users affected.World IPv6 Day marks a critical day in Internet history that will pave the way for future growth and enabling more computers, networks and handheld devices to come online. Explore further IPv6 is a new version of the Internet Protocol that is designed to succeed the existing Internet Protocol version 4. More information: World IPv6 Day, IPv6 © 2010 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — Today’s Internet protocol, IPv4, is expected to run out of space this year. On World IPv6 Day the first steps will be taken to test a long-term solution that will address the 30 year old 32 bit addresses.last_img read more

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1156 and counting…

first_imgNo related posts. Heavy smoke billows up following an Israeli military strike in Gaza City on July 29, 2014. The Israeli offensive, which began on July 8 to end Hamas rocket attacks on the Jewish state, has killed more than 1,100 Palestinians – mostly civilians – according to the United Nations, while 56 lives have been lost on the Israeli side – all but three of them soldiers. Facebook Commentslast_img

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