USDA Announces Conservation Incentives for Working Grass, Range and Pasture Lands

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News USDA Announces Conservation Incentives for Working Grass, Range and Pasture Lands USDA Announces Conservation Incentives for Working Grass, Range and Pasture Lands Facebook Twitter SHARE By Andy Eubank – Jul 16, 2015 Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced that beginning September 1, farmers and ranchers can apply for financial assistance to help conserve working grasslands, rangeland and pastureland while maintaining the areas as livestock grazing lands.The initiative is part of the voluntary Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), a federally funded program that for 30 years has assisted agricultural producers with the cost of restoring, enhancing and protecting certain grasses, shrubs and trees to improve water quality, prevent soil erosion and reduce loss of wildlife habitat. In return, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) provides participants with rental payments and cost-share assistance. CRP has helped farmers and ranchers prevent more than 8 billion tons of soil from eroding, reduce nitrogen and phosphorous runoff relative to cropland by 95 and 85 percent respectively, and even sequester 43 million tons of greenhouse gases annually, equal to taking 8 million cars off the road.“A record 400 million acres and 600,000 producers and landowners are currently enrolled in USDA’s conservation programs. The Conservation Reserve Program has been one of the most successful conservation programs in the history of the country, and we are pleased to begin these grasslands incentives as we celebrate the program’s 30th year,” said Vilsack. “This is another great example of how agricultural production can work hand in hand with efforts to improve the environment and increase wildlife habitat.”The CRP-Grasslands initiative will provide participants who establish long-term, resource-conserving covers with annual rental payments up to 75 percent of the grazing value of the land. Cost-share assistance also is available for up to 50 percent of the covers and other practices, such as cross fencing to support rotational grazing or improving pasture cover to benefit pollinators or other wildlife. Participants may still conduct common grazing practices, produce hay, mow, or harvest for seed production, conduct fire rehabilitation, and construct firebreaks and fences.With the publication of the CRP regulation today, the Farm Service Agency will accept applications on an ongoing basis beginning Sept. 1, 2015, with those applications scored against published ranking criteria, and approved based on the competiveness of the offer. The ranking period will occur at least once per year and be announced at least 30 days prior to its start. The end of the first ranking period will be Nov. 20, 2015.Later this week, USDA will also announce state-by-state allotments for the State Acres for Wildlife Enhancement (SAFE). Through SAFE, also a CRP initiative, up to 400,000 acres of additional agricultural land across 37 states will be eligible for wildlife habitat restoration funding. The additional acres are part of an earlier CRP wildlife habitat announcement made by Secretary Vilsack. Currently, more than 1 million acres, representing 98 projects, are enrolled in SAFE.To learn more about participating in CRP-Grasslands or SAFE, visit www.fsa.usda.gov/crp or consult with the local Farm Service Agency county office. To locate a nearby Farm Service Agency office, visit https://offices.usda.gov.The CRP-Grasslands program was made possible by the 2014 Farm Bill, which builds on historic economic gains in rural America over the past six years while achieving meaningful reform and billions of dollars in savings for the taxpayer. Since enactment, USDA has made significant progress to implement each provision of this critical legislation, including providing disaster relief to farmers and ranchers; strengthening risk management tools; expanding access to rural credit; funding critical research; establishing innovative public-private conservation partnerships; developing new markets for rural-made products; and investing in infrastructure, housing and community facilities to help improve quality of life in rural America. For more information, visit www.usda.gov/farmbill. Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleChina’s Ban on U.S. Poultry Could Open the Door for BrazilNext articleIndiana’s Don Villwock to Attempt Leap to AFBF Presidency Andy Eubanklast_img read more

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The Andersons Ethanol Group Doing Well

first_imgHome Energy The Andersons Ethanol Group Doing Well Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleClosing CommentsNext articlePurdue Ag Center to Host Field Day Gary Truitt By Gary Truitt – Aug 12, 2015 The Andersons Inc. reported solid results for the second quarter with net income of $31.1 million, or $1.09 per diluted shared. That compares with Q2 revenues last year of $1.2 billion. Last year’s Q2 net income was $44.3 million, or $1.56 per diluted share.Net income before taxes for the ethanol group was $9.7 million for Q2. That compares with $33.4 million in the same period last year for ethanol. “Ethanol went down,” CEO Mike Anderson noted in the investor call, “not because ethanol is bad, but because last year was so good.”“The ethanol group executed well operationally and achieved record second quarter ethanol production volumes,” the company said in its earnings release. “Strong results from the sale of coproducts were also seen.” The company expects ethanol demand to remain strong as lower gasoline prices continue to support gasoline demand. Routine fall maintenance shutdowns should help keep ethanol supply in balance, and export demand should support margins into the fall when domestic gasoline demand falls off.Margins improved in Q2 from near breakeven levels in the first quarter, investors were told during the call, rising to more robust levels in May before falling off through June as corn prices temporarily surged. “Margins are a bit weaker today but as we look to the second half we see signs for optimism in relatively low corn costs, continued good export and domestic demand and supply levels that should begin to soften as the industry goes through normal maintenance downtime in late August and September.” The Andersons Ethanol Group Doing Well Facebook Twitter SHARElast_img read more

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Syngenta and ChemChina Agree to $43 Billion Deal

first_img SHARE Syngenta and ChemChina Agree to $43 Billion Deal Previous articleUS Trade Officials Sign TPPNext articleThe State of the Indiana Dairy Industry Andy Eubank Home Indiana Agriculture News Syngenta and ChemChina Agree to $43 Billion Deal By Andy Eubank – Feb 3, 2016 Syngenta dealSyngenta has announced that ChemChina has offered to acquire the company in a $43 billion deal expected to conclude by the end of the year. Syngenta’s existing management will continue to run the company and when the deal is complete a ten member Board of Directors will be chaired by Ren Jianxin, Chairman of ChemChina, and will include four of the existing Syngenta Board members.“This offer fully values the quality of Syngenta, its business, our portfolio, our people and our market positions around the world,” said Davor Pisk, COO at Syngenta. “It underpins our current strategy and allows Syngenta to continue as a standalone company with very clear commitments to research and innovation to having a strong global presence.”Pisk says it is particularly pleasing that grower choice will be preserved “at a time when we’re seeing a lot of consolidation, and it’s important I think that we preserve the maximum amount of dollars that are allocated for researching for new innovations and that we continue to provide maximum amount of choice to growers to help them deliver on the need for increasing productivity within continually stretched natural resources.”ChemChina says they’ll keep a view on a potential IPO of the business in the years to come.About SyngentaSyngenta is a leading agriculture company helping to improve global food security by enabling millions of farmers to make better use of available resources. Through world class science and innovative crop solutions, our 28,000 people in over 90 countries are working to transform how crops are grown. We are committed to rescuing land from degradation, enhancing biodiversity and revitalizing rural communities. To learn more visit www.syngenta.com and www.goodgrowthplan.com.About ChemChinaChemChina, which is headquartered in Beijing, China, possesses production, R&D and marketing systems in 150 countries and regions. It is the largest chemical corporation in China, and occupies the 265th position among the Fortune 500. The company’s main businesses include materials science, life science, high-end manufacturing and basic chemicals, among others. Previously, ChemChina has successfully acquired 9 leading industrial companies in France, United Kingdom, Israel, Italy and Germany, etc. To learn more visit www.chemchina.com. Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter SHARElast_img read more

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Hoosier 4-H’ers Reach the Pinnacle at Grand Drive

first_img How Indiana Crops are Faring Versus Other States All quotes are delayed snapshots Home Indiana Agriculture News Hoosier 4-H’ers Reach the Pinnacle at Grand Drive Corn ZCN21 (JUL 21) 684.50 -14.50 Previous articleUncertainty Plagues Market in Advance of USDA Yield GuessesNext articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for August 8, 2017 Andy Eubank RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Minor Changes in June WASDE Report Live Cattle LEM21 (JUN 21) 118.70 1.13 Facebook Twitter 2017-Grand-DriveThe Indiana State Fair 4-H Grand Drive is where each year an unforgettable dream comes true for just a handful of 4-H youth. It’s a huge opportunity just to take to the floor of the Indiana Farmer’s Coliseum for a chance to win grand champion, and emotions go sky high when the winners are announced. Witness 19-year-old Melissa Rudolph of LaPorte County.“Really, I’ve never experienced anything like this,” she said. “This is my first time in the Grand Drive at the state fair, and wow, I’ve never experienced anything like that before.”Her dairy steer was name Grand Champion Sunday night. In Melissa’s case, the win comes after many years of hard work and the experience she picked up along the way.“There’s a lot of work that goes into this. We walk and wash steers every day, most of the time twice a day. There’s an intensive feeding program, and I’m a true believer if you start with a decent animal and you can feed it out to its full potential. So just learning how to feed over the years got me to this, and starting with a decent animal obviously.”The Grand Champion Market Barrow was shown by Cody Maxwell from Porter County and Morgan Township High School where he’ll be a junior. Being in 4-H and showing livestock have taught him good lessons for life.“Dedication, keep after hard work and good things will come,” he told HAT. “You know you lose a lot more times than you win, so you have to keep on fighting after you lose and one of these days you’ll get out there and win.”Those thoughts were echoed by another of the night’s winners, Lane Slaton, a Hamilton County high school sophomore.“It just teaches you a lot of perseverance. Not all of them are going to be like this one. You’ve got to keep trying to get to this point. It feels awesome!”Slaton had the Grand Champion Market Lamb. Other grand champions were Meat Goat Wether, Ethan Beaman, Cass County; Rabbit Meat Pen, Paige Gauck, Decatur County; Beef Steer, Remington Brumbaugh, Dekalb County. By Andy Eubank – Aug 8, 2017 Battle Resistance With the Soy Checkoff ‘Take Action’ Program Wheat ZWN21 (JUL 21) 680.75 -3.00 SHARE SHARE STAY CONNECTED5,545FansLike3,961FollowersFollow187SubscribersSubscribe Feeder Cattle GFQ21 (AUG 21) 151.18 2.78 Facebook Twitter Hoosier 4-H’ers Reach the Pinnacle at Grand Drive Lean Hogs HEM21 (JUN 21) 122.68 0.22 Name Sym Last Change Soybean ZSN21 (JUL 21) 1508.50 -35.50 last_img read more

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Bio-Based Products, The Key to Better Yields

first_img SHARE SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous articleBeef-Bacon Burger Hitting the Consumer MarketNext articleIndiana Grown Continues Growth Gary Truitt By Gary Truitt – Oct 4, 2017 Ian Klein, Spero Energy senior scientist, holds a vial of renewable, biobased chelates that could be used to increase crop production and yields. (Photo provided by Spero Energy)Today, most farmers use chemical-based crop protection products to improve plant health and yields, but the future may belong to products based on biology rather than chemistry. Spero Energy Inc. has received a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant for $100,000 to conduct research and development to increase the availability and competitiveness of biobased products within the agricultural market.Spero Energy developed a series of renewable, biobased chelates, which are molecules used to bind essential micronutrients and deliver them efficiently to a variety of crops. Effective use of biobased chelates is shown to increase crop production and yields. “A major limitation within the agricultural chelates market is the lack of high-performing and cost-competitive biodegradable chelates. The patent-pending chelates we have developed at Spero are created using natural materials, and are designed to be both high-performing and biodegradable,” said Ian Klein Ph.D., Spero Energy senior scientist. “This funding will allow us to finalize the formulation of our biodegradable chelates, increase the scale of the reactions, and further prepare for commercialization.”Spero Energy developed the technology in the Purdue Research Park of West Lafayette. Spero Energy has licensed other technologies through the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization. Spero Energy originated as a Purdue startup and the company incorporated in Indiana. Home Indiana Agriculture News Bio-Based Products, The Key to Better Yields Facebook Twitter Bio-Based Products, The Key to Better Yieldslast_img read more

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Donnelly: Senate Farm Bill Being Done in “Completely Bipartisan Way”

first_img Facebook Twitter Previous articleOpening Day for Hot Dog SeasonNext articleMorning Outlook Eric Pfeiffer SHARE By Eric Pfeiffer – Mar 29, 2018 Home Indiana Agriculture News Donnelly: Senate Farm Bill Being Done in “Completely Bipartisan Way” Donnelly: Senate Farm Bill Being Done in “Completely Bipartisan Way”As Hoosier Ag Today reported Wednesday, Kansas Republican and Senate Ag Chairman Pat Roberts said he believes a Farm Bill could reach the Senate floor by the end of April. Indiana Senator, and member of the Senate Ag Committee, Democrat Joe Donnelly believes that timeline is not unreasonable.“I would agree with Senator Roberts; he’s a good friend of mine. I have traveled around the state from one corner to the other holding farm bill listening sessions. As I told our Hoosier farmers, ‘you are writing this bill.’ They have been incredibly helpful to me in providing information. As a result, I think that the Farm Bill is on schedule. We are looking at continuing to move it along.”Donnelly says everything has been done in a “completely bipartisan way”; something that can’t be said for the House.“They seem to struggle in this occasionally. I think the Senate is ready and willing to go, and to do it on a bipartisan basis. And to do it in a way that both the nutrition portions of it and the ag portions of it can really blend together well.”Senator Donnelly addressed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, that is currently holding up talks in the House as House Democrats are reportedly opposing any changes to the existing program.“I think we’ll have a nutrition program that is also aimed at working together with our ag communities for all of our ag products to be included in the nutrition program. Additionally, it’ll be a nutrition program that is responsible, and then make sure that every dollar is spent wisely and prudently.Donnelly also said that rural broadband connectivity and addressing the opioid epidemic are priorities of his for the Farm Bill.“Broadband is critical to ag’s future and critical to our rural community’s future. And the ending this opioid scourge is not only critical for our communities, but for our families, for our children, and our loved ones as well.”As Farm Bill talks progress in the Senate, we’ll have to hurry up and wait to see if bipartisan ground can be found in the House. Facebook Twitter SHARE Donnelly: Senate Farm Bill Being Done in “Completely Bipartisan Way”last_img read more

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Study Abroad Fair helps students realize dreams

first_imgReddIt Twitter + posts Previous articleStudents learn about suicide prevention with Fresh Check DayNext articlePi Kapp Push Week ends with a song and dance Tobi Carter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Tobi Carterhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tobi-carter/ Tobi Carter Tobi Carterhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tobi-carter/ ReddIt Fort Worth resident dedicates life to rescuing dogs New literacy initiative rolled out in Fort Worth ISD The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years New bus route eases commute to Denton Facebook TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Tobi Carterhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tobi-carter/ Local artist and TCU alum presents new exhibit printExcitement filled the air as students realized their dream of studying abroad could become true.The Study Abroad Fair had 24 programs represented. They also gave away prizes and popcorn.On Oct. 7, the Center for International Studies held their annual fair to provide students with the knowledge they needed to help students study abroad.The fair had 24 programs represented, which included faculty-led and partner programs. The study abroad office offers more than 250 programs.Jesica Severson, the study abroad coordinator, said there are 22 faculty-led programs departing in summer 2016. Three of the programs leaving include Environmental Issues in Costa Rica, South African Biodiversity and Human Development and Exploring Film, TV and Sports in Rome, Italy.The Director of the Institute for Environmental Studies Michael Slattery is one of the faculty members for the trips to Costa Rica and South Africa. Slattery said the trip to Costa Rica focuses on the ecosystems and geology of the rainforest.The South Africa trip, Slattery said, has an emphasis on rhino conservation in areas such as the Amakhala Game Reserve. Students on this trip will also experience South Africa’s rapid population increase by visiting Soweto to understand apartheid and its geopolitical aspects.“These experiences are truly transformative,” Slattery said. “It gives students hands-on experience that doesn’t happen in the classroom.”The FTDM program going to Rome is a chance to take two classes at once, Colin Tait, an assistant professor in the FTDM department, said. The first half of the trip focuses on the sports culture in Rome and the second half of the trip focuses on Rome as a cinematic city.John Sprague, the CIEE representative, helped students with their questions during the fair.The two partner programs offered by TCU are the Council on International Educational Exchange (CIEE) and the Institute for the International Education of Students (IES). Both programs offer multiple programs to multiple locations.Severson said she was impressed with the amount of participation in this year’s fair.“Everybody is working to send students abroad because they know how important it is,” Severson said. “This is the single, most impactful learning experience a student can have.”The summer study abroad application opens at 9 a.m. on Oct. 8. The deadline is Jan. 15. Twitter Students look at the prizes they can receive after getting five stickers for their passport. Linkedin Tobi Carterhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tobi-carter/ Linkedin TCU Frog Camps returning to more traditional look this summer Tobi is a senior journalism major from Lewisville, Texas. She works as the downtown Fort Worth multimedia reporter.last_img read more

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George Bush to talk long history with investments

first_imgFacebook Baseball season recap: Rebuilding turns to reloading after surprise CWS trip Twitter printHe’s been a U.S. president, a state governor and an MLB owner, but when George W. Bush comes to speak at TCU on Friday, it’ll be his experience in the investing world that will be the topic of the discussion.Bush will speak today in the Brown-Lupton University Union for the 14th annual TCU Investment Strategies Conference because of his professional career managing and investing in several corporations.Bush’s wide variety of past professions makes him uniquely qualified to speak, according to Elaine Cole, a public relations manager for the Neeley School of Business.“We look forward to hearing former President Bush talk about his years in the White House, his experiences with other world leaders, leadership and decision-making, and domestic and international issues, all of which affect the financial market,” Cole wrote in an email. Bush’s career began shortly after he graduated from Harvard Business School with the formation of Arbusto Energy Inc., according to the Washington Post. Bush capitalized on family connections and drew on a wide pool of investors.While Arbusto never became a worldwide success, the connections that Bush used would prove invaluable in the future during his progression into politics.He found more success with the Harken Energy Corporation, earning $835,000 by unloading the majority of his shares in the 1990s.However, it was his ownership of the Texas Rangers that proved to be his most savvy financial move, according to CNN.  The public paid for the majority of the funding for the Ballpark at Arlington, and Bush flipped a $600,000 investment into a profit over $15 million.After he left the investment world and entered the White House, Bush maintained a legislative influence in the financial markets.Bush favored a hands-off approach to investment regulation. Under his administration, the Securities and Exchange Commission decreased regulation on investment banks.While the majority of his presidency was occupied by the dual wars in the Middle East and the creeping financial crisis that came to a head in 2008, Bush still had a strong rapport with the investing world.Bush’s personality was his biggest asset, and it’s always made him an entertaining speaker, all politics aside. Associated Press journalist Ben Feller described Bush as a  “fast-moving, phrase-mangling Texan who stays upbeat even though his country is not.”It’s this personality that’ll be on display along with more than three decades of investing experience when Bush takes the mic this afternoon. Former President George W. Bush speaks at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring Our Heroes program and the George W. Bush Institute’s Military Service Initiative national summit, Wednesday, June 24, 2015, at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in Washington. The summit focuses on creating employment opportunities for post-9/11 veterans and military families. (AP Photo/Molly Riley) Grant McGalliardhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grant-mcgalliard/ Grant McGalliardhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grant-mcgalliard/ Facebook Linkedin Phi Kappa Sigma executive director, chapter president respond to dismissal Grant McGalliard is a senior journalism and political science major from Bay City, Texas. He’s worked in everything from sports to student organizations at TCU, and recently began blogging with the Dallas Morning News. In his spare time, Grant enjoys tweeting far too much, pretending he knows more than he does about Premier League soccer, and listening to the music of Kanye West. Grant McGalliardhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grant-mcgalliard/ TCU students receive evacuation text by mistake + posts ReddIt The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years Grant McGalliard Linkedin Twitter Previous articleJose Antonio Vargas, undocumented immigrant, to talk diversity and immigrationNext articleTCU sophomore remembered for her joy Grant McGalliard RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TCU Frog Camps returning to more traditional look this summer ReddIt TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history TCU removes Phi Kappa Sigma for hazing and other misconduct Grant McGalliardhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grant-mcgalliard/last_img read more

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Men’s tennis squanders big lead in loss at Columbia

first_imgLinkedin Twitter Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ A COVID-19 Charles Schwab Challenge TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Women’s golf heads to Oklahoma for chance at first Big 12 title + posts Branson is a junior journalism major from Fort Worth, Texas. He enjoys writing about all sports and plans to go to law school after graduation. Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ Twitter Facebook Branson Nelson Iqbal leads women’s golf to fourth-place finish at Big 12 Tournament Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ Equestrian earns last seed in NCEA team bracket printThe No. 24 Horned Frogs were unable to capitalize on a 3-0 lead against No. 19 Columbia on Sunday, dropping four straight singles-points to lose the match 4-3.“We had a full lineup today and we don’t have any excuses,” TCU head coach David Roditi said. “Some of our guys need to get in better shape and the only blame is on them.”The afternoon opened with TCU taking the doubles point by winning two of the three matches. After seniors Jerry Lopez and Felipe Escobar narrowly lost their match, junior Cameron Norrie and sophomore Reese Stalder defeated No. 30 Shawn Hadavi and Jackie Tang 7-6 (7-0) in a tiebreaker.Junior Guillermo Nunez and sophomore Alex Rybakov clinched the doubles point winning their fifth straight match against Columbia’s No. 14 duo of Christopher Grant and Adam Ambrozy in yet another tiebreaker 7-6 (7-2). TCU went on to win the next two singles matches on courts one and two. No. 35 Norrie defeated No. 39 Hadavi 6-2, 6-1, and Rybakov topped No. 87 Victor Pham 6-3, 6-1.With the match seemingly in hand, the Frogs needed one more win to clinch their first victory against a ranked team this season.After losses by Escobar (6-1, 6-2), Lopez (6-2, 6-4) and No. 80 Nunez (6-3, 3-6, 6-2), the match came down to court five between Stalder and William Matheson. Matheson took set one (6-3), Stalder took set two (6-3), but Matheson won a tiebreaker in set three that wrapped up an incredible comeback by the Lions.TCU is now 3-3 on the season, continuing a very underwhelming start to 2017 after the Frogs had been ranked as high as seventh in early January.Roditi said Sunday’s debacle was unacceptable.“As a coach, it is a lot easier to accept losses when they play well and beat you, but losing because we were out-competed is impossible to accept,” he said.The Horned Frogs will have plenty of time to improve before welcoming the University of Central Florida to Fort Worth on Saturday Feb. 25. Match time is set for 1 p.m. Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ ReddIt Linkedin Facebook World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution ReddIt Previous articleCelebrity Dish (Ep. 12 – Grammy’s, Twins and more)Next articleStudents react to Plain White T’s Branson Nelson RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Photo Courtesy of gofrogs.com Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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Sights from the first half of the Alamo Bowl

first_imgBlack, Latinx communities disproportionately affected by COVID-19 Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Facebook Community Commons gives students place to go to leave their rooms Cristian Arguetasotohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cristian-arguetasoto/ ReddIt Cristian is a senior Journalism major and Studio Art minor at TCU. He is a Managing Editor at TCU360. He enjoys landscape photography and learning new photo techniques. Cristian Arguetasotohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cristian-arguetasoto/ Linkedin Website| + posts ReddIt printTCU out-gained Stanford by seven yards, 167-160, in the first half but trailed entering halftime, 21-10. Linkedin Cristian Arguetasotohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cristian-arguetasoto/ Cristian Arguetasoto COVID-19 cases prompt TCU to postpone home opener against football rival SMU Photo by Cristian ArguetaSoto Facebook Twitter TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Twitter Previous articleThrowback Thursday: Horned Frogs remember Alamo Bowl victory over OregonNext articleHorned Frogs comeback from 18 points down to defeat Stanford in the Alamo Bowl Cristian Arguetasoto RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TCU to research its history with racism, slavery and the Confederacy Cristian Arguetasotohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cristian-arguetasoto/ TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hellolast_img read more

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