Odessa police arrest suspect in shooting

first_img Pinterest WhatsApp Facebook Facebook By admin – April 2, 2018 Twitter Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleFive things you need to know today, April 2Next articleOPD: Citizen’s arrest leads to arrest of fugitive admin Arturo Villa Police charged a wanted fugitive Friday after he reportedly fired several rounds into the air while driving in the 400 block of Ellis Drive.Officers were called about shots being fired Friday in that area, an Odessa Police Department news release stated, where the complainant told officers the driver of a red Kia Optima had been firing a gun into the air.A shell casing was found in the block, and officers had seen a red Kia Optima traveling south in the 300 block of Lotteman Drive before turning right onto Ellis Drive, the release detailed.The release stated the vehicle then turned south onto Ranchland Avenue before turning into the west alley of the 3000 block of Ranchland Avenue, and then turned south before striking a gas meter and guardrail behind the 500 block of West University Boulevard. The driver, 30-year-old Arturo Villa, then exited the vehicle and was last seen running east in the alley.Witnesses told the police Villa had been wearing a white tank top and tan shorts, the release detailed, and Villa was later found in the courtyard of the College Terrace Apartments.Villa initially gave officers a false name, the release stated, but was eventually identified, and it was revealed that he had two outstanding warrants for running a stop sign and failing to appear in court.The release detailed a pistol was also found in the red Kia Optima.Officers charged Villa with unlawful carrying of a weapon, a class A misdemeanor, false identification — fugitive from justice, a class A misdemeanor, and leaving the scene of an accident, a class B misdemeanor.Jail records show Villa was taken to the Ector County Detention Center Friday and was released Saturday on three bonds totaling $2,500. Local NewsCrime Odessa police arrest suspect in shooting Pinterestlast_img read more

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It’s rocket science for these NTO students

first_img Previous articleGOOD NEWS: Brothers embark on medical pathwayNext articleBUILDING PERMITS: Jan. 17 Digital AIM Web Support It’s rocket science for these NTO students WhatsApp EducationECISDLocal News WhatsApp Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – January 17, 2021 Pinterestcenter_img Facebook TAGS  Twitter For students in Maria Lopez’s class, it is rocket science. Lopez, the pre Advanced Placement and physics/rocketry teacher at George H.W. Bush New Tech Odessa, has a small but dedicated group of students who take pride in building their spacecrafts. Because of COVID-19 restrictions, there are just a few coming to class in person. Recently they tried launching some of their rockets at Ratliff Stadium in preparation for the Systems Go Launch in May in Fredericksburg. With COVID-19 restrictions, Lopez said, only the captain, electronics bay engineering and recovery expert can go. She’s hoping that will change by the time the launch rolls around. Eighteen year-old senior Nayeli Olivarez said math and science are her best subjects. She heard about the rocketry program her junior year in high school and decided to try it. “It’s cool to understand how rockets work and how we build them and stuff,” Olivarez said. One of her rockets had two wings instead of three and its engine was partially falling out. It launched, but it kind of did a corkscrew and came back down. Lopez said Olivarez’ rocket “went kind of crazy because it was really unstable. …” Nathan Sudell, an 18-year-old senior, and Jerad Olivera, a 17-year-old senior, are enjoying themselves as well. “It’s pretty exciting because you’ve been spending weeks on this project that you’ve been hoping it will work and not crash into somebody and actually perform nicely. There’s been some that have flown really, really well. There’s been some mess ups,” Olivera said. Both have enjoyed the process of rocket building. “I really like the amount of freedom you get to build the rocket,” Sudell said. “It’s really cool to have that trial and error,” Olivera said. “You learn from your mistakes. You also learn more variables like now we’re going to start using our own rocketry simulations. We can see how they launch, it will be cool to look at that, actually test our rockets in virtual space.” Olivera said it takes time to build the rockets, but it’s fun and you have to be patient especially because the glue they use takes time to set. “But once it sets, it’s really hard for it to come off and it’s a lot of fun. It’s challenging. It gives you that sense of freedom and once you put it all together and see how it’s supposed to look from your starting point it’s really satisfying, especially when you get to see it launch and it performs well,” Olivera said. He added that he played with a lot of Legos when he was little. Sudell said he only had two or three Lego sets, but he’s thinking he’d like to have some now. Lopez said she has 23 students total and it’s been difficult to keep them engaged and get them to attend class in person. Many have opted to go virtual. “The challenge is that rocketry is such a hands-on class,” and even getting participation is hard and she doesn’t want to give the students busy work. “You try to do the very best that you can with kids who come to class and those that don’t come to class. The challenge is getting them to come to class. I’m trying to integrate as much as I can,” Lopez said. Pinterest Twitterlast_img read more

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Abbott promises energy industry protection

first_img Twitter Abbott promises energy industry protection By Digital AIM Web Support – January 28, 2021 Facebook Local NewsGovernmentState Facebook WhatsApp WhatsAppcenter_img TAGS  Pinterest Twitter Gov. Greg Abbott led an Odessa roundtable discussion at midday Thursday with 16 representatives of all levels of the energy industry and ended by signing an executive order directing all state agencies to fight any constraints that the Biden Administration or Environmental Protection Agency impose or try to impose. Flanked by Cudd Energy Services General Manager Clint Walker and Diamondback Energy CEO Travis Stice, Abbott held up the order and said to applause, “This is a homework assignment for every agency in Texas. “I’m directing them to use all their lawful powers and tools to challenge any federal action that threatens the vitality of the energy industry, in which hundreds of thousands of Texans are employed and from which billions of dollars in taxes and royalties flow.” Citing a comment by Cudd Pump Specialist Jesus Macias, Abbott said, “Jesus made it clear that blue-collar workers on the front lines need to know that they will continue to have jobs and he pointed out that it’s wrong for a president or anybody else to act like these jobs could be ended today. “Here in the State of Texas, we’re not going to say people need to change jobs. We’ll protect the energy sector from any kind of hostile attack launched from Washington, D.C. Biden’s embrace of the Green New Deal is a job-killer and a wrecking ball to this industry that Texas has provided to the United States of America.” Abbott said Biden has hurt energy mainly by signing the Paris Climate Agreement and prohibiting new drilling on federal lands and he said more Green New Deal-inspired actions may be expected. “I believe the Biden Administration will put on steroids what the Obama Administration did, using the EPA in a very heavy-handed way to impose onerous requirements on the oil and gas sector and make it impossible for them to do business the way the way they do it today,” he said. Noting that the City of San Francisco, Calif., has banned the use of natural gas in such appliances as stoves and water heaters in all new structures, Abbott said to applause that he will propose legislation prohibiting Texas cities and counties “from using political correctness to dictate what energy source you use. Acknowledging the presence of State Reps. Brooks Landgraf of Odessa and Tom Craddick of Midland while saying he would count on their support, Abbott added, “My goal is to cut regulations to make it easier for the oil and gas industry to do business. “When I was attorney general (from 2002-2015) and the Obama Administration was lodging challenge after challenge, I filed 31 lawsuits, most of them against the EPA, and we will continue with that litigation strategy.” Asked by the Odessa American what are the principal factors in winning a suit vs. the EPA, Abbott said, “By showing that they have gone beyond the bounds of what they’ve been authorized to do. “It’s typical of the bureaucracy to attempt to circumvent the laws passed by Congress.” During a news conference in the interior of the Cudd complex off South JBS Parkway, the governor noted the backdrop of an enormous oilfield truck and asked Walker what it was, to which the hardhat-wearing general manager quipped, “It’s a piece of equipment.” Abbott said he will also seek to improve Permian Basin roads so that such trucks may be felicitously moved and citizens will be safer. In a statement after the event, Landgraf said in part, “I appreciate Gov. Abbott’s leadership here. “His order demonstrates the importance of oil and gas, specifically the significance of the work we do in the Permian Basin. In addition to all the jobs the industry creates, our roads, schools and nearly every other service provided by the state directly benefit from revenue generated by oil and gas production.” Landgraf noted that he and the other members of the Texas Legislature convened Jan. 12 at the Capitol in Austin for their biennial 140-day regular session “to vote on legislation and pass a balanced state budget.” Renae Eze, Abbott’s press secretary, said Odessa was the only trip on the governor’s Thursday schedule. Previous article‘Be Safe, Drive Smart’ campaign offers tips to motoristsNext articleAt Sundance, pandemic dramas unfold on screen and off Digital AIM Web Support Pinterestlast_img read more

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AmTrust Announces Quarterly Cash Dividends on Preferred Stock

first_imgLocal NewsBusiness Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – February 8, 2021 7.625% 6.750% 7.750% A NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 8, 2021– AmTrust Financial Services, Inc. (“AmTrust” or the “Company”) today announced that its Board of Directors has approved a cash dividend per share on the following series of non-cumulative preferred stock: Series B $0.421875 WhatsApp 7.500% D Dividend WhatsApp $0.484375 7.250% Previous articleVortus Investments Announces the Promotions of Brian Hansen, Frank Lamsens and Ross CunninghamNext articleSeagate Technology to Host a Virtual Analyst Event on February 24, 2021 Digital AIM Web Supportcenter_img E C $0.476563 Twitter Twitter Pinterest The preferred dividends will be payable March 15, 2021 to stockholders of record on March 1, 2021. About AmTrust Financial Services, Inc. AmTrust Financial Services, Inc., a multinational insurance holding company headquartered in New York, offers specialty property and casualty insurance products, including workers’ compensation, business owner’s policy (BOP), general liability and extended service and warranty coverage. For more information about AmTrust, visit www.amtrustfinancial.com. View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210208005204/en/ CONTACT: AmTrust Financial Services Chaya Cooperberg EVP, Chief People and Communications Officer [email protected] (646) 458-3332 KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA NEW YORK INDUSTRY KEYWORD: FINANCE BANKING PROFESSIONAL SERVICES OTHER PROFESSIONAL SERVICES INSURANCE SOURCE: AmTrust Financial Services, Inc. Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/08/2021 08:30 AM/DISC: 02/08/2021 08:30 AM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210208005204/en F $0.453125 Pinterest TAGS  6.950% $0.468750 Rate $0.434375 AmTrust Announces Quarterly Cash Dividends on Preferred Stock Facebooklast_img read more

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What to watch as Trump’s 2nd impeachment trial kicks off

first_img WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial begins on Tuesday, a solemn proceeding that will force lawmakers to relive the violent events of Jan. 6 as House Democrats prosecute their case for “incitement of insurrection.” The nine Democratic impeachment managers for the House, which impeached Trump last month, argue that he alone was responsible for inciting the mob of supporters who broke into the U.S. Capitol and interrupted the presidential electoral count. Lawyers for Trump argue that the trial is unconstitutional and say the former president was exercising freedom of speech when he told his supporters to “fight like hell” to overturn his defeat. The arguments against conviction are expected to be persuasive with Senate Republicans, most of whom have signaled that they will vote to acquit. The trial is expected to last into the weekend and possibly longer. It will begin midday Tuesday and could go late into some evenings. What to watch as the trial kicks off: FIRST, AN EFFORT TO DISMISS Tuesday’s proceedings will begin with a debate to dismiss the trial before it even begins. Trump’s lawyers have argued the trial is moot now that Trump is out of office, and 45 Senate Republicans have already voted once to move forward with an effort to dismiss the trial on those grounds. The Senate will debate the constitutionality of the trial for four hours on Tuesday and then hold a vote on whether to dismiss it. The effort to dismiss is expected to fail, allowing arguments in the trial to begin on Wednesday. Democrats point to the opinion of many legal scholars — including conservatives — who say the trial is valid under the Constitution. They point to an 1876 impeachment trial of a secretary of war who had resigned and note that Trump was impeached before he left office. Trump’s lawyers dismiss that precedent and say language in the Constitution is on their side. WEDNESDAY: ARGUMENTS BEGIN The House managers will present their arguments first, beginning Wednesday. Each side will have up to 16 hours, running no more than eight hours per day. The Democrats are expected to try and take advantage of the senators’ own experiences, tapping into their emotions as they describe in detail — and show on video — what happened as the mob broke through police barriers, injured law enforcement officers, ransacked the Capitol and hunted for lawmakers. The carnage led to five deaths. The impeachment managers have argued that the mob subverted democracy and that Trump was “singularly” responsible for their actions after months of falsely saying there was widespread fraud in the election. They will appeal to Senate Republicans to vote to convict after most of them criticized Trump in the wake of the riots, with many saying he was responsible for the violence. There was no widespread fraud in the election. Election officials across the country, and even then-Attorney General William Barr, contradicted Trump’s claims, and dozens of legal challenges to the election put forth by Trump and his allies were dismissed. It appears unlikely, for now, that there will be witnesses at the trial. But the managers can ask for a Senate vote on calling witnesses if they so choose. TRUMP’S TEAM HITS BACK Defense arguments are likely to begin Friday. In their main filing with the Senate, Trump’s lawyers made clear that they will not only argue against the trial on process grounds, but also present a full-throated defense of Trump’s actions that day and why they believe he did not incite the riot. While the Democrats are expected to appeal to the senators’ emotions, Trump’s lawyers have signaled they will try and tap into raw partisan anger. They repeatedly go after the Democrats personally in the brief, describing their case as a “selfish attempt by Democratic leadership in the House to prey upon the feelings of horror and confusion” and another example of “Trump derangement syndrome” after four years of trying to drive him out of office. The lawyers argue that Trump’s words “fight like hell” did not mean to literally fight, that the rioters acted on their own accord. A (LESS) CAPTIVE AUDIENCE As they were last year, at Trump’s first impeachment trial, senators are expected to listen to every word of the arguments before they cast their votes. But this trial will look a bit different than the last one due to COVID-19 restrictions. To protect against the virus, senators don’t have to be stuck at their desks for the entirety of the trial, and will be allowed to spread out in the upper galleries or watch a video feed in a room just off the chamber. REPUBLICANS TO WATCH Five Republican senators voted with Democrats two weeks ago not to dismiss the trial on constitutional grounds. Those senators so far appear the most likely to vote to convict Trump. The five senators, all of whom have harshly criticized the president’s behavior, are Susan Collins of Maine, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. Democrats appear to have little chance of persuading 17 Republicans to find Trump guilty, the minimum number that they would need for conviction. But some GOP senators who voted in favor of the effort to dismiss, such as Rob Portman of Ohio and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, have said they are coming into the trial with an open mind. Democrats are likely to focus, too, on senators who are retiring in 2022 and will have less to lose politically if they vote to convict. In addition to Toomey and Portman, also retiring are Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby and North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr. ——— Associated Press writers Lisa Mascaro and Eric Tucker contributed to this report. Pinterest By Digital AIM Web Support – February 9, 2021 Previous articleGlobal Antacid Market Forecast to 2027: COVID-19 Impacts by Dosage Form (Tablet, Liquid, Others), Drug Class (Proton pump inhibitors, H2 Antagonist, Acid neutralizers) & Distribution Channel – ResearchAndMarkets.comNext articleGlobal Animal Genetics Market Forecast to 2027 by Product (Poultry, Porcine, Bovine, Canine), Material (Semen and Embryo), and Services (DNA Typing, Genetic Trait Tests, Genetic Disease Tests) – ResearchAndMarkets.com Digital AIM Web Support What to watch as Trump’s 2nd impeachment trial kicks off Facebook Twitter Pinterestcenter_img Twitter WhatsApp Local NewsUS News WhatsApp TAGS  Facebooklast_img read more

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The Latest: Harris talks federal relief in weather emergency

first_img Pinterest Previous articleCockburn, Dosunmu lead No. 5 Illini past Northwestern 73-66Next articlePandemic politicking: Israel’s election sprint echoes US’s Digital AIM Web Support By Digital AIM Web Support – February 17, 2021 WhatsApp TAGS  Twitter Local NewsStateUS News The Latest: Harris talks federal relief in weather emergencycenter_img Facebook Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest Pierre Scott, a 59 year-old guest and volunteer at a warming center run by OurCalling, changed socks on his socially-distanced cot at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021. Scott like a lot of other folks, found refuge from the overnight sub-zero temperatures. Twitterlast_img read more

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Protests swell after Myanmar junta raises specter of force

first_imgLocal NewsWorld News Pinterest By Digital AIM Web Support – February 22, 2021 Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleHalf a million dead in US, confirming virus’s tragic reachNext articlePosiflex anuncia la certificación de Google Mobile Services para Android 10 para las plataformas de quioscos Digital AIM Web Support Anti-coup protesters flash the three-fingered salute outside the Hledan Centre in Yangon, Myanmar Monday, Feb. 22, 2021. Protesters gathered in Myanmar’s biggest city Monday despite the ruling junta’s thinly veiled threat to use lethal force if people answered a call for a general strike opposing the military takeover three weeks ago. Pinterestcenter_img Facebook Twitter Twitter Protests swell after Myanmar junta raises specter of force WhatsApp TAGS  last_img read more

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Study underway at Starlight Therapeutic Riding Center

first_img Pinterest Twitter Local News Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleCBS7 and Midland Health to air documentary on substance abuseNext articleMOSC hosts TAKE3 on stage OA Lifecenter_img TAGSanxietycognitive-behavioral therapyEquine Facilitated TherapyGina FriedmanStarlight Therapeutic Riding CenterStephanie Moses Facebook Study underway at Starlight Therapeutic Riding Center By OA Life – April 27, 2021 Facebook Equine Facilitated Therapy is the combined use of horses, a licensed therapist, and an equine specialist working with participants to address various therapeutic treatment goals. (Courtesy Photo) MIDLAND Starlight Therapeutic Riding Center, Inc. and Texas Tech Associate Professor of Psychology, Stephanie Moses, Ph, D. are collaborating in an Equine Facilitated Therapy (EFT) study to learn more about the effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy on youth with anxiety.Starlight Executive Director, Gina Friedman, said the non-profit developed the program in response to new mental-health needs brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic.“Over the past year, there has been an increase in the number of inquiries by families on behalf of individuals suffering from anxiety, stress, and other mental-health concerns,” Friedman said. “While we offer several horsemanship programs that are responsive to these needs, we are now launching a partnership with a licensed, certified mental-health practitioner to study the benefits of EFT for those looking for a different approach to improve mental wellness.”EFT is the combined use of horses, a licensed therapist, and an equine specialist working with participants to address various therapeutic treatment goals. EFT gives individuals an opportunity to learn about themselves and others by participating in activities with the horses, then processing feelings, behaviors, and patterns with the therapist’s help.Friedman said that spending time outdoors in nature instead of sitting in an office across from a therapist is often more appealing to teens. “It can be an attractive option for an adolescent who is hesitant about traditional therapy,” she said. “Being outside and interacting with the horses can motivate a young person to seek or agree to professional help.”“The services that we provide for individuals and their families within our community are non-traditional, unique, and powerful,” Friedman said. “Being at the barn and interacting with our horses often brings harmony and tranquility to those who visit us. Our goal is to create awareness about the benefits of EFT and give individuals who suffer from anxiety an alternative to traditional therapy.”Starlight Therapeutic Riding Center, Inc. is located at 5401 Polo Club Road in Midland.For more information, call 432-741-5773 or visit www.starlightmidland.org.last_img read more

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ECTOR COUNTY FELONY INDICTMENTS: May 10, 2021

first_imgCrimeFelony Indictments Pinterest ECTOR COUNTY FELONY INDICTMENTS: May 10, 2021 Twitter WhatsApp By Odessa American – May 10, 2021 The following is a list of felony indictments by an Ector County grand jury. The list does not include those who have yet to be arrested.ABANDON ENDANGER CHILD INTENTIONAL/KNOWINGLY/RECKLESS/CRIME NEGLIGENCE Rocio Rodriguez, 46, was indicted April 7 on abandon endanger child intentional/knowingly/reckless/crime negligence, state jail felony.ASSAULTChristopher Ramos, 22, was indicted Aug. 7, 2018 on assault on a public servant, third degree felony.Jacob Ray Garza-Rodriguez, 27, was indicted Oct. 12, 2020 on assault family/house member impede breath/circulation, third degree felony.James Lonnie Render, III, 36, was indicted Aug. 19, 2019 on aggravated sexual assault child, first degree felony.BURGLARYJoe Richard Ochoa, 52, was indicted May 1, 2020 on burglary of building, state jail felony.CRIMINAL MISCHIEFMia Nygaard, 21, was indicted May 1, 2020 on criminal mischief, more than $2,500, but less than $30,000, state jail felony.DEADLY CONDUCTEmmanuel Valderaz Granados, 33, was indicted Aug. 18, 2020 on deadly conduct, third degree felony.FAIL TO COMPLY SEX OFF DUTY TO REGISTER LIFE/ANNUALPaul Michael Martinez, 42, was indicted Aug. 18, 2020 on fail to comply sex off duty to register life/annual, third degree felony.FAIL TO STOP AND RENDER AIDJesus Gerardo Lozano-Ramos, 46, was indicted Oct. 9, 2018 on fail to stop and render aid, felony unassigned.FORGERYZurydzaday Y. Cazares-Rascon, 27, was indicted Sept. 14, 2020 on forgery of a financial instrument, more than $30,000, but less than $150,000, third degree felony.INJURY CHILD/ELDERLY/DISABLE WITH INTENT BODILY INJURYPriscilla J. Blanco, 51, was indicted April 7 on injury child/elderly/disable with intent bodily injury, third degree felony.MANUFACTURE DELIVERY OF A CONTROLLED SUBSTANCEJoshua Mendez, 22, was indicted July 20, 2020 on manufacture delivery of a controlled substance, more than four grams, but less than 200 grams, first degree felony.THEFTAlejandro Aranda, 42, was indicted Aug. 18, 2020 on theft prop, more than $2,500, but less than $30,000, state jail felony.Devon James-Cole Pickett, 31, was indicted May 21, 2020 on theft property, more than $2,500, but less than $30,000, state jail felony.UNLICENSED POSSESSION FIREARM BY FELONParrish Glenn King, 27, was indicted Dec. 18, 2020 on unlicensed possession firearm by felon, third degree felony. Facebookcenter_img TAGSEctor Countyindictments Twitter Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleECTOR COUNTY FELONY DISPOSITIONS: May 10, 2021Next articleNATIONAL VIEW: Sacramento’s litany of mostly ineffective, nonsensical gun bills Odessa Americanlast_img read more

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GOOD NEWS: Sul Ross adds 10 Lobos to All-Conference Team

first_img Facebook WhatsApp CommunityGood NewsLocal News Pinterest Twitter Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleMANNING: Biden’s America resembles the bad old days of 1973Next articleLANDGRAF: Keep our churches open OA Lifecenter_img Pinterest Twitter By OA Life – May 23, 2021 GOOD NEWS: Sul Ross adds 10 Lobos to All-Conference Team TAGSAmerican Southwest ConferencebaseballFreshman of the YearNewcomer of the YearSul Ross State University ALPINE Baseball took home several ASC accolades including Freshman of the Year and Newcomer of the Year as 10 Lobos were listed to the 2021 American Southwest Conference baseball awards and all-conference teams in an announcement made May 17 by the conference office.Isaac Aleman – SS: Freshman of the Year – Honorable MentionAleman slashed .354 with 35 hits, 19 runs, two home runs, 21 RBI and two steals in his freshman campaign. His eight doubles were good enough for second on the team and he was also second in walks with 14.Carsen Thor – 1B: Newcomer of the Year – All-Conference First TeamThor led the Lobos in several categories with a .379 average, 50 hits, and 43 RBI. He was tied in runs scored with 32 and was second-best in home runs with seven and total bases with 80.His 43 runs batted in were good for second-best in the ASC.Thor began his Sul Ross career with an ASC Hitter of the Week nod on Feb. 17 after hitting .625 (5-for-8) with six RBI, five runs scored and a 1.000 slugging percentage in a two-game sweep of University of Dallas.Ashton Leech – DH: All-Conference Second TeamLeech batted .408 in 71 at bats during his senior campaign. He had 29 hits, a second-best nine doubles, a team-high 25 walks, 14 RBI and four stolen bases.Jorge Marquez – OF: All-Conference Third TeamMarquez led the Lobos in doubles, triples and home runs with 11, three and eight respectively. He batted .347 on the season and was only behind Thor with 43 hits and 31 RBI. He tied Thor with 32 runs scored and led the Lobos with eight stolen bases in 11 attempts.It is his second time on the all-conference list after being named to the honorable mention in 2019.Tyler Tupper – 2B: Honorable MentionTupper batted .327 on the season with 16 hits, 12 runs scored and three RBI.Jared Lorenz – 3B: Honorable MentionLorenz hit .258 on the season but belted seven home runs and 21 RBI. He scored 23 runs and also stole four bases.He twice came up clutch with walk-off home runs on Feb. 12 against University of Dallas and April 16 against Concordia.Lorenz was named ASC Hitter of the Week on April 26 after batting .500 (7-for-14) with two home runs, three doubles, nine runs batted in, seven runs scored, and 16 total bases against McMurry.Tye Lindsey – OF: Honorable MentionLindsey batted .337 on the season with three home runs, five doubles, 25 RBI and 19 runs scored. He also stole five bases.Richard Bailey – OF: Honorable MentionBailey finished with a .271 average but had 26 hits, six home runs, seven doubles, two triples, swiped four bases, scored 26 runs and tied Lindsey for a third-best 25 runs batted in.Sam Russell – SP: Honorable MentionRussell led the team with four wins and 61.1 innings pitched on the season. He posted a 6.31 earned run average in 10 starts and 12 appearances. His two complete games and 54 strikeouts were also team-highs.He matched a career-high 11 strikeouts in a game on April 23 with a complete game win over McMurry.Isaiah Moya – SP: Honorable MentionMoya finished with three wins on the season and a 6.34 ERA. His 61 innings pitched and 50 strikeouts were both good for second on the team.His lone complete game came on April 1 when he surrendered no earned runs, striking out six and walking none in a 6-2 win against Mary Hardin-Baylor.last_img read more

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