Employers could log on to e-mail of absent staff

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Employers could log on to e-mail of absent staffOn 5 Sep 2000 in Personnel Today The Government has extended its consultation period on laws which would allow companies to monitor e-mails and telephone calls coming into the office for certain staff while they are off sick or on holiday.Criticism about the length of the consultation period and legal technicalities within the regulations under the Act prompted the decision. The consultation, which originally ran until 25 August, will now finish on next week and the regulations will come into force on 24 October.The rules come under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act, which governs police surveillance, but also has implications for business. Draft guidelines would allow companies to intercept absent employees’ e-mails and telephone calls to check for hackers, keep tabs on business transactions and ensure employees comply with regulations.The company would not have to ask for consent from the caller or the receiver as long as it told employees it had the power to intercept communications should conditions outlined in the regulations arise.The CBI has called for further clarification of when the rules apply and is concerned that the regulations overlap with the Human Rights Act, which comes into force on 2 October.Michael Gooddie, HR director of GNER, said, “If you are going to hold companies responsible for their employees’ actions they must be allowed to monitor them.“It is crucial that staff think carefully before they write e-mails.” Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Read More →

Wyandanch Pedestrian Fatally Hit by Truck

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 58-year-old man was fatally hit by a truck in his hometown of Wyandanch on Sunday night.Suffolk County police said Keith Norman was struck by a GMC pickup truck that was making a left turn from Straight Path onto Long Island Avenue at 8:30 p.m. Sunday.The victim was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver was not injured.First Squad detectives impounded the truck, are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information on this crash to call them at 631-854-8152.last_img read more

Read More →

Sir Ian Botham’s grandson James Botham called up by Wales | Rugby Union News

first_img 0:21 Wales head coach Wayne Pivac says improvement will take time after they crashed to their sixth successive defeat against Ireland – Advertisement – – Advertisement – James Botham could make his Wales debut against Georgia
James Botham could make his Wales debut against Georgia

Read More →

England U16s return with heads held high

first_img29 May 2018 England U16s return with heads held high Tags: Spain, U16 England’s U16s have returned from Spain, defeated 16.5-7.5 in their annual international – but with their heads held high.Team captain Rob Chruszcz commented: “They were awesome. We were up against it, but at no point did anyone let their heads drop or show any sign of giving up. They kept fighting right to the end and you can’t ask any more than that.“They will have gained hugely from the experience. It was tough for them but every single person got at least half a point and that should give them so much self-confidence and self-belief. And the biggest thing of all was that they absolutely loved it!”The mixed team of eight were all aged 14 and 15, while the Spanish side were at the older end of the age range, knew the course and were well-gelled as a national U16 team.However, the England team made a great start to the match when they won the first foursomes session 2.1-1.5. The Spanish team responded with a superb singles performance, allowing just Max Hopkins to take a half point. “The golf they played was incredible,” said Chruszcz. “Our guys didn’t put a foot wrong, but Spain were exceptional.”On the second day, Spain took the foursomes 3-1 before facing a very strong challenge from England in the singles. They eventually won the session 4.5-3.5, but had to fight for it.“We came out really up for the challenge,” said Chrusczc. “We fought really hard and at one point we were up in most of the matches. Considering how heavily we lost the first singles, this was an amazing performance.”The team, coached by Alex Saary, was:Rafiah Banday, 14, Royal Mid Surrey, SurreyMia Eales-Smith, 15, Lindrick, YorkshireEllie Gower, 15, Chateau des Vigiers, FranceMax Hopkins, 15, Bishop’s Stortford, HertfordshireRory McDonald-O’Brien, 14, Lilleshall Hall, Shropshire & HerefordshireMorgan Radziejowski, 15, Herefordshire, Shropshire & HerefordshireJohn Richardson, 15, Royal Mid Surrey, SurreyCaitlin Whitehead, 15, Carus Green, Cumbrialast_img read more

Read More →

No sibling favors

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding MOST READ Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus View comments Nietes storms elite circle with venom KO AFP official booed out of forum Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university PLAY LIST 01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico Read Nextcenter_img Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa Rain or Shine hopes to punch its ticket to the quarterfinals against defending champion San Miguel Beer in the second game at 7 p.m.The Elasto Painters, who hold a 5-4 record, shift their focus on finishing at least sixth to figure in a best-of-three playoff series rather than facing a twice-to-beat disadvantage in the next round.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut the Elasto Painters will be without their resurgent star, James Yap, who will miss the game due to a calf injury. Yap has been on a tear the past few games, scoring 17 points in the 95-99 loss to Alaska last Friday.With a 4-6 record, TNT can forge at least a playoff for a quarterfinal berth in what has been a battle of survival among six teams vying for the last four tickets to the next round. LATEST STORIES Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH The Road Warriors already secured their spot in the next round as early as last week following a victory over Blackwater Elite. Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving TNT knows it can’t expect any favors from sister team, NLEX. Fortunately for the KaTropa, they will be back at full strength as they try to keep their quarterfinal hopes alive on Wednesday in the PBA Philippine Cup at Mall of Asia Arena.After missing the past couple of games following a bad fall in the clash with Magnolia, Troy Rosario returns to the lineup, while Jericho Cruz, acquired in a trade with Rain or Shine, is expected to make his debut as the flagship team of the Manny V. Pangilinan bloc hopes to avoid elimination against an NLEX team that has been in inspired form the past three weeks.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Read More →

MISSED SOMETHING LATELY? HERE’S THE LATEST NEWS

first_imgTFA are running an online survey on the NTL package that was shown on Fox Sports. If you would like to participate in the survey (and put yourself in the running for a new pair of ESUS shoes) just subscribe to the TFA email database on the front page of the website. Once you subscribe the survey will be sent out via email at the end of this week. Entries for the survey close on June 17. Well, if you’ve been trying to keep up with the TFA website over the past few days you’ll know it’s been flowing thick and fast with information.As editor of the website I’m having trouble finding both the time to write everything and the space to put it on the website…so I thought I’d save myself and everyone else a bit of time and hassle and summarise all the latest news into one story…sort of like a mini mid-week Sixty Seconds in Touch… This Friday is the dual launch of the Queensland 2006 Touch Football State of Origin Campaign and the new Sandstorm Beach Touch competition in Brisbane. Make sure you’re down at the QSAC Venue at 11:00am. The day will include a demo match with some of Queensland’s leading Origin players and also Natalie Cook, Australian Olympic Beach Volleyball Gold Medallist and Director of the Sandstorm venue and competition, as well as plenty of opportunities for the media to promote the event. The Australian Senior Squads have been announced on the TFA website. The final teams to attend the World Cup will not be decided until later this year. Players may be brought into the squads at any point. For more info call 1800 654 951 and speak to Maree Curran. The online shop was recently opened (and then closed again as we try to work through several teething problems with the new system) but already orders have been starting to come through. The new set up is pretty simple; you hit ‘TFA Merchandise’ on the left hand side of the web page and then browse through the different categories and different items. If the shop is still closed when you want to place an order, just ring 1800 654 951 and place your order online with Rachel Grant.center_img The Australian Open squads have also recently been announced and we will be updating the team lists and profiles on the TFA website soon. NTL DVD’s are selling fast, for just $20 you can purchase the package that aired on Fox Sports. Many coaches, referees and players are also purchasing the second DVD, which contains all of the raw footage and also the referee’s commentary of the Open finals for just $30. This DVD is a great resource, while the Fox package is a great promotion of the sport and very well produced. To order your copies phone 1800 654 951 and speak to Rachel Grant or visit the TFA online shop. That’s it for now, make sure you keep an eye on the TFA website daily, as the information and news is going to keep coming quick and fast! ESUS Footwear (TFA’s new sponsor), are getting ready to sell their new range of Touch Shoes both online and also at upcoming events. ESUS representatives will be heading to the Queensland Junior State Cup, State of Origin and National Under 18 Championships, as well as selling their shoes through the TFA online shop and also retail outlets.last_img read more

Read More →

9 months agoSchar welcomes praise from Newcastle boss Benitez

first_imgSchar welcomes praise from Newcastle boss Benitezby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFabian Schar has welcomed praise from Newcastle United boss Rafa Benitez.Now fully fit, the Swiss defender has impressed since his return.On Benitez’s praise, Schar told Blick: “It’s nice to hear that. He knew before my commitment what I am as a player. “I have my strengths in the game with the ball. I’m still trying to force myself to improve day after day.”Schar went down with Deportivo La Coruna last season.He added: “I do not think about that. Of course, in England, compared to Spain, you have seven to eight teams playing against relegation. That is already extreme.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More →

9 months agoBenkovic insists Celtic perfect preparation for Leicester return

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Benkovic insists Celtic perfect preparation for Leicester returnby Freddie Taylor9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFilip Benkovic says he will be ready for the Premier League after his loan stint with Celtic. The Leicester City defender has earned rave reviews for his performances in Scotland this season.And he thinks the experience will set him up perfectly for a return to the King Power.”In this period at Celtic, I feel I’ve improved as a player every day,” he told the Scottish Sun. “Here, I have to the scope to work on every aspect of my game.”That’s vital if I want to go on to play at the very top level. I feel good here and that I’m doing a good job.”Later in my career, when I look back, I want to say I did well at Celtic. I want to know that I worked hard and was very humble during my time in Scotland.”This will prepare me for the Premier League. Experience is so important for a player because it then makes it easier to deal with certain situations.”It makes you smarter. But nothing can happen without hard work because I think the Premier League is the No.1 in the world.”Here at Celtic, I play with pressure, which is good. But that’s normal for me – I came from a club in Croatia where it was the same.”I like that, I enjoy the pressure. To me that’s a positive, now and moving forward.”The last information I had from Leicester was that I am staying at Celtic until the end of the season.”I enjoy it here so that’s what I’m focusing on. After that, we will speak and see what’s for the best.”I’m having fun here and want more of it.” last_img read more

Read More →

3 days agoArsenal boss Emery upset with Pepe: You must score!

first_imgArsenal boss Emery upset with Pepe: You must score!by Paul Vegas3 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal boss Unai Emery was upset with Nicolas Pepe after defeat at Sheffield United last night.The Gunners’ £72million summer signing missed a sitter when the game was goalless – and is yet to score from open play for his new club.Lys Mousset then struck for the brilliant Blades, as Arsenal, who have never won at Sheffield United in the Premier League in four attempts, missed the chance to go third.Gunners boss Emery moaned: “The chance for us, for Pepe, was the key.“Because if they score the first goal, defensively they are a very strong team.“Pepe is improving but the next step for him is to score.“Usually he is going to score chances like that – but tonight he didn’t take his chance.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More →

Dam partnership has not changed nature of hydro development in Nisichaswayasihk say

first_imgJustin BrakeAshley BrandsonAPTN NewsNelson House, home to the Nisichawayasi Nehethowuk, sits along the north shore of Footprint Lake, about 700 kilometres north of Winnipeg, 500 from Hudson Bay, and at the convergence of the Footprint, Rat and Burntwood Rivers.For the members of Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation (NCN), it’s also the epicentre of one of the greatest events to impact their identity and way of life.Their ancestors have made the lands around the convergence of the three rivers their home for thousands of years, where they fished the bountiful waters and hunted and trapped the vast, hilly landscape.The local land-based economy evolved through settlers’ expansion into the area, which included the establishment of North West Company and Hudson Bay trading posts in the region in the late 1700s and early 1800s.One hundred years later a Roman Catholic day school was built, one run by individuals who locals have claimed in recent years sexually abused them. The school was part of the church and state’s wider effort to assimilate Indigenous children into Canadian society.Despite the disruptions to their lives, the Nisichawayasi Nehethowuk still hunted and fished for themselves, their families, kin and community well into the 20th century.But in the 1970s hydro development posed a new threat. One that didn’t target the people, or animals, but rather the thing the people and the animals depend on — the water.Displaced by HydroCarol Kobliski is 53 years old.She grew up on a small island in the middle of Footprint Lake and remembers the day Manitoba Hydro showed up at the door.“They came to our cabin and told my mom and dad they had to move off the island,” she recalled in a recent phone interview with APTN News.Kobliski said her family was offered $2,000 for the loss of their home, and that five other families in the area were forced to relocate to accommodate Hydro’s massive re-engineering of the lands and waters of the region — the Churchill River Diversion (CRD).The CRD effectively increased the output of water from the Churchill River system into the Nelson River. The Missi Falls control structure near South Indian Lake and the Notigi control structure just west of Nelson House control the flow of water out of the Churchill and into the Rat and Burntwood Rivers, which eventually flow into the Nelson.But along the path of these human-made channels and control structures are communities like Nelson House.And families like Kobliski’s.“We all had to move back on to the reserve with no home, nowhere to live, and we were scattered all over the community with relatives,” she recalls. “That’s how I grew up.”“Everything we ate came from the land”Nelson House is also home to Ramona Neckoway, who has been leading the Wa Ni Ska Tan alliance’s sixth annual tour of hydro-impacted communities and helping her people network and learn how hydro development has affected others in the region.Wa Ni Ska Tan means, “to wake up, or to rise up” in Cree, she explained to APTN on the first day of the trip.As such, a big part of the group’s mandate is not only research-oriented, but also advocacy and solutions-oriented, she said. Wa Ni Ska Tan, in working with community members, is exploring ways to help understand and mitigate the impacts of hydro development, whether it’s through funding research or land-based activities in communities, or hosting letter-writing events.At the tail-end of their trip north, Neckoway brings her Wa Ni Ska Tan colleagues to Nelson House.She grew up after the CRD so doesn’t know what it was like to have access to clean drinking water straight out of the lake.Standing on a dock behind her auntie’s house on the edge of the community, Neckoway tells the story, secondhand, of how her family members used to come down the bank to fetch water.Now, she says, her mother, aunties and uncles spend as much time as possible at their family’s camp on the other side of the lake.She’s getting ready to take the Wa Ni Ska Tan crowd there.But before she does, she humbly but honestly shares one reservation she’s having.“I don’t want us to be victimized,” she says somewhat hesitantly, referring to the way media often portrays Indigenous peoples and how those representations are often then internalized.“It doesn’t do us any good if we’re in the [victim] mindset. We need to empower ourselves. And we need people to respect fundamentally that relationship and those views that the elders have about the land and the environment.“There’s a reason why people are so upset here.”Moments later we board a small boat and head across Footprint Lake to the camp.A small log cabin sits about 150 feet in the woods back from the shore. Out front a large wooden deck where three of Necokway’s aunts and two uncles sit chatting with one another and drinking tea.They’ve prepared a meal of fresh whitefish, pickerel and jackfish, fried bannock and coleslaw.Edward Linklater tells APTN a story similar to the ones we’ve heard in other hydro-impacted communities: The water used to be clean, drinkable; the lakes were safe and navigable; the fishing and hunting were bountiful; the people were happier than they are now.But now, he explains, going out on the water is risky, and fishing isn’t feasible for most.The separation of the people from their land and waters has brought grave consequences.“We are losing our language,” Linklater says. Youth have access to Cree language programs in the school, but it’s not the same as land-based learning, he explains.“Even if they speak it, I can’t understand them.”(Elder Edward Linklater, Ramona Neckoway’s uncle, says the separation of his people from the land and water due to hydro development has contributed to his people’s loss of their language. Photo: Justin Brake)Linklater also recalls deaths in the community he attributes to changes in the waters due to hydro.A boat two of his friends were in, both of them fishermen, capsized years ago.“The current was so strong, the boat couldn’t handle it,” he says.“Other people were swept away and their bodies were never found.”Neckoway’s aunt Nina says she wants people in Southern Manitoba and Minnesota, who create demand for and consume the energy Manitoba Hydro generates in the north, to know the true cost of power.She says there was a time when “money didn’t matter” to her people. “Everything we ate came from the land.“But now all the animals are getting sick from the pollution,” she adds, explaining they don’t even eat fish from their own lake due to concerns of mercury. Now they have to travel out of the community to get their fish.Neckoway says hydro development forced her people out of their traditional economy and into one that has had too negative an impact of their well-being.“Maybe capitalism, so to speak, is part of the problem,” she says.While they appreciate the “modern amenities” and want opportunities, she says, “I kind of don’t feel that it should come at the expense of the environment.”Desecration of a sacred siteNeckoway’s family take the Wa Ni Ska Tan members across Footprint Lake to the place where the lake got its name, and also to illustrate how Manitoba Hydro and the province regard the Cree in their pursuit of energy and profits.We arrive at a cliff on the north shore of the lake, not far from the community.As the boat approaches the cliff two circles embedded in the rock come into sight. Inside each circle is what appears to be shape of a footprint.Nisachawayasihk Elder Donald Hart tells the story of Wisahkecahk and how the Cree cultural hero came to leave his footprints on the side of the rock cliff that once rested above the water. But when Manitoba Hydro informed the Nisichawayasi Nehethowuk that the water levels in their lake would rise drastically, there was little regard for the footprints despite concern from elders in the community.In 1976, with the inundation of Footprint Lake, Wisahkecahk’s footprints were underwater.Elders continued in their distress over the desecration of the sacred site, and in 1977 the footprints were cut from the submerged rock face and transported to a museum in Winnipeg. The following year they made their way back to the community, where they were put on public display.It would be a few more years before elders and the community, still unsettled by the flooding and subsequent removal of the footprints, would have the footprints returned to their place on the side of Footprint Lake.“They wanted them back, the people,” Hart explains, “because they figured it might be cursed over there [in the community], you know.”The large piece of rock once cut from beneath the water now sits atop the cliff. And Wisahkecahk’s footprints have been removed from that rock and embedded back into the rock face 10 or 20 feet above their original location, above water.(The footprints of Wisahkecahk were flooded by Manitoba Hydro in the 1970s, then removed from their original location and put in a museum before being re-embedded into a new piece of rock. Peter Kulchyski says the desecration of the sacred site shows a blatant disregard for the Cree’s religious rights. Photo: Justin Brake)In the woods about 50 feet beyond the cliff is the frame of a sweat lodge.Hart says people from his community return to the site for prayer and ceremony.Peter Kulchyski, the professor of Native Studies from University of Manitoba who helped launch Wa Ni Ska Tan and the visits to hydro-impacted communities, likens Manitoba Hydro’s flooding and desecration of the footprints to the demolition of the Sistine Chapel.“They took one of the most sacred sites in the province and they ripped it out and travelled it around, and eventually sent it back to the site, though much higher up than they were,” he later tells APTN by phone.“I think that shows a brutal disregard for the cultural heritage of the Nehethowuk people. We pay lip service to freedom of religion, but actually Aboriginal spirituality apparently doesn’t count when it comes to freedom of religion and we will affect religious sites for money, and have done so.”New relationships, same resultsManitoba Hydro says it has changed its ways since the days of forcing Indigenous people from their homes and flooding their ancestral lands.While they declined an interview for this series, Hydro spokesperson Bruce Owen told APTN by email that “much has changed in Manitoba and Canada from [that] time period.“More stringent environmental regulations and licensing requirements are in place today than 50-60 years ago…[which] ensure that all our projects minimize their impact on the natural environment and the people who live there.”The Wuskwatim and Keeyask dams, Owen says, were “developed in partnership with local communities, who have the opportunity to participate in the planning of the projects and to have an equity stake in these projects should they so choose.”But Kobliski says that as a result of Nisichawayasihk’s partnership on Wuskwatim, a 200-megawatt $1.3 billion dam built near Nelson House, her community is facing tens of millions of dollars of debt—to Manitoba Hydro, nevertheless—and no guarantee of a return on their investment.In 2006, after almost a decade of negotiations, Nisichawayasihk signed the Wuskwatim Project Development Agreement (WPDA) with Manitoba Hydro, which gives the First Nation a 33 per cent partnership on the 200-megawatt dam.The cost to NCN was $28 million plus a $56 million loan from Manitoba Hydro itself, to be paid back out of anticipated future profits.But project cost overruns, the U.S. financial crash of 2008 and a decreased demand for export energy have pushed any possibility of windfall profits for NCN into the future.The deal between NCN and Hydro has since been amended twice to protect the community from bearing the immediate financial burden of paying more due to the unforeseen circumstances.But Kulchyski says NCN is “sinking deeper into debt,” and that the restructuring of the agreements were done without community votes.“They’ve just been done between utility and the band council,” he says.Kobliski says the people in her community have not given their free, prior and informed consent to the agreement because “there wasn’t any proper consultation” with the restructuring.She says she’s been seeking answers from Chief Marcel Moody and council, but to no avail.APTN reached out to Chief Moody for comment but did not receive a response by the time of publication.“No matter what we ask around here it falls on deaf ears,” Kobliski says. “We never get a response back. And it’s been like this for many, many years.”Kobliski also says that not only have living conditions in her community not improved since the band struck the deal with Hydro — they’ve gotten worse.That includes taking into account the $56 million implementation agreement Hydro settled with NCN in 1996 to compensate for the harm caused by the Churchill River Diversion in the late ‘70s.“Ever since 1996, since the money came into our community…we’ve been having a lot of social problems in our community,” she explains.“It was escalating to the point where gang members were coming in here selling drugs. We’ve had a lot of violence in our community, a lot of domestic violence, suicide, sexual assault,” she continues, adding that “for the past 10 years it’s been really bad.”Kobliski is a First Nation safety officer for the band. She’s one of 16 officers who work with the RCMP officers in the community of 2,500, she says.She insists that as someone who checks vehicles coming into the community to enforce alcohol limits she has special insight into how her people are doing in the wake of NCN’s deals with Manitoba Hydro.“I grew up in a community where there was not much alcohol…and now there’s cocaine, there’s crystal meth, there’s marijuana, there’s ecstasy — there’s so much,” she says.“And the violence that we’re seeing in the community, it was so rapid. It’s almost like there’s a crisis going on here. The way I see it, where the money goes, the drug dealers are going to follow the money.Kobliski says trust money from NCN and Hydro’s 1996 implementation agreement has funded important programs in the community and helped build infrastructure.In 2015 Chief Moody told the Winnipeg Free Press, in an interview about restructuring the Wuskwatim deal, that the band is in fact dependent on its deal with Manitoba Hydro to compensate for lack of federal support.“We have no funding at all from the federal government to deal with housing and infrastructure,” he said, explaining his “philosophy has always been that if the government isn’t going to help us we’re going to have to do it ourselves.”But Kobliski points to the community’s drug and alcohol treatment centre—and now a women’s crisis centre currently under construction—as further indicators the prosperity promised by hydro development has not come.She says there have been issues with drinking water in the community, and that some have fallen ill.Some, like herself, don’t drink the water because they don’t trust it.She recalls a childhood memory of elders gathered in her grandfather’s home.“I remember him saying to the elders there that one day we will be buying water in water bottles. I used to wonder what he was talking about, and now I see it.”Kobliski travels 75 kilometres to Thompson every week or two to buy bottled drinking water, something not many community members can afford to do, she says.“The only time we use water that’s coming from Nelson House is to shower with, and to wash our clothes, and to clear our house.”She says her people “were fine the way we were” prior to hydro development in the region.“Everybody helped one another. Nobody had to lock their doors. We didn’t have to worry about our children. And now it’s like everybody’s fighting to survive here. Nobody’s looking out for anybody anymore. There’s so much fear. We’re living in fear of one another,” she continues, laying part of the blame on the band’s leadership.“It’s sad because the way our leaders made it sound when this project was coming through: we’re going to have this, we’re gonna have that, we’re gonna prosper. Well why are our people still living in poverty? Why are our homes still full of mould?”Kobliski also warns that Manitoba Hydro’s messaging about corporate responsibility and First Nation partnerships is deceptive.“It looks good on the outside — they’re painting a good picture of the partnership, but inside the communities we’re all suffering,” she says.“This is our territory”Back on her auntie’s dock in Nelson House Neckoway is clear that her people don’t need sympathy, “because we can confront and contest what’s going on in a dignified way.”But first that requires a public discussion and understanding of the true nature of hydro development in her territory.“My aunt used to tell me stories of my grandfather chasing away surveyors and people at Wuskwatim [Lake] in the ‘50s,” she says.“So my mom grew up as they worked there. And then I was born into the Northern Flood Agreement, my daughter was born into the implementation agreement, and then my grandson inherited the [Wuskwatim] agreement.”(Ramona Neckoway says Nisichaswayasihk Cree Nation’s agreements with Manitoba Hydro over the past 40 years “just keep getting worse and worse despite the narrative that this is an opportunity to be self-determining and self-governing.” Photo: Justin Brake.)“So those four generations, each of them has had their own experience,” she continues. “But three of four of them have inherited—been born into—these realities where each generation has their own agreement.But the agreements “just keep getting worse and worse despite the narrative that this is an opportunity to be self-determining and self-governing. I don’t buy that rhetoric, and I continue to be so opposed to this model that was used up here.“This is our reality, and the fact that you’ve got 40 years worth of agreements, 40 years worth of promises, and we’re not getting any better…now I think we can actually talk about the social consequences of what’s going on,” Neckoway continues.“And to me that’s tied to the loss of land, and the dispossession of culture, of land, of territory, of connections, kinship.”Neckoway points up to the houses on the reservation.“There’s a colonial context behind that,” she says. “This was where people came for church and school, [but] they lived in camps.“People have bought into this idea that this Indian reserve is our boundary — but out boundary is out there,” she continues, pointing across the green waters of Footprint Lake at the hills beyond.“This is our territory. The history’s out there. I can feel my ancestors out here, I can feel that connection.”jbrake@aptn.ca@justinbrakenewsabrandson@aptn.ca@ashleybrandsonlast_img read more

Read More →