Relaxing is not an option for Ross Ford

first_imgRoss ford during the 2011 Six NationsIt’s everyone’s dream day. The boss comes into work at the busiest, most stressful time of year and says: “You’ve worked hard enough this year, I don’t want you to get burned out, so why don’t you take the rest of the year off.”That is the scenario Ross Ford was confronted with when Scotland coach Andy Robinson gave five Scotland players the rest of the season off from their club commitments so that they could prepare for the World Cup. It was, says the hooker, one from left-field.“I never saw it coming,” he laughs. “It’s a strange one to get your head around, but I soon got used to the idea. Except for injuries, I’ve never had any time off, and the past couple of seasons have been long, with a lot of miles going on the clock. I’ve played a lot of rugby.”Although the Edinburgh hooker felt a little jaded after the RBS 6 Nations, that’s usual for the end of the season and it felt odd not to be involved. Some team-mates who were still on full rations also had a dig at the ‘Famous Five’. The jealousy wasn’t to last for long though.“We’re not playing in games or doing contact until the end of the season and a few of the other boys liked the sound of that,” he says.“But then they saw that although we’re only in three days a week, we’re being absolutely beasted. They soon changed their minds!”Ford says that the most unexpected benefit of Robinson’s decision is that for once he can switch off. A worrier by nature, he says that he’ll usually spend most of the season thinking about rugby and “running through the lineout calls in my head 24/7”. This way, he says, “for once rugby’s not weighing on my mind”.The decision to also give Edinburgh’s Allan Jacobsen, plus Glasgow’s Richie Gray, Al Kellock and John Barclay the season off underlines the fact that neither Scottish club is in contention for the Magners League play-offs, while the loss of lock Scott MacLeod to Japan and fly-half David Blair to a teaching career hardly represents a vote of approval for the Scottish professional game.“It’s been a difficult year at Edinburgh,” agrees Ford. “We’ve put together glimpses of great rugby, with a good 15 or 20 minutes in every half, but we’ve been too inconsistent. There are good young players coming through but it certainly hasn’t been a vintage year.”Yet he still turned down a whole slew of offers from England and France to sign with Edinburgh for another three years. “The World Cup was the big factor. At Edinburgh I get looked after in the right way, with one eye on my international career. Having this rest period also means that I’ll come back from the World Cup fresh. The off-season is getting so short now you never really get that chance to get a good pre-season.”Despite having 44 caps, he still feels he has a lot to prove with Scotland. “This has been a disappointing season for me; I’ve not been happy with my performances and have been very frustrated by my form. If I had an end-of-term report it wouldn’t say ‘could do better’, it’d say ‘must do better’.” Scotland’s scrum was rock solid last autumn but it was shunted all over the shop in the Six Nations. Ford says he doesn’t know what went wrong, but could say that the scrum isn’t his sole responsibility. But it’s clear he doesn’t feel the same way about the lineout, which malfunctioned badly.“The poor lineouts in the Six Nations were my fault, there’s no one else to blame. There were three overthrows against France and it went on from there. I wasn’t putting the ball where it should’ve gone, and it was especially disappointing against England as they had done their homework and read our lineouts well. The standard of my lineout work just wasn’t acceptable.”Robinson is hoping that a period away from contact will allow Ford to practise his throwing-in, get some aerobic work under his belt and retrieve his misplaced mojo. He will be back for the warm-up games against Ireland and Italy, so says there’s no chance of being undercooked for the World Cup. He feels that if Scotland perform at 90-95% of capacity, as he believes they have done in the majority of games under Robinson, then they will advance from a tricky group that pits them against England, Argentina, Romania and Georgia.“On our tour of Argentina last year we won both Tests and that was a massive confidence boost for us because we now know we can beat them. As for England, we went down to Twickenham with a malfunctioning lineout and scrum, won very little set-piece ball and consequently put ourselves under the cosh for most of the game, and were still close enough to win the game in the last quarter. Down in New Zealand, with the locals cheering us on, it’ll be a very different story. The important thing now is that we concentrate on our own form, and I suppose that’s what the time off is all about.”Whether it has worked will only become clear on 1 October at Eden Park when Ford and Scotland meet England.This article appeared in the June 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visitcenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Read More →

England edged out on second day of Gold Coast Sevens

first_img Chris Cracknell breaks through New Zealand’s defenceEngland were left frustrated after being edged out by New Zealand and Samoa in their second day games at the Gold Coast Sevens.They gave series champions New Zealand their toughest test of the day in the Cup quarter final – with tries from Chris Cracknell and Isoa Damudamu – before going down 24-14. Then they dominated long spells of their Plate semi-final against Samoa, Mathew Turner scoring twice, before Paul Perez and Taulagi Afamasaga snatched an unlikely win for the Islanders.Ben Ryan’s side picked up 10 points from their weekend’s work in the opening round of the HSBC Sevens World Series. But captain Greg Barden believes there is much more to come – and England have the next two legs in Dubai (December 2-3) and Port Elizabeth (December 9-10) to put things right.“The margins in this game are so small and a few things did go against us today but you create your own luck and we’ve just got to keep taking small steps forward, which we certainly are doing,” said Barden. “It is hard. We hate losing, we’re here to win and we’re bitterly disappointed. But we’ve got a chance to put it right straight away next week and that’s our aim now. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS GOLD COAST, AUSTRALIA – NOVEMBER 26: Chris Cracknell of England breaks through the New Zealand defence during the match between England and New Zealand on day two of the Gold Coast Sevens World Series at Skilled Park on November 26, 2011 in Gold Coast, Australia. (Photo by Chris Hyde/Getty Images) Frank Halai’s breakaway try put New Zealand’s 19-14 up and Lote Raikabula finished things off with the last play of the game.England led 7-5 at the break against Samoa, then Perez and Afamasaga left them trailing 17-7. Turner grabbed his fifth try of the weekend to finish as England’s leading scorer but they couldn’t get over in the closing moments when well placed. “We’re going to Dubai which is one of our favourite competitions. There’s huge support there for England and we’re going to get on the plane tomorrow, refocus and evaluate what we’re doing, the things we didn’t get right and also the things we did get right. There were a lot of them and these are early days in the season.”England pressurised series champions New Zealand for long spells in the quarter final at Skilled Park, Cracknell smashing his way over after a series of direct attacks before Damudamu scored early in the second half with Marcus Watson’s conversions levelling the score at 14-14.last_img read more

Read More →

Rugby World – January 2014 edition contents

first_imgUncovered – England hooker Dylan HartleyTour Tale – A prop’s try-scoring problems THE autumn Tests may be over for another year, but the rugby keeps on coming. In the new issue of Rugby World we not only look back at the ups and downs of the November Internationals but also look ahead to the Heineken Cup double-headers, festive fixtures and the 2015 World Cup.Four star: Rugby World’s  January coversWe pick the England XV for RWC 2015 and highlight a few bolters who could breakthrough by then, debate who should play at fly-half for Scotland, get the low-down on Toby Faletau from those who know him best and meet Ireland’s Mr Modest, Mike McCarthy.In a feature sure to provoke debate, Stephen Jones picks his World XV, while Worcester full-back Chris Pennell explains how he copes with diabetes and opens up on the loss of his famous father, and we take a look at the pressure now placed on referees.Our nine-page Christmas Gift Guide is also sure to solve all your shopping dilemmas with plenty of ideas and our present to you is a FREE  2014 calendar featuring rugby icons. This is a list of contents – and you can find out where to buy your copy here or download our free magazine finder app here. Plus, if you have an iPad, download the digital edition here or find out about our android version here.SidelinesThe pick of this month’s Heineken Cup double-headers, Alex King looks ahead to his return to Wasps as a Northampton coach, our new photo competition, 30 Minutes with Saracens and England No 8 Billy Vunipola, Hotshot Hallam Amos and moreStar man: Mike Brown talks England’s autumnColumnistsMike Brown – England’s Man of the Series looks ahead to the next challengePaul Wallace – What made Ireland’s attack so lethal against the All Blacks?Andy Nicol – The former No 9 on why Scotland are lacking an edgeSpotlightsJames Hook – Wales’ Mr Versatile explains why he is happy with his lotTom Johnson – The back-rower talks England, Exeter and EuropeSean Lamont – The experienced Scot on his recent resurgenceRobbie Henshaw – Meet the Connacht back who has found his feet at Test level for IrelandFeaturesNew England – We’ve put our heads on the block! Here’s our XV for 2015 and bolters to look out for Big names: Billy Vunipola, Mike McCarthy, Toby Faletau and Sean Lamont all feature in our new issue LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Mike McCarthy – He’s modest about his ability, but there’s no mistaking the Ireland second-row’s desireToby Faletau – We ask some of the Wales No 8’s closest pals to give their verdict on the DragonScotland’s fly-half debate – The race is on to be Scotland’s No 10! We analyse the contendersFestive feast: plenty of present ideasChristmas gift guide – Stuck for ideas this Christmas? We’ve put together the ultimate guide, including gifts, books and DVDs, calendars and our big rugby quiz of the year!Referees – Should we be so critical of refs? We speak to the men with the hardest job on the pitchWorld XV – Many players have stood out in 2013, so we challenged Stephen Jones to pick his ultimate team. What will you make of it?Chris Pennell – The full-back is remaining positive after overcoming personal hurdlesAdvice sectionPro insight – The scientific scrum machine helping BathFitness – How to look after your body this winterPro playbook – Attacking options from the back rowMini rugby – How to play Table Football TouchRegularsRugby focus – All the news from the clubs, schools and women’s circuitsEssentials – The latest books and productslast_img read more

Read More →

Six Nations: Will we see Calcutta Cup cutting edge?

first_imgEngland’s Captain Chris Robshaw (Centre Right) lifts the Calcutta Cup after defeating Scotland during the 6 Nations International rugby union match between Scotland and England at Murrayfield Stadium in Edinburgh, Scotland on February 4, 2012. England won the game 13-6. AFP PHOTO / ADRIAN DENNIS (Photo credit should read ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images) What does this all add up to? Well, it would be a waste of eveyone’s time to say something as passé as “expect the unexpected” or that it will be “fascinating.” It is likely that the only thing stopping this match going the way of the bookies’ predictions is the actions of the players who have never featured in a match between the Auld Enemies.This is where England maintaining a side can help them, with young Jack Nowell instantly being told he can make amends for the few little slips he made against France. Luther Burrell gets the chance to try and latch onto Billy Vunipola’s offloads again. Jonny May will be aching to do something other than feeling a flash of face-pain and trudging off the dirt.Triumph: England won 13-6 last time at MurrayfieldOn the other side of things, Chris Fusaro – imagine an opponent more irritating than having a Cheeky Girls song stuck in your head for a fortnight – is playing his first ever game of international rugby ever, in the fixture every Scottish child dreams of playing in. On the bench, colossal lock Jonny Gray has replaced his brother so he can feature in his fist Calcutta Cup match. No pressure, kid. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Breakaway: Billy Vunipola burst against France, but will he do the same in a fixture that can be low on scores?By Alan DymockSPORTS PEOPLE often talk about the ‘control-ables’ – the things you can have an impact on. In modern rugby that means striving for a high tackle count, carry rate or being able to make that two-on-one pass when you are more worn out than a joke about Piers Morgan.Sometimes that is hard when so much around you is screaming, flashing and generally massaging Deep Heat into your brain. Being cool can be that much harder in the Six Nations. And then there is the Calcutta Cup. Then there is the Calcutta Cup in Edinburgh.Able to evade defenders: Scotland’s Stuart HoggYou can control and plan all you like, but history shows us that tries don’t come often and upsets are possible in the oldest international fixture of all. Jot down your best team and what they are capable of on paper, but Scotland versus England at Murrayfield can be a slow march into madness.England have only scored one try at Murrayfield since 2004. Scotland have only scored one try against England at Murrayfield since 2004. Scotland have dropped their captain from their squad of 23. England have kept the same team that lost in the closing stages in Paris last week. England are sticking with youth. Scotland are still experimenting. Scotland’s set-piece has a bit of the blancmange about it. England’s scrum is heavily fancied by pundits, but creaked against France. England arguably have much more cutting edge, but perhaps it is safer to say that both sides will be slugging away and that referee Jerome Garces may be forced to use his cards at some point. When tempers inevitably flair and the crowd gets on top of both sides and history becomes another weight to bear, it will be the squad able to have a moment of clarity and deliver (maybe only for one measly score) that will avenge last week’s heartbreak.If ever there was a weekend where the end result means more than style or statistics, it is Scotland versus England in Edinburgh in 2014.last_img read more

Read More →

Third Test: Five things we learnt v New Zealand – Wales

LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS After the competitiveness of the first two Tests came a sobering defeat in the third Test in Dunedin, so what did Wales take from the encounter? A man apart: Liam Williams gained the respect of the New Zealand crowdWhen all around him were losing their heads, and track of Israel Dagg’s and Ben Smith’s running lines, Williams was the most effective Welsh defender with seven tackles made, none missed. But even above his defensive effort was and is his attitude. As the All Blacks ran in their sixth try, Williams looks genuinely gutted. He simply doesn’t give up. He’s like one of those characters at the end of a horror film who requires killing at least five times – even then he’d revive and manage to ankle tap you. This tour may not have panned out as Williams had planned, but he’ll almost certainly have an opportunity to make amends next summer, when he returns.Dagg is backIt was wonderful to see Israel Dagg once again shredding the test arena. His performance in the third test, as with his Super Rugby form, was glorious. Few full backs in the world are able to hit the line like Dagg and his fidgety running lines caused the Welsh defence enormous problems. So many problems in fact that he carried the ball 252 metres on his own – a staggering amount in test rugby.Untouchable: Israel Dagg had a sensational game for the All Black offensivelyWith the immaculate Ben Smith on his wing, both sliced through Wales’ 13 channel causing Wales to miss six tackles between Rhys Patchell and Hallam Amos alone. It was a superb individual performance made even more special by the fact that many thought his test career was way behind him. As Brad Pitt uttered in the film Snatch “Do you like Daggs?” Yes we do, Brad. Yes, we do.So what’s happens next?There are many possible reasons why this three test tour of New Zealand has been so underwhelming for Welsh rugby. Organising such a difficult schedule in a Rugby World Cup year, leading to player fatigue, being just one. But it would be myopic to blame Welsh rugby’s inability to beat New Zealand on the circumstances of the past 12 months. The downward spiral of Welsh success against the All Blacks is alarming and extends way beyond the past season. Of course, Wales haven’t beaten them for over sixty years, so why should we expect to beat them now? Nightmare: Wales saved the worst till last as they were beaten 46-6 in Dunedin A big step backwardsIt is painfully ironic that Wales should be blown away, by 46 -6, in the windless environs of the Forsyth Barr Stadium. A scoreline and performance which represented a serious step backwards from the opening two tests – where Wales were at least competitive for 50 minutes. It was a step backwards even beyond the last fortnight, back to the early 1990’s, when Wales were regularly pumped by 40 plus points. There were few positives. The Welsh lineout ran at 100% for the first time on this tour, with Sam Warburton and Taulupe Faletau winning plenty of clean ball from the tail. The ever lively Rhys Webb and resolute Liam Williams were the rare individual highlights. But that’s where the positives end.Tough day at the office: Alun Wyn Jones looks on as the floodgates openedWales completed just 65% of their tackles, as low as I can remember under Shaun Edwards. Despite one glorious scrum on the Welsh line, this aspect of the set piece was unreliable and regularly left Faletau reaching deep into the scrum like a vet birthing a calf – the ball often coming out even messier than the said calf. Just three line breaks meant that Wales were forced into making hard yards and limited them to just 239 yards carried – nowhere near enough to score the necessary five tries required to cope with the AB’s. This was definitely a game too far for the players and supporters alike.The defensive struggleWales completed just 65% of their tackles in the third test. Way below the 90% expected at test level. But the drop in percentage is to some degree understandable. Wales’ impressive defensive completions of the past eight seasons have largely come in the Six Nations where the running lines are more predictable, the passing is shorter and the game is narrower. That is not the case in New Zealand, as Wales have found out. You can’t simply set your feet against an All Black, brace your shoulders and absorb a massive impact.Tormenter: Beauden Barrett showed Wales a clean pair of heels for two triesIf you set your feet against triple threat players, who can step, pass and kick, you’ll get burned. It happened regularly in the third test with Israel Dagg and Ben Smith gliding around the Welsh twelve and thirteen channel – Israel Dagg carried the ball further than the entire Welsh team. Even the almost impenetrable Jonathan Davies struggled – missing five tackles for the second week in a row. Much has been made of Wales’ need to reform their attack against the All Blacks’ but the defensive shift is equally as urgent.Liam Williams. Awesome, again.Even amongst a hugely disappointing Welsh performance, Liam Williams didn’t disappoint. Steve Hansen said of the Welsh team that many of them appeared to all ready be on the plane home during the game in Dunedin, Williams wasn’t, and he left his mark on the grass as he has done on all three kiwi pitches. With little opportunity to impressive going forward, he made every opportunity to impressive when going backwards with as fine a defensive performance as you’ll see from a wing. Lagging behind: Try as they might, Wales just can’t seem to close the gap on New ZealandWell, ‘now’ is very different to the amateur days, where the Kiwis were ‘less amateur’ than Wales, shall we say. That is not the case presently. This is a level playing field and Wales is a fully professional, fully funded tier one rugby nation, which has over the last decade been unable to consistently compete with New Zealand. We’re not even talking about beating the All Blacks, we’re talking about merely competing with them and being within one score in the last ten minutes of the game. This wasn’t even a full strength All Blacks, this was the AB’s very much in rebuild mode. Something has to change, it’s obvious for all to see. read more

Read More →

Visually impaired rugby hits the world stage in Japan

first_img Foothold: Si Ledwith carries against the ‘Blind Blacks’ in 2017, the series that launched VI rugby (QBE) Visually impaired rugby joins the World Cup party as England face Japan in Kumagaya LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Visually impaired rugby hits the world stage in JapanFancy a bit of rugby? Then close your eyes and picture this: the smell of freshly cut grass; the roar of the crowd; running full pelt down the field; the touchline almost in reach; your winger just to your right; the heavy footsteps of the opposing defender bearing down on you.Now, open just one eye slightly, squint tightly, and try your best to catch that ball hurtling towards you while avoiding that other defender coming at you headlong even faster!That may give you an inkling of an idea as to what teams playing visually impaired rugby face each time they take to the field. And on Monday, visually impaired (VI) rugby will hit the world stage as part of the Rugby World Cup in Japan.In recent years, The Change Foundation (TCF) in the UK, with its visually impaired coaches and players, has developed VI rugby as a seven-a-side touch version, played with an adapted ball that makes a noise to help players locate it when it’s moving.In partnership with the Wasps Legends Charitable Foundation, TCF established the first VI rugby teams in England and launched the game with a series between the ‘Blind Lions’ and the ‘Blind Blacks’ in New Zealand during the 2017 British & Irish Lions tour.On 14 October, which is a National Holiday of Sport and Health, the Visually Impaired Rugby Festival will feature a three-match series between England and Japan at Kumagaya Stadium.Ready to go: the England VI team. Top (from left): Si Ledwith, Jack Pearce, Dan Linekar (coach), Ryan Jones, Christopher Styles. Bottom: Gareth Davies, Alex Bassan (head coach), Mathew Lancett (TCF)The Change Foundation will also be showcasing VI rugby as part of the Festival of Rugby that is running throughout the World Cup. The finale is a match between a combined Japan and England Visually Impaired team and a Wasps Legends team captained by former England and Lions lock Simon Shaw and including ex-France flanker Serge Betsen.“I’m delighted to be able to support this brilliant cause by putting the boots on in Japan,” Shaw says. “The Wasps Legends Charitable Foundation have done a great job supporting the development of this new form of the game. It’s brilliant that the rugby family is reaching out to players who up to now thought they could never play our great game.”The event will run from 11am to 3pm, is free to attend and everyone is welcome.The England VI team includes a Welshman, Gareth Davies, who was diagnosed in his teens with retinitis pigmentosa, a genetic condition that causes tunnel vision. He now has just 10% vision in his left eye. “I was born in Wiltshire but my dad Dwyfor is a Welsh speaker from Ystalyfera and my late mum was from Clydach and I’ve lived in Wales for more than 20 years,” he told the BBC last year.center_img “My kids Nia and Lloyd take the mickey out of me for being born in England, but I think they’re really proud of me. I would have loved to play for Wales if they had a team.”Also in the team is Si Ledwith, who was instrumental in creating the sport, as Rugby World reported two years ago. He told us then: “Our overall goal was to make the game look and feel as much like mainstream rugby as possible whilst still being accessible. So we have scrums and lineouts but they’re uncontested. We still create the patterns and scenarios of rugby but take away some of the danger.“We’ve not reinvented the wheel. It’s based around rugby sevens, two-handed touch, but we’ve developed a ball that has some sound, both in hand when running and in the air when passed. We simply filled it with a thousand ball bearings so that it rattles.”Blind ambition: New Zealand’s Cory Herberley in action. Now VI rugby will be played in Japan (QBE)Ledwith hadn’t been allowed to play rugby at school on account of his visual impairment – he was born blind in his left eye and very short-sighted in his right. His sight was restricted still further by an accident on the cricket field in 2015, the ball hitting him in the eye and causing a brain haemorrhage that rendered him totally blind for two weeks.“Fortunately the blood drained away but I can’t see anywhere near what I used to. I’m one of the lowest-sighted in the team and I was on the left wing because I can only see out of my right eye. You might have one of the tunnel-vision guys slightly wider so he can look across the line and communicate to those who aren’t seeing the line as well. It’s an interesting dynamic and the referee is key because he’s kind of a commentator.”VI rugby ambassadors Andy Robinson and Ian McKinley have helped prepare the team for Japan. Robinson’s father was blind and had matches audio described while McKinley lost an eye following injury in 2011 but went on to play for Benetton and Italy. McKinley plans to take the field at TCF’s showcase event in 2020, the VI Rugby Six Nations demonstration event.Figurehead: Ian McKinley, playing for Italy against Ireland in August, is a VI rugby ambassador (Getty)Related content: Ardie Savea wears goggles against CanadaThroughout next year, TCF will work with each of the Six Nations teams to develop the sport in their countries. In England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, TCF will work with the home unions to select a ‘Blind Lions’ team to travel to South Africa to play the ‘Blind Boks’ during the 2021 British & Irish Lions tour.Keep track of all the news from Japan via our Rugby World Cup home page. Follow Rugby World magazine on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.Grand setting: Kumagaya Stadium staged three games at RWC 2019 and will now feature VI rugby (Getty)last_img read more

Read More →

Dragons v Scarlets live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_img Dragons v Scarlets live stream: How to watch the Pro14 match online from anywhereIt could be oh-so sweet for Glenn Delaney’s Scarlets outfit if everything falls into place in the Guinness Pro14 this weekend. But it’s no easy feat when they meet the Dragons at 5.15pm on Saturday.The Scarlets need to win well and get a big favour from Connacht v Munster the very next day. As it stands, the Welsh side are four points behind Munster in Conference B and so need results to fall in their favour to make the knock-outs. In order to burst into the semi-finals they will have to snaffle all five points against the Dragons and hope Munster get nothing at all from their final regular-season tie.But the last time these two sides faced off, the Scarlets were beaten 22-20 – again, in Newport – on 21 December.In fact you have to hark back to 30 December 2011 for the last big Scarlets win at Rodney Parade. The Scarlets faithful will remember a snapped Sam Davies drop-goal in dead time handing the Dragons a 22-20 win in Newport on 21 December – a painful callback to the dramatic 34-32 triumph the Dragons also enjoyed in April, for Judgement Day.If the Scarlets are to pull it off, they need everyone firing.Dragons: Will Talbot-Davies; Jared Rosser, Adam Warren, Nick Tompkins, Ashton Hewitt; Sam Davies, Rhodri Williams (captain); Josh Reynolds, Elliot Dee, Chris Coleman, Max Williams, Matthew Screech, Aaron Wainwright, Taine Basham, Harrison Keddie.Replacements: Ellis Shipp, Conor Maguire, Leon Brown, Joe Maksymiw, Huw Taylor, Luke Baldwin, Arwel Robson, Jack Dixon.Scarlets: Angus O’Brien; Johnny McNicholl, Steff Hughes, Johnny Williams, Steff Evans; Dan Jones, Kieran Hardy; Wyn Jones, Ken Owens (captain), Samson Lee, Jake Ball, Lewis Rawlins, Ed Kennedy, James Davies, Sione Kalamafoni.Replacements: Ryan Elias, Phil Price, Javan Sebastian, Josh Helps, Josh Macleod, Dane Blacker, Paul Asquith, Tom Rogers.If you want to see if the Scarlets can break their hoodoo, here are your streaming options…How to watch Dragons v Scarlets from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Pro14 coverage, like Dragons v Scarlets, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Pro14 live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free – perfect timing to watch the end of the Pro14 season – or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPNDragons v Scarlets live stream: How to watch from the UKDragons v Scarlets, which kicks off at 5.15pm on Saturday, will be shown live on Premier Sports 1 in the UK. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Breakaway: Gareth Davies for the Scarlets earlier in the season (Inpho) Premier Sports show every Guinness Pro14 match live in the UK. If you have a Sky or Virgin Media contract, you can add Premier Sports to your package from £9.99 a month.Or subscribe to Premier Player so you can stream matches online from £9.99 a month or £99 for 12 months, which would include the 2020-21 Pro14 season too. That is due to start on 3 October.See Premier Sports offersIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when there’s a particular match you want to watch, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Dragons v Scarlets live stream: How to watch from IrelandIn Ireland, eir Sport show every Pro14 match live, including Dragons v Scarlets (kick-off 5.15pm eir Sport 2), and if you sign up for eir broadband you can watch eir Sport for free via the eir TV app and online player.Find out more about the eir broadband deals here.Or you can sign up for eir TV and broadband packages, which include eir Sport, from €39.98 a month.If you have Sky TV in Ireland but not eir broadband, you can add eir Sport to your package for €19.99 a month for three months (€29.99 after that) or for €240 for the year – here are the details of the Sky-eir package.Dragons v Scarlets live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to Dragons v Scarlets from New Zealand, the match kicks off at 4.15am on Sunday, Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 September 2020 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offerDragons v Scarlets live stream: How to watch from South AfricaSuperSport came on board as a Pro14 broadcast partner when South African franchises Cheetahs and Kings joined the competition in 2017.They primarily show matches involving those teams but are also showing Team A v Team B kicks off at 6.15pm on SuperSport One.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from EasyView, with access to Blitz, to Premium, which includes all ten sports channels.We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing. center_img Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Can the Scarlets break their Rodney Parade hoodoo and make the play-offs?last_img read more

Read More →

Remembering the last Lions home game

first_img TAGS: Highlight We take you back to 2005 with an oral history of the 25-all draw between the British & Irish Lions and Argentina, played out in Cardiff before the tour to New Zealand A rare sighting of Lions and Pumas in Cardiff, 2005 (Getty Images) Remembering the last Lions home gameIn May 2005, the British & Irish Lions took to the Principality Stadium, then known as the Millennium Stadium, to take on Argentina. It was a rare warm-up match played on home soil – an event to kick off a tour like no other in New Zealand. What unfolded was later described as “a bit of a wake-up call” as a thoroughly depleted Pumas side took their much-vaunted hosts to the brink of chastening defeat, with Jonny Wilkinson – playing his first Test rugby since he kicked England to Rugby World Cup glory in 2003 – saving Lions blushes with an injury-time penalty to make it 25-25. Their sojourn to the Land of the Long White Cloud has passed into folklore. Fans today still slam head coach Clive Woodward’s plan to take a “top heavy back-up staff” and over 50 players with them on the way to a Blackwash of three Test losses against New Zealand. However, we’re only interested in one game, right at the start of all that. Sir Clive Woodward assesses his Lions squad before game one, 2005 (Getty Images)As the class of 2021 prepare for a Lions home game for the first time since 2005 when they take on Japan in Edinburgh on 26 June, we walk down the boulevard of broken memories to offer new perspectives on a moment in rugby history some will have purposely suppressed. After all, many from Argentina may see things a little differently… From the day the Lions squad was named on 11 April (initially with 20 English, 11 Irish, ten Welsh, three Scots and no J. Wilkinson – but hey, things change fast) to departing for New Zealand on 25 May, plenty happened. Here we hear from a cast of Lions players and staff, some Pumas and a match referee who all played their part and have different emotional souvenirs from the time. THE BUILD-UPMichael Owen, Lions No 8 (captain): “When you’re playing I think it’s quite hard to grasp what’s happening sometimes, because it’s like ‘the next thing’ all the time. “Obviously the Lions is particularly special, but you finish the season, you have time to prepare, you get into the Lions camp and then you get on with it. At the time it’s difficult to get appreciation for what it is, the achievement. But it was definitely something special.“I don’t remember the moment where I was told that I was being captain for that game, which is quite strange as I can normally remember those sorts of details quite well!”Argentina captain Felipe Contepomi with Michael Owen (Getty Images)Ollie Smith, Lions centre: “They named the Lions tour squad and I remember the dates, because it was horrendous that week. They named the group on Monday the 11th of April, and my dad dropped dead of a heart attack on Wednesday the 14th of April. “I’d had a good career at that point – I’d played well the last year to 18 months, while I’d only had a few caps for England at the time. I was probably one of the better centres in Europe at the time – in the British Isles, certainly – on form. But being named for the Lions was a big surprise as I hadn’t really played that much for England.“I’d played well against Brian O’Driscoll and Gordon D’Arcy for Leicester against Leinster and I think O’Driscoll probably helped me get on that tour, he maybe put a good word towards Clive because he was a big part of that tour, being captain.“So I was going to tour and one part of me is going, “Oh my god, my dad is a typical father figure and was so important to my career and very suddenly he is not here any more.” I’m now in a Lions camp, trying to motivate myself. It was a huge emotional roller coaster.“Playing for the Lions was amazing, but the person I wanted there the most just vanished out of my world, six weeks ago. I was dealing with my mum grieving, my sister grieving, and in hindsight I probably should have pulled out the tour. But you don’t pull out of Lions tours, I just couldn’t, you don’t know when you’ll get another chance.”Chris Cusiter, Lions replacement scrum-half: “That first week I barely remember the team announcement. I remember feeling equal parts excited to wear the famous red jersey for the first time and terrified that something would happen and I wouldn’t make it onto the plane to New Zealand.“The prep was fun, training at the Vale of Glamorgan. The build-up I remember being quite relaxed, not too much pressure. Mainly basic organisation.”Midweek coach Ian McGeechan with the Lions (Getty Images)Smith: “The Vale had a great set-up out the back. We also got to a local club – I remember training somewhere in that valley. I don’t know the area that well, you know what it’s like when you’re in camp. You get stuck on a bus, driven somewhere, get off and train!”Owen: “The thing for me that really sticks out is that everything was in Wales (for that game). We trained, bizarrely, in the place where I trained for Pontypridd U11, the U15s and through to the Pontypridd senior team. It was a place now called University of South Wales Playing Fields. “I sat in the same seat that I sat then, when I was an U11 schoolboy, so that was a big memory for me, for the week. It was amazing. In terms of the preparation, I remember little bits of the stuff we were trying to do, but on the whole of that Lions tour I felt like we never really nailed the rugby side of things.”Craig White, Lions S&C: “I remember players were tired and I was amazed by the sheer size of the playing and coaching group. It was a huge operation.“I also remember doing a team-building exercise where we split into teams of four and we had to paint an image given to us (it was a piece of a jigsaw). When we had finished each piece, it was put together without us knowing and then the completed painting, as each piece fit together, was unleashed. It was a Lions logo/collage with a lion. It was quite cool and everyone had their picture taken in front of it.“Whilst it was quite cool I couldn’t help thinking that it would have been cheaper and more of a bonding experience to have a piss-up!“I don’t really remember anything about the training week apart from feeling like we were miles off the pace.”Cusiter: “We also went to the FA Cup final between Arsenal and Man United. We met players like Rio Ferdinand at the hotel, etc.”Gavin Scott, Lions analyst: “Was it the FA Cup final? We certainly went to a football match!”Referee Stuart Dickinson looks after Waratahs v Reds, 2005 (Getty Images)Stuart Dickinson, referee: “I’d done the Waratahs versus the Reds in Super Rugby on 6 May, and then the British & Irish Lions on the 23rd. So I was there ten days before. Then on the 28th I was in charge of England versus the Barbarians at Twickenham.“The groundskeeper who looked after the Millennium (at the time) later moved to Australia. I had done a number of games there and built a good relationship with him. I had gone along to the ground that week and they were playing the FA Cup final. He said to me, ‘You might want to come to the game.’ I said ‘Yeah, absolutely’, and he said, ‘Well, I’ll get you a ticket.’“It was really interesting. That’s the first and only game with Premier League teams I’ve ever seen and it was the FA Cup final. All the blokes I know that know soccer they go, ‘You’re kidding, aren’t you?!’”Scott: “As the analyst I was heavily involved with both the coaching teams. It was a big group of coaches, famously split into two groups (midweek and Test sides). “That whole week there was lots of selection chat going on and talking about the game – Woodward sort of set out his vision for how it might go, his potential selections as the tour grew. The sad thing was when Iain Balshaw turned up injured, he just didn’t quite make it, and the interesting thing was seeing that large coaching group pick who the next guy was.“For me it was great memories of a dynamic group of people. “You saw the dynamics and the coaches were very fair. My recollection is really that Woody (Woodward) almost let them lead on the player a coach thought should be in, saying for instance, ‘What’s he like, this player who plays for you?” They’d each speak about them. “And at that level, it’s always based on the squad. That’s the thing players may forget. A single player may say ‘it’s me versus him and I’m better’. Whereas often a decision is more around covering more than one thing.” Smith: “They named the group quite early in the week and we got split up, so it was like, right, ‘You 22 to 23 are going to be the focus of this Argentinian game’. So you’re planning for a six-week tour of New Zealand and games to come but also for the short term, you’re going to play against Argentina at the end of the week. “We would have started to look at plays and look at things that hopefully we’re gonna carry forward into the tour, and starting to get familiar. Some guys knew each other better than others, having played in international teams together or played against each other a lot. I was pretty new to it. I was rooming with Ronan O’Gara that week, which was interesting.”Bernardo Stortoni had a stint with Bristol (Getty Images)Bernardo Stortoni, Argentina full-back: “I was in Biarritz visiting a friend when the union called me to tell me we would play the Lions. I was walking through town and I was very excited. It was an incredible experience. “A lot of players were playing in the finals in France (so couldn’t represent Argentina).“We met nine days before the Test match and the coaches told us to enjoy the game and the moment. We were analysing player by player since the Lions had not played together. It was difficult to analyse.”Mariano Sambucetti, Argentina lock: “We had several injuries and I think the biggest factor was that French clubs were not releasing our players. Argentina were quite heavy on the amount of players playing in France then. “As soon as you got the call-up, you said, ‘Oh my god, what an opportunity this is!’ It doesn’t come very often. Any call-up where your country is something special, but then this type of game. It’s not something very common, especially being from Argentina. “We arrived (in Wales), we started looking at the team and we had several that haven’t played (for Argentina), several that are coming through. I mean, everyone knows if you’re in the original line-up normally or not. And also we had several guys, like Federico Mendez for example, who basically came out of retirement to play.“It was one of those where there were a lot of old heads. These guys like Lisandro Arbizu, Mendez, then there were great players like Felipe (Contepomi), Jose Nunez Piossek, and some younger ones or others who were in contention.“During the week we trained very tough. And one key factor was that Les Cusworth (former Leicester and England ten) was helping us. He had a very good insight into the Lions players. Argentina had an important twist on its professionalism in their approach, preparing for games around that time. That’s where 2007’s great World Cup comes from. It’s also safe to say that there was a big merger of upcoming players and very, very experienced natural leaders. “During the week, I’ll be honest with you, there was basically fear. Fear of embarrassment. The old heads like Mendez, Reggiardo and Ledesma have a lot on the line with their reputation. These guys set the tone of taking it like an amateur spirit of saying, ‘Let’s go in and surprise everyone. You know we’ve got nothing to lose. Let’s put pressure on them.’“The one key moment I thought in the week was when Les presented this whole analysis, he said ‘Okay, this is who they are,’ showing all their attributes, all the players, how good they were, etc, etc. Then we said, ‘Okay, that’s as far as we respect them. Right now, from where we leave this meeting room, this is over. Now it’s on us’.” Jonny Wilkinson’s international return created a buzz (Getty Images)Scott: “Guys like (Sambucetti) who played in the Premiership, we obviously knew a number of the Argentina players anyway, but on a tour like that there’s usually a ‘we need to concentrate on ourselves first’ attitude. “On a Lions tour, my recollection was, you’re also thinking, ‘This is game one… this team might also play game three. The other team might play game two. What is it?’ It’s all the basics of what our lineout calls are going to be, and all that stuff that happens at a rugby club in August over weeks has to be done in a couple of days on a Lions tour. “So there was a much bigger concentration on the Lions development side of things, whereas Argentina would be a strong side regardless, just because of the attitude they bring. They are such a big-game team, that’s always why they do so well at World Cups. “Looking at that squad again, that was one that haunted us for years in Scotland. Ledesma and some of the guys that came through went all the way to 2011. So while there were guys who didn’t play so much, they also had a team that was going to be something.” THE WAY TO THE GROUND AND THE WARM-UPSmith: “I remember being very nervous – I always got nervous before games, whether I was playing U15s or for the British & Irish Lions. The anxiety was kind of ‘make sure you don’t let yourself down, make sure you do your bits well’, but that would have been no different to whoever was playing the game. “I just remember running out in that red, at the Millennium Stadium… with crowds! Not a huge, huge crowd but a good crowd. I think it was a decent crowd for it.”Tour captain Brian O’Driscoll, Matt Dawson and other Lions in the stand (Inpho)Dickinson: “The atmosphere in the ground was just fantastic. I remember they said we’re going to start in an hour and then we got 15 minutes (more) because of the number of people that have turned up late and selling extra tickets… So that built the atmosphere.“I think there was the whole theatre of that, of the Lions people perhaps thinking it would go to script or that this would be a 100-nil or training run…” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sambucetti: “One funny story was when we were on the bus as it comes out of the Hilton. The police (escort) comes in front of us but we couldn’t move as there were so many people there and the whole thing was dyed in red.“I see all those fans and I think ‘…holy s**t…’. And then they see that it’s Argentina and now I’m thinking ‘Oh my god, they’re gonna kill us!’ And then they start chanting ‘AR-GEN-TINA! AR-GEN-TINA!’ The whole tone was fantastic. Phenomenal. “And then from the back seat of the bus, we hear Federico Mendez say, ‘Did you boys bring an extra bag? Because we’re going to need it for all the points we are going to take here!’“We thought we were going to be in trouble!”Geordan Murphy, Lions full-back: “I remember working with Dave Alred (kicking coach) before the game, in the warm-up. I remember him coming over and saying ‘Why don’t you try this?’ and giving me some sort of slight adjustments to my kicking and I was thinking, ‘oh, that’s quite unusual to be given something like that so close to the game’.”Owen: “Everyone was really excited and looking forward to the game and I can remember the warm-up and stuff. I remember speaking to the coach. It just felt like one of those games, it was just really bitty.”Stortoni: “I remember it was a very complete (Lions) team, with many English world champions. And the backs were terribly good players, excellent.”The Lions line-up (Getty Images)Owen: “It’s just my recollection but it was like we thought we’d be okay and we’d just come for a game and a useful run-out. But it didn’t feel like we really prepared that intensely and we weren’t that clear on how we’re going to play. That was my memory of it. “With the lineouts and stuff we just weren’t that prepared and there’s disappointment there because we had a really good team, and we didn’t really do ourselves justice on the day. And Argentina, I think they really were still fighting for recognition.”Related: The British & Irish Lions and Music THE GAMEStortoni: “I think we surprised them with our press and tackle. They were not expecting it. We were able to score points fast.”Scott: “I remember it being tough and It felt like we were thrown together a bit, which is what the team is (at the start of) a Lions tour. I remember we went down early to a try (for Piossek) and never quite recovered.“And it was like this for two or three games, where there was some really, really good stuff but there’s a lot of handling errors and mistakes.”Some of the savage defence from Argentina (Getty Images)Dickinson: “You knew to expect that competitiveness where the Argentinians really took it to them. Alright, (as a ref) you never try and pan out something to say ‘I think this is gonna happen’, but you’re trying to prepare for everything and you just knew there was going to be some tight things here where they’re going to have a go at them at scrum time and then they’ve got to take them on because that’s the Latin way. You know they want to be physical. “They pressured them. Poor Gareth Cooper (Lions nine) kept getting caught a few times and he was getting frustrated. I don’t ever remember saying it to him, but a journalist, one of the Irish guys, came up to me afterwards and said I’d provided a funny moment for the press box. “I asked what was that and he relayed something on Cooper sort of whinging and saying ‘They’re offside’ and I said ‘No, if you just stop taking a step when you get the ball and get rid of it early, you might not get caught.’ It wasn’t meant to be demeaning to Gareth, just get on with the game, because he was under pressure.”Cusiter: “I don’t know if you’ve ever played with any Argentinians, but they try harder than anybody else. Especially with someone like the Lions, they were just going absolutely crazy. You’ll never see anybody try as hard as that. “Then they got ahead and it was just like, ‘Oh s**t, the Lions are going to lose their first game to Argentina!’”Dickinson: “The Pumas were just a step ahead, mentally.“At the end of the day they were very much up for the contest and I think that just sort of smacked the Lions between the eyes. And by the time it went whack, whack, whack, ‘Oh, where are we, jeez we’re 19-16 down, we better pull the finger out.’ That was part of the deal, you know these guys had really come to play.”Just six minutes into the game, Argentina score a try through Piossek. With a harried Cooper spilling ball, the Pumas worked the turnover through scattered medics and players. Felipe Contepomi sliced past the Lions front five and worked the ball to the wing just in time. Sambucetti: “I cannot forget that try.“Jose is like a pickpocket – he always finds a way of getting in with crowded places and coming out with something. I was at a ruck, there was a turnover and pass-pass, and Jose was going for the line. I couldn’t believe it. It was just a message that we could do it.”Just after quarter of an hour, the Lions get on the board with a try from Ollie Smith. With the Lions lineout securing ball, it’s worked to Wilkinson, who draws a few defenders, pushes his arms through and offloads to Smith on his shoulder, with the Leicester centre powering to the line, diving between two converging defenders.Smith: “Like any decent centre, if someone takes the ball to the line you try to run lines. And then Jonny Wilkinson, he wasn’t a bad fly-half in fairness…”Cusiter: “I’d never seen somebody who could pass the ball like Jonny Wilkinson before. It was just unbelievable, throwing absolute lasers in training.”Scott: There were these bits, like when Jonny put Ollie away, and I see that with things like in the Bay of Plenty game that was next that was the same: there was lots of stilted stuff, and there was some absolute genius play that made you go ‘Wow, this is what we’re capable of’.”Ollie Smith goes over as Stortoni catches his boot (Getty Images)Smith: “He got his arms free and popped it to me and then it was just kind of a foot race to the line. The full-back was across one way and the blind winger was doing his job that well and was probably where the full-back should have been at the time. And, yeah, foot down. I did have a turn of pace before my knee went! “I got to the line, I remember diving over between the two of them and I lost my boot! It was probably a good bit of advertising for Puma then.“The thing is, I’d been playing with Darryl Gibson and he was great at taking the ball to the line – he was a strong, hard bastard in fairness – and would often get half the shoulder and get his arms free. We had an amazing, amazing team at Leicester at the time so if you get your arms free and offload to someone, you’re guaranteed to score a try.”But Argentina kept coming and with a vicious defence and with their powerful set-piece they wrestled the advantage. But they had something else up their sleeve: the sublime kicking of Federico Todeschini. The scrum pressure did not let up either.Sambucetti: “it’s something intrinsic and it just grows and grows on the park – it was one of those days (for Todeschini). And also as soon as you smell blood and you’re thinking, ‘It’s blood from the Lions’, it’s hard not to get excited.”Cusiter: “I remember coming on with about 20 minutes ago and being absolutely terrified but also excited. Obviously it was at the Millennium Stadium where I’d got my first Scotland cap, and this was gonna be my first game for the Lions.“I remember the first pass I made was an absolute zinger and the first few passes actually were some of the best passes I’ve ever made, so I kind of settled me down and I just really enjoyed it. I made a half-break at one point, made a couple of good tackles… Yeah I just absolutely loved it, it was incredible. “And then I remember obviously getting through to injury time.” Sambucetti: “Tell the referee I still don’t forgive him – he went for eight minutes too long!”Dickinson: “You can go back and tell him it’s just the way it is, it’s not just 80 minutes right so when that when the clock comes up, you’ve got to wait for the particular break and all that sort of stuff, it can feel like 100 hours for the poor bastards!”Cusiter: “Somebody dropped the ball – Gordon D’Arcy I think (it was) – and somehow we got another shot and we got the penalty. Obviously Jonny kicked it with the last kick of the game for us to draw.”Wilkinson kicks a penalty to make it 25-25 (Getty Images)Stortoni: “I grabbed that ball and kicked it into the stand, very angry from having (not won). Ha, ha, I regret that. But I’m sure some Welsh fan must have saved the ball!”Sambucetti: “When he (the referee) goes penalty, first it was us asking ‘Is it finished, is it finished, is it finished?’ When it was a penalty, we thought okay. My only fear was that he didn’t continue after that, and I thought,’ Okay, well, we’ll take the draw, but this isn’t fair.’ “But you’ll look back on a career and it’s about those unique moments. We always talk about spirit, teamwork, and you can go on and on about it but it’s those times where everything just clicks and aligns and you go in there as the underdog and it happens on a world stage with everyone watching it… Personally for me it’s my best rugby memory.”The scoreboard shows the Argentina players celebrating after the draw (Getty Images)Smith: “With not much time on the clock, it’s quite hard to get to the end against a team that’s willing to chase everything down and pounce on every opportunity. That’s what they did for the majority of the game, they lived off our silly little mistakes, our silly knock-ons where we’re probably losing shape and overthinking things.“God knows how we got to draw at the end but Jonny kicks it and thankfully we walked away with the draw at the end. We got bad press for it but if you said in that press conference ‘I reckon in two years time this group (Argentina) plus a few others will finish third in the next World Cup,’ you’d agree that you could see that.”THE IMMEDIATE AFTERMATHStortoni: I remember the walk to the hotel from the Millennium. We were walking, not with the bus. We stopped and talked with the British and Irish fans.”Sambucetti: “That’s true, that’s true. “It was a big contrast with the situation from going from the hotel to the field. We certainly didn’t expect to come back with a draw, that felt like a win. On the way back we walked to the hotel and everyone was… Well, you know how it gets after a match! When you see that you just slip the tie off and go into town with them. “It got very friendly, let’s say!”A Lions fan looks on as his team struggle to a draw (Getty Images)Cusiter: “There was relief not to be coming off with a defeat but for me I was just buzzing, so full of adrenaline, so excited. I was so chuffed with how I’d played, chuffed that I was now a British & Irish Lion, chuffed that I wasn’t injured, chuffed that we’re leaving for New Zealand a couple of days after.“I know a lot of people have negative memories of that tour. But I loved every second, I loved that first game, loved the tour, loved the midweeks, and yeah fond memories of all of it.”Smith: “I can remember just everyone being really, genuinely decent blokes.“They’re down-to-earth guys and they’d be the sort of person who would take the posts in or help you move a sofa if you needed help. Rugby’s got very few idiots and the ones that are get found out unless they’re very, very talented and they can piss off out the game.”Owen: “Reflecting back on it, we’ve been fortunate that it was given Test status after the event. It’s phenomenal for us. it’s actually quite a good concept (a Lions home game), isn’t it, and it’s brilliant for this year with one game at home before you leave.” Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Read More →

House of Deputies president, vice president issue letter on gun…

first_img March 1, 2013 at 5:03 pm I thought I was a pretty knowledgeable person. Color me embarrassed! I had no idea that gun trafficking was not a federal crime. It needs to be, along with reasonable and executable regulations for gun shows. (Perhaps a check-in process that includes a criminal background check.)What really stumps me is the mental health issue. How do we find the people who need help and how do we safely go about helping them? You always wonder what price you will pay for trying to do the right thing. Posted Mar 1, 2013 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments are closed. Advocacy Peace & Justice, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group March 1, 2013 at 7:17 pm I don’t make a habit of commenting on comments but I’ll make an exception to ask all who read the letter from the President and Vice President of the House of Deputies to read it very carefully. They have reaffirmed General Convention’s “longstanding commitment to adequate funding for mental health services” as well as calling for serious restrictions on sale, use and ownership of guns and ammunition. Seems pretty well=balanced and reasonable to me. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (11) Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Theron Patrick says: March 1, 2013 at 6:35 pm I truly regret that the Episcopal Church leadership has adopted the view that gun control is the answer to the violence in this country. While any of the individuals who compose the leadership may of course adopt that political view, to state that it is the view of the entire membership of the Church, including me, is wrong.Theron Patrick Rev. Dr. John W. Smith; says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA President of the House of Deputies March 1, 2013 at 7:39 pm “as well as calling for serious restrictions on sale, use and ownership of guns and ammunition. Seems pretty well balanced and reasonable to me.” I don’t consider this well balanced. If you do, that is your right. What I objected to and find offensive was the implication that I held the same view. Fr. Jay Pierce says: Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Theron Patrick says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI March 2, 2013 at 12:17 am While Fr. Pierce makes some sound points, he seems reluctant to recognize that neither the criminal, the chronically mentally ill nor the unbalanced personality has ever killed so many so quickly with a machete or a tomahawk as have those armed with assault weapons, whether Glocks with 33 cartridge magazines or Bushmasters designed for the battlefield. Making such firearms even a bit more difficult for any civilian to purchase, own or use is worth the time and energy I’m able to spend encouraging my elected officials to attempt to accomplish. Tags Gun Violence, Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Frank Bergen says: Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA March 1, 2013 at 6:40 pm There are many Federal Gun laws. So what is commonly called interstate gun trafficking is tightly regulated and non compliance is a Federal Offense.Theron Patrick Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Frank Bergen says: Theron Patrick says: Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA March 1, 2013 at 10:19 pm The authors of this letter have fallen into the dreamland position that the solution to violence in America is to make ownership of guns more difficult by way of additional laws at the federal level. How sad that we believe we are contributing to the solution of this horrendous problem by more rules, and not by addressing the causes of the problem: poverty, mental health issues, and failure of the family system within portions of our population. The vast majority of cases quoted in support of the proposals fail to demonstrate that the proposed legislation would have prevented a single episode of horror. Do we really believe we are accomplishing our goal, or are we simply creating a delusion for the calming of our emotions? We do need to do something! But of the proposals that have surfaced of late, more regulations will not collect the guns of the criminals nor identify the sad and terrifying mind gone far, far beyond reason or control. Our Lord reminded us that the poor will always be with us. We tend to believe his direction was toward the economically / politically poor, but I’ve believed for many years it includes the poor of preparation: the dull, the unbalanced personality and certainly the chronically mentally ill. And, don’t forget the criminal and politically motivated among us! The letter of which we are to acknowledge and applaud is worthless in the solution of the complex problems pressing us. Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN March 2, 2013 at 6:44 pm I write as a “hybrid Episcopalian,” snatched from the jaws of ennui by liturgy, lectionary, and pew aerobics, and now puzzled by the writer’s response to the House of Deputies statement on gun control. Perhaps I loll in la-la land, but that statement is not intended as dogma, since the national Episcopal Church does not speak for its membership, but to it. Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Dan B. Odenweller says: March 19, 2013 at 12:48 pm One cannot help but wonder why the Episcopal Church is advising other parties on their failures and ways to redress those failures. After all, we are charged with obeying and teaching the Ten Commandments, including one of particular significance to the issue at hand, namely:“Thou shalt not kill”Just imagine our leading thinkers applying their resources to this one topic, and achieving 100% compliance. The tragedies would end, and the church might even grow! March 7, 2013 at 9:27 pm I find the writing of our Episcopal leadership to be weighty on good intention but thin on reality. Like most of our governmental and medical world these public statements focus on treating symptoms and not causality. I don’t know any gun owners from where I live in the south who “glorify” gun violence. “Respecting the dignity of every human being” from our Baptismal Covenant also means respecting the freedom of one another, not trying to control them. By what right does one person (bishop or priest) think they can control another’s freedom to defend their loved ones in the way they deem necessary? “Loving your neighbor” doesn’t mean allowing that neighbor to create violence on oneself or one’s family.As a priest/chaplain and a licensed mental health therapist, I have experienced what substances such as Meth do to people. Do I allow drug addicts whose lives have become bereft of all reason have free reign over the members of my family? Or do I love myself and my family to attempt to care for and protect them? This is one reason that the Second and Third Amendments were created–to protect the citizen against those who would invade their privacy and the ability to protect themselves. Does the homeowner or one who travels with a concealed carry license, limit himself/herself to a 10 round magazine while the 2 or 3 intruders (average number) who are carrying 17 shot magazines and AR-15’s with a 30 round magazine violate his/her boundary? Biden’s suggestion to women to get a 12 gauge double barreled shotgun and to shoot it as a warning outside is ludicrous, dangerous, against the law and incongruent with the spirit of the Violence Against Women Act, leaving them vulnerable. Gun control won’t eliminate the high capacity magazines from the criminal. In systems theory, often the intended inputs into a system create the opposite from the desired effect. Gun control created school zones to become vulnerable even though the intent of that control was the opposite. Violence comes from the brokenness of the soul. Gun control does not address the issues of the broken soul. Even the APA has reported their concern about confidentiality for mental health clients concerned that the background check breach of confidentiality in the form of a data base would keep those who are in need of treatment to avoid it.I too have the ideal for a world of peace and I work for it every day with my parishioners and mental health clients. I practice various forms of healing ministry. I decry violence as much as the next person. But these ideas from our Episcopal leadership are not based in reality. Beth French says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska March 2, 2013 at 9:14 am I write as a “hybrid Episcopalian,” snatched from the jaws of ennui by liturgy, lectionary, and pew aerobics, and now puzzled by the writer’s response to the House of Deputies statement on gun control. Perhaps I loll in la-la land, but that statement is not dogma, and the national Episcopal Church does not speak for its membership, but to it. Consequently, the cry of the writer that the H of D proclamation expresses “the view of the entire membership of the Church, including me,” appears somewhat fatuous, not to mention the obvious fact that the contrarian view also does not express “the view of the entire membership of the Church!.” Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR House of Deputies president, vice president issue letter on gun violence Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] Episcopal Church House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings and Vice President the Hon. Byron Rushing have issued the following letter to deputies on gun violence.February 28, 2013Dear Deputies:In the weeks since the horrific shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, the debate about guns in American life and culture has been renewed. Advocates for stricter gun restrictions vow not to let the issue be eclipsed by the next news cycle, and new coalitions of faith leaders and community activists demand that all of us, especially our children, be safe from guns in our homes, communities, and streets.Since the day when twenty-eight people died in Newtown, more than 2300 people in the United States have been killed by guns. Far too many of the dead are poor, young people of color. They have been dying for years, too often unnoticed, on the streets of Chicago, Baltimore, New Orleans, Newark and scores of other cities and towns. We have not been galvanized as we should have been by the cries of their anguished families and friends. As we work to end gun violence now, we must repent of not having done it sooner.At its meeting that concluded yesterday, the Executive Council passed a resolution that reaffirms the General Convention’s longstanding support of restrictions on the sale, use and ownership of guns and its commitment to adequate funding for mental health services. The resolution also allows The Episcopal Church to join other faith-based advocates in working to make gun trafficking a federal crime. This will give law enforcement officials the power to investigate and prosecute straw purchasers, gun traffickers and their networks. Most of all, it calls on all Episcopalians to work toward ending the cycles of violence that fuel the epidemic of gun crime.In what remains of Lent, we hope that deputies will help lead the church to fulfill this resolution.  In the words of the Executive Council resolution, let us “examine our own cultural attitudes toward violence through efforts in our own congregations and communities, to repent of our own roles in the glorification and trivialization of violence, and to commit ourselves to another way.”Faithfully,The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings      The Hon. Byron RushingPresident, House of Deputies          Vice-President, House of Deputies Rev. Dr. John W. Smith; says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Mark Bigley says: Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Read More →

Welby joins calls for protection of Pakistan’s Christians

first_imgWelby joins calls for protection of Pakistan’s Christians Asia Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Erna Lund says: Comments (1) An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted May 29, 2014 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments are closed.center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab May 29, 2014 at 5:45 pm Thank you Archbishop Welby for your Call for Protection of Children of Pakistan–and indeed for All children around the world–Suffer the little children, as our Dear Lord Jesus repeatedly declared–Matthew 19:14, Mark 10;14, Luke 18:16 … “Suffer” clearly indicated “Allow the children to come to me for of such is the kingdom of God”– Not to be hurt,exploited … yet there is no earthly power(U.S.,European countries…) or religious institution who are taking action for the brutal treatment, specifically Palestinian children in Gaza–the laboratory where Israel Military has and can arbitrarly kill, maim, destroy the children and their families with the most sophisticated weaponry provided by the U.S. government! This must STOP–Please take the lead in enjoining all clergy, governments… to save and protect our Children everywhere. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Archbishop of Canterbury, Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 [Lambeth Palace] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has said the Christians of Pakistan are a people under siege and joined calls for their churches to be protected and for them to be able to worship in safety.“Freedom of worship is a universal human right around the world, and all countries need to pay attention to that,” he said.Meanwhile, condemning the “revolting lynching” of a pregnant Pakistani woman who was stoned to death by her family in front of hundreds of people outside the Lahore high court, the Archbishop told the Times: “I was utterly horrified and every Pakistani I have spoken to is also horrified. It (the stoning) was in no sense a punishment, but but a revolting lynching.”Archbishop Justin was speaking at the end of a two-day visit to Pakistan’s Anglicans leaders in the eastern city of Lahore, during which he heard of the persecution and daily threats Christians face from Islamist militants.Pakistan is home to 3.6 million Christians – about two percent of the population – who have been targeted by the misuse of draconian blasphemy laws.Blasphemy carries the death penalty in Pakistan and cases against both religious minorities and Muslims are rising.The Archbishop added his voice to the plea for an immediate change in laws that have also been misused to target Muslims by those with a vendetta against their neighbors.“I pray for their blessing and for the government to be favorable to seeing that this is not a group that are seeking undue advantage but are only seeking to do good,” he said during a press conference.Archbishop Justin, accompanied by his wife Caroline, was visiting Pakistan at the invitation of its Anglican primate, the Most Revd Samuel Robert Azariah, Bishop of Raiwind and Moderator of the Church of Pakistan.During the visit Archbishop Justin met with Christian and Muslim leaders, attended a special service at Lahore’s Cathedral of the Resurrection, and met with high school students.The visit is the first leg of a week-long visit by Archbishop Justin to fellow Anglican primates in the region. Today the Archbishop arrived in Bangladesh, after which he will travel to India.Archbishop Justin’s visit to the region forms part of his plan to visit all of his fellow archbishops (also known as ‘primates’) during his first 18 months in office. His desire is to express solidarity, build personal and professional bonds, understand the primates’ work in their local contexts, and lay foundations for good collaboration over the coming years.See photos from Archbishop Justin’s previous primates visits on Flickr Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Anglican Communion, Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

Read More →