Tribute to South African theatre great

first_img26 June 2015Barney Simon, the co-founder and artistic director of Johannesburg’s world- renowned Market Theatre, was one of South Africa’s most courageous and innovative playwrights and directors. Twenty years after his death in 1995, his work still speaks to live issues in contemporary South Africa, while reminding us of our brave and painful history.Armed with little more than the conviction that culture could change society, Simon’s work directly challenged the apartheid regime. Born in the RSA was developed collaboratively at the Market Theatre Company in response to the declaration of a state of emergency by then president PW Botha in July 1985, under which thousands were detained by the state security forces. Presenting a cross-section of true-to-life characters, the production told the truth about a country imprisoned by censorship.Thoko Ntshinga, who performed the role of Thenjiwe in the original production, directs this 2015 revival with an ensemble of artists (Faniswa Yisa, Roeline Daneel, Vakalisi ‘Dobs’ Madotyeni, Emily Child, Francis Chouler and Zanele Radu) who have become blue-bloods in the South African stage, television and film industry. And the current version was produced by Baxter Theatre Centre director and chief executive Lara Foot, who studied under Simon and founded the Barney Simon Young Directors and Writers Festivals.Simon was known for his method of creating original plays through a workshop process, which involved improvisation, collaborative writing and field research. He encouraged his actors to draw on direct life experience, sending them out into the streets to observe, explore and experience the textures of the lives they would then portray on the stage.Workshop creationFrom July to August 1985, Simon created and rehearsed Born in the RSA with Fiona Ramsay, Terry Norton, Vanessa Cooke, Neil McCarthy, Timmy Kwebulana, Thoko Ntshinga and Gcina Mhlope. Their improvisations were melded into a series of interconnecting monologues that escalated into a riveting drama.The production was first staged at the Market Theatre in November 1985, and went on to tour England and the US to great acclaim.“When an outsider thinks of South Africa, chances are that he does not think of VCRs, marijuana, discos, fast food, telephone answering machines, bowling clubs and ‘hot’ male bodies. It’s one of the many achievements of Born in the RSA that the audience learns just as much about such diurnal trivia as it does about detention, police brutality and the rest of apartheid’s arsenal of repression,” wrote Frank Rich in The New York Times.“In this work, politics is inseparable from the everyday life of a society. Born in the RSA is that rare political drama with the power to make participants out of history’s voyeurs.”Living newspaperWith all the actors on a neutral non-site-specific set throughout the play, it has been described as a kind of “living newspaper”. Monologues and stories are fused and interconnected, bringing to life a slice of everyday South Africa and its people at the height of apartheid.Reflecting on the curatorial thinking behind this timeous restaging, National Arts Festival artistic director Ismail Mahomed says: “Inspired by the 20th anniversary of the National Unity & Reconciliation Act of 1995 that led to the establishment of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, a small number of productions were selected to be curated under the theme of Personal and Social Reconciliation & Justice.”Other productions at this year’s National Arts Festival that also explore the hard- hitting curatorial theme are:The Imagined Land – written by Craig Higginson and directed by Malcolm Purkey, this play deals with issues of colonialism, writing and representation, as well as the nature of biography and truth;Three Blind Mice – created by the multi-award winning Fringe festivals team Rob van Vuuren, James Cairnes, Albert Pretorius and Tara Louise Nottcutt, this no-holds-barred expose of the South African legal and prison system draws on horrific and barely believable narratives around (skewed) justice that have recently dominated the media (Oscar Pretorius, Shrien Dewane, the Waterkloof Four, and Marikana);A Voice I Cannot Silence – drawing inspiration from Alan Paton’s stories, poems and autobiography, this work pays tribute to a man who was haunted by the injustices of South African society, and whose life and writing were dedicated to freedom, equality and the alleviation of human suffering; and,Moving Into Dance: Double Bill – Man-Longing is a provocative work that explores the sinister world of human trafficking, while Ngiswize sheds light on questions of community, power, individuality and masculinity in a globalised society.The Baxter Theatre Centre will stage five performances of Born in the RSA during the National Arts Festival, which runs in Grahamstown, in Eastern Cape, from 2 to 12 July.Source: National Arts Festivallast_img read more

Read More →

eMusic Users Revolt Over Latest Changes

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts eMusic, one of the world’s largest subscription-based music retailers, has for the first time added music from Sony’s catalog to its store. Most users on eMusic subscribe to the service because of the eclectic selection of independent music it offers, and very few users were excited to hear that eMusic was going to make major changes to its service, including raising the price per song just in order to give its users access to mainstream music that they were not very likely to be interested in. While eMusic did a fine job at communicating the basic changes to the service, it didn’t reveal the full extent of the changes until yesterday, and its users are anything but happy about them.Higher Price, More Restrictions, Unhappy CustomersUntil yesterday, for example, users could just re-download songs they purchased from the service (quite useful when your hard drive or MP3 player dies on you). Now, however, most likely in order to combat fraud, eMusic has put some restrictions on the number of downloads it permits per song. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags: #news#NYT#web frederic lardinois Also, while even long tracks (often in the classical or electronic music section) used to cost just one credit (users get a certain amount of credits per month, depending on their subscription plan), a lot of albums now cost 12 credits even when they only feature four or five tracks. The 12 credit idea was actually sold as a positive by eMusic, as it would allow users to download any album without having to pay more than 12 credits. That’s great for albums with lots of short tracks, but now, for a lot of users, this actually brings down the value of their subscriptions and raises prices significantly. There is also some inconsistency here, as some albums don’t yet feature the 12-credit price. According to eMusic, only about 50% of all albums have transitioned to album pricing so far.Some songs are now also only available when users purchase a complete album, whereas before, any songs could be downloaded individually.The GoodOf course, there are also some positive aspects to the new eMusic. A new feature, for example, now shows users which tracks from an album they have downloaded before and allows them to complete this album. EMusic also still offers all of its tracks as DRM-free MP3s, and some albums are now a real bargain, as you can often get albums with far more than 12 tracks for only 12 credits, and while taste is obviously debatable, we have to admit that there is also some interesting music in Sony’s catalog.Is the Customer Still King at EMusic?Where eMusic failed though, even though we have to acknowledge that it tried to communicate with its customers, is in preparing its users for these changes by being completely transparent about the updates. It’s no secret that most users don’t like change, and while there is a lot of talk on the eMusic forums about unsubscribing from the service, we will have to see how eMusic’s subscriber stats develop in the next few months. While some of eMusic’s loyal subscribers might indeed leave, having the Sony catalog in its repertoire might actually attract quite a few new users as well. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Read More →

CRS begins probe into Kolkata Metro accident

first_imgTwo days after a passenger died in an accident inside the Kolkata Metro, Commissioner of Railway Safety (Metro Circle) G.P. Garg on Monday started a probe into the incident. Mr. Garg visited the Park Street metro station and also inspected the rake which was involved in the accident.On June 13, 66-year-old Sajal Kumar Kanjilal died when his hand got struck in the Kavi Subhas-bound rake at the Park Street metro station. His body was hanging outside the train as it left the platform and ran several metres into the tunnel. Mr. Kanjilal fell on the tracks after the train stopped and was declared dead when taken to a hospital.The Kolkata Police has registered a case at the Shakespeare Sarani police station where charges have been pressed under Section 304 A (causing death by negligence). “A detailed investigation will be done. All the technical features and safety features will be looked into,” Mr. Garg said. The newly inducted rake which was involved in the accident has been withdrawn from operation. Failure of sensorsQuestions are being raised over the alleged failure of the sensors on the metro rake door which allow it to open when anything comes in-between. Subhas Ranjan Thakur, an expert on railways, said the accident was clearly a result of door-sensor malfunctioning. “It is a freak incident when one in a million times technology fails,” Mr. Thakur said.last_img read more

Read More →

D-League: JRU debuts in style with 29-point drubbing of Mila’s Lechon

first_imgPBA IMAGESJose Rizal University unveiled its new look roster with a rousing 96-67 win over Mila’s Lechon in the 2018 PBA D-League Aspirants’ Cup Thursday at Ynares Sports Arena in Pasig.Veterans Jeckster Apinan, Ervin Grospe, and Paolo Pontejos steadied the ship for the Heavy Bombers to give head coach Gio Lasquety his first win as a head coach.ADVERTISEMENT Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH NCAA volleyball: San Sebastian claims third spot, drops Letran in three Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Read Next View commentscenter_img Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH MOST READ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:02Chief Justice Peralta vows to lead by example, bares 10-point program02:42NCAA Season 93 Preview: JRU Heavy Bombers01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City LATEST STORIES John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises “It feels good. It feels better that I was the one guiding them on the floor. I’m thankful that the players responded and we were able to execute our defense,” said the 24-year-old mentor, who is now the youngest head coach in D-League history.Apinan unleashed 16 of his 20 points in the second half pullaway, to go with 14 rebounds, Grospe scattered 16 markers, and Pontejos got 14 points, six boards, and four assists to lead the charge for JRU.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Heavy Bombers blanked the Mighty Roasters in the second quarter, limiting the latter to just seven points as they took the 39-29 lead and cruised to the 29-point decimation.Leo Gabo paced Mila’s Lechon with 14 points, three rebounds, and two assists, while Andoy Estrella had 13. The Scores:JRU 96 — Apinan 20, Grospe 16, Pontejos 14, Esguerra 9, Dela Virgen 9, Tayongtong 8, Ramos 4, Mendoza 4, Bordon 4, Yu 3, Mvogo 3, Silvarez 2, Sawat 0, De Guzman 0.MILA’S LECHON 67 — Gabo 14, Estrella 13, Acibar 9, Sarangay 7, Iñigo 5, Parala 5, Derige 4, Delfinado 4, Deles 2, Crisostomo 2, Herradura 2, Luz 0, Bellosillo 0, Montuano 0.Quarters: 18-22, 39-29, 68-50, 96-67.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Read More →

Finshing first in the (digital) Olympics race

first_imgHow go the Olympics? If you’ve ever felt stumped at your lack of knowledge about what’s going on at the quadrennial sporting extravaganza in London, help is at hand.Search giant Google has dedicated an entire page to the Olympics, featuring up-to-date results and a live medals tally. It also features trivia about the Games.The Google+ page, meanwhile, allows users to access lots of information about London Olympics 2012. The page features pictures from the ongoing sports coupled with interesting asides. The page also runs regular quizzes that test the Olympics knowledge of its 8,79,260 followers (and counting).For those who’ve missed the flight to London, you also get a live feed of all the proceedings at the Games, via streaming on YouTube. To round out the whole experience, you can take a gander at the sights of London and the Games venues in the form of 3D Maps and through Google Earth.Thanks to the page, I’ve been able to score a few brownie points among my friends by giving them the latest dope on the Olympics. These true-blue sporting fanatics have been left speechless at my “enormous and updated knowledge” about the Games.But they’re friends and so I decided to let them partake of some Games excitement when they take some time off from their high-paying drab and dreary 9-to-5 jobs.’How about a Gaming Olympiad?’ I asked my buddies.’We’ve heard of Maths and Science Olympiads – remember those fierce contests back in school?’ They reminded me. Uh-oh, I need to break it down.’Guys, it’s the Zapak Gaming Olympiad – an online destination featuring live updates from London 2012 and a chance to participate in virtual Olympicstyled events.’ The website offers a bunch of games including, Field Hockey, which is about building one’s own team with 5 players, make goals for them, and play; Hurdles Run, where one needs to reach the finish line fastest without tripping; King of the Ring, for all the Wannabe Vijenders and Mary Koms; and Table Tennis Pro, where all actual rules and points of the game apply.The gaming zone, available on the web as well as well as on WAP for mobiles, features a leaderboard highlighting the top performers in each game. And up for grabs in each category is a motorbike for the one who tops the leaderboard. By the way, this website also provides updates on the Games.Google has also come up with an interesting statistic about the ‘Olympics’ keyword search. The digital giant’s insights for search, an analytical tool which allows users/brands to discover search trends, found that Assam searched the highest for ‘Olympics’ so far this year, followed by Pondicherry, Kerala and Orissa.And out of the top 10 places that searched for Olympics the most, a majority of them are non-metros.The Olympic fever, it seems, has permeated to the distant nooks and crannies of the country.Even if you don’t have Internet connectivity in these remote places, you still have a humble cellphone trawling the World Wide Web – and, more likely than not, you’re looking up the Olympics.RE-BOOTiPod dockQ. I’m a light sleeper and want to fall asleep listening to my iPod. But I don’t want to put on headphones.What would be a good iPod dock? Charu Sharma (via email)A. Most of us don’t get enough sleep these days and falling asleep to the strains of music should help.Q. While there are many good docks from firms such as Logitech and JBL, the GEAR4 Renew SleepClock not only serves as a dock, but also tracks and manages your sleep – without any contacts. Based on your sleep patterns, the device wakes you up only after you’ve had proper rest.A. La Mode Via iPhoneThe fashion week may be getting over today but there’s no reason to not celebrate sartorial elegance. ‘My Fashion Assistant for iOS’ is a must have for any fashionista. Also check out the free apps ‘Snapette Style Tag’ and ‘Style Me’ on the App Store.’Bheem’ in your handsIf your child loves Chhota Bheem – the animation sensation that has kids entranced – this is a must have. POGO and Jump Games have launched Chhota Bheem: Mice Mayhem for Java and BlackBerry, where Bheem has to save laddoos from rats. Check it out.Cooking up some appsVikas KhannaWhat does a celebrity chef have to do with technology? Plenty; Vikas Khanna (in pic ), famous for feeding Barack Obama authentic Indian food at his Junoon restaurant in New York, confessed recently that he is no geek, but an Amritsar boy who loves to stay in touch with his roots.Helping him do this are various apps which Nokia showcased for their range of Lumia phones, running Windows Phone 7.5. The apps were divided into four groups, each with a unique feature, while guests were plied with another kind of apps – appetisers – with wine.Hitting the bull’s-eyeEver wondered what Olympic shooters use to look closely at the shots they’ve taken? Those long lenses are called fieldscopes, which could also come in handy for birdwatchers (of both varieties). Nikon has launched fieldscopes with VR (vibration reduction) lenses in India along with its range of sports optics such as binoculars and laser rangefinders. While the magnification offered by the high end binoculars will gladden the hearts of ornithologists, the entry-level ones are just right for any leisure trip.Olympian productsVijay KumarOlympic medal-winners like Vijay Kumar (in pic ) are set to be honoured, and receive royalties, from Milagrow Human-Tech, makers of specialised tablets and domestic robots, who are making special edition products in their names. “We decided on launching the special edition products before the tournament started… We are not looking for any endorsement but honouring them so that they inspire a billion,” said Rajeev Karwal, Milagrow founder and CEO.advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

Read More →

UAAP volleyball: UST still alive for twice-to-beat after thumping NU

first_imgSEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte ADVERTISEMENT In winning their fourth straight match, the Tigresses will earn a playoff for that bonus if Far Eastern University defeats La Salle on Sunday in the last day of eliminations.Season’s top Most Valuable Player contender Sisi Rondina turned in MVP numbers with 21 points, all on attacks, to power UST’s 10th win in 14 matches going into the Final Four.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsThe Tigresses, who have won in straight sets the three previous matches, dropped the third set when the determined Lady Bulldogs established up six set points.But NU could not sustain the intensity into the fourth as it bade farewell to the season with a 4-10 record. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid Enes Kanter uncertain for Portland’s 2nd round series with hurt shoulder MOST READ PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIEScenter_img Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated MANILA, Philippines–University of Santo Tomas contained National University’s nothing-to-lose attitude with a 27-25, 25-17, 20-25, 25-16, Saturday to keep its hopes alive for a twice-to-beat incentive in the UAAP women’s volleyball at FilOil Flying V Center.ADVERTISEMENT Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess View commentslast_img read more

Read More →

10 months agoUEFA chief warns Man City risk ‘heaviest punishment’ and Champions League ban

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say UEFA chief warns Man City risk ‘heaviest punishment’ and Champions League banby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City have been warned they risk a Champions League ban by a UEFA official.UEFA’S chief financial investigator has confirmed that City could indeed be banned from the Champions League if they are found guilty of a further breach of Financial Fair Play regulations.Yves Leterme, the head of Uefa’s independent Club Financial Control Body (CFCB), has told a Belgian publication that City may now face “the heaviest punishment”.The Daily Mail says it is claimed the Abu Dhabi United Group, the holding company which owns City, directly paid £59.5m of Etihad’s annual sponsorship, with only £8m coming from the airline.UEFA and the Premier League are investigating the claims and in an interview with Sport and Strategy Leterme has said: “If it is true what has been written, there might be a serious problem. This can lead to the heaviest punishment: exclusion from the Uefa competitions.”If the information is correct, this possibly goes against truthful reporting. The financial fair play rules are based on a system of declaration, three months after the clubs have closed their accounts, they have to deposit their figures. Then we do random checks on the truthfulness of those figures. The accounts are examined and approved internally and externally.” last_img read more

Read More →

The Only 10 Teams That Can Win The 2016 NCAA Tournament

first_imgCollege Spun's NCAA tournament bracket.college spun bracketOn Sunday night, the 68-team NCAA Tournament field will officially be revealed, and fans of each of those programs will begin to map out how they will take home the title, no matter how realistic it may be. While it is always fun to see a Cinderella squad make a run, the group of teams that can realistically win six straight games and take home the title is pretty limited.The 2015-16 college basketball season has been pretty crazy, with a handful of teams hitting No. 1 in the polls. However, as we get into the conference tournaments, an upper tier of teams has started to set itself apart from the pack. Upsets happen, and anything can occur in March, but in all likelihood your next national champion will come from one of these 10 schools.Next: Duke >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11last_img read more

Read More →

Language Keeper The last fluent speaker of Stólōs Indigenous dialect in race

first_imgAudio Playerhttp://aptn.ca/news/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2016/07/Elizabethspeaking.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Above: Phillips speaks the phrase “simple language for beginners” in Upriver HalkomelemIt seems like yesterday to Phillips that a group of Stó:lō elders would gather to speak Upriver Halkomelem and record what they knew in a dictionary. It was a time when she could have long conversations on the phone with friends without speaking a word of English.But those elders’ deaths came in rapid succession – more than 20 in the last two decades.Those elders were all a decade or two older than Phillips, who was always the youngest one in language groups, but she got invited to attend before she was an elder because of her unique ability to speak fluently even after residential school.Several years ago, an elder named Elizabeth Herrling who was working to record the language in stories died at 93, which is when Phillips stepped up her work to record it.Above: a torch lighting story told by HerrlingSadly, Phillips is now left with no one to have real conversations with, but she still thinks in Halkomelem and communicates as much as she can with speakers who are learning, including her daughter Vivian.“I try my best not to lose it, because I can’t have conversation,” she says.“But I text in Halkomelem.”Phillips pauses, then bursts into laughter at the notion.“The phone is always trying to correct me!”Strang Burton, a linguist, and Phillips sit outside of the elders home.PreservationMost of the languages probably are going to come to a place where people aren’t speaking them fluently.”– Strang Burton, linguistJoining in on her laughter is Strang Burton, who works for the Sto:lo Shxweli language program and UBC’s linguistics department.Phillips and Burton have been working together for nearly two decades and they switch easily between having serious, quiet conversations and laughing jovially together. Burton calls her “Siem,” a Halkomelem word that, in English, loosely means “respected one.”Together, they’ve recorded many stories and other language material. Burton got the idea to do a language ultrasound on Phillips when he saw other linguists using the equipment on Mandarin and Japanese.“I thought, well, let’s do it for Halkomelem, because people were having trouble with the sounds of Halkomelem,” he says.Burton believes it to be the first time the technology has ever been used on an Indigenous language in Canada.He said he hopes it will allow people who are teaching the language in local schools to improve their pronunciation of the language, which is notoriously tricky.He plans to impose the ultrasound images with external videos he’s taking of Phillips’s mouth so that others can see how her mouth and tongue move as she’s speaking. [email protected]@CaraMcK Linguists record ultrasound video of Phillips speaking.But, after decades of work, Burton is realistic about the prospects of a severely endangered language like Upriver Halkomelem truly being saved.“Most of the languages probably are going to come into a situation where people aren’t speaking them fluently,” he says. Time is Ticking“For people to become really fluent again, that requires something social to happen.”– Strang BurtonThe reality in British Columbia is a bleak one – the province is home to more than half of Canada’s 60-odd Aboriginal languages, and almost all of them are in danger of disappearing.The languages are a crucial part of culture, ceremony and connection. Many Indigenous words can’t be translated accurately into English.In the Canadian Liberal government’s first federal budget earlier this year, it was announced that $5 million per year would be siphoned into supporting the country’s Indigenous languages, in comparison to more than $2 billion for French.“Considering the number of First Nations languages there are in Canada, it’s not a lot,” Burton says.“If there were just one First Nations language in Canada, I guess that would be a lot.”More funding is certainly needed to continue crucial work to preserve languages, but Burton says, more than that, fluent speakers like Phillips are needed to pass the languages along. And they’re dying off at a worrisome rate.“For people to become really fluent again, that requires something social to happen,” Burton says.“Which is happening maybe a little bit.”But the small changes are not enough. Burton says, what is realistic, is that people can experience the language through stories about people’s lives and traditional practices. That’s what he’s trying to do through his current work with Phillips and previous work with other elders.“Without a Native speaker to go to for subtle translations and things, you’re never going to be sure you’ve got it exactly right,” he says.“But with the resources we have, probably if people get together and they want to speak, there’s enough stuff that they could access in the archives to help them have a real conversation.”center_img An outside view of Phillips’s home.Burton believes the community is positive, and he has seen many children learning the language through school programs, which is hopeful to Phillips.Many years ago, before Phillips’s own mother passed away, she asked her daughter Vivian to live with her, which has helped her to become proficient in the language and pass it down to her own children.“That’s quite an honour because that was so forbidden, you know,” she says.“A lot of our people were punished because they spoke their language.”It’s a painful subject to breach, and Phillips gets distracted mid-thought when she notices an eagle flying above her. She smiles at the reminder of strength and power.“They always seem to know what’s going on,” she says. Elizabeth Phillips reads aloud words in her Indigenous language.Cara McKenna APTN National NewsThe Stó:lō people are named in their language after the Fraser River, which is the community’s lifeblood and flows through their picturesque territory southeast of Vancouver, B.C.Just a few generations ago, dozens of people spoke the nation’s language of Upriver Halkomelem.But in the last decade, almost all fluent speakers have died.There is just one elder left who early in life had to fight to keep her language, and is now trying to pass it on before it’s too late.The Knowledge HolderI try my best not to lose [my language], because I can’t have a conversation.”– Elizabeth Phillips, Stó:lō elderWhen Elizabeth Phillips was a child, she was put into St. Mary’s Indian Residential School in Mission. She was forbidden to speak the language that both of her parents spoke to her as a baby.Phillips was a loner at the school and supervising nuns became concerned that she wasn’t associating with other children enough.While other children played, she would stand alone at the outside gate, staring out at the Fraser River and thinking in her language.“And I guess that’s what saved me,” she says now, sitting outside her home in the Fraser Valley.Phillips’s small red house stands in stark contrast to rolling green hills and clear blue sky. Nearby is the Fraser.‎Part of Sto:lo Nation’s traditional territory near Chilliwack, B.C.Inside, three linguists from the University of British Columbia are bustling around her kitchen and setting up an array of ultrasound equipment as Phillips observes the elaborate set up.Phillips laughs good-heartedly when one of the linguists explains that she’ll need to put some goopy ultrasound gel under her chin.It might be the first time anyone has done an ultrasound on her mouth, but the experience of being recorded by academics is not a new one for Phillips.At 77, she’s the last known fluent speaker of the Stó:lō Nation’s Upriver Halkomelem language (also called Halq’eméylem) – a Salish dialect that’s related to two other Halkomelem dialects, but distinct to the Stó:lō people.last_img read more

Read More →

Five projects in Northeast BC get Rural Dividend grants

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The B.C. government announced today that five projects in Northeast B.C. will be getting $567,190 in funding from the Province’s Rural Dividend Program.The funding is part of nearly $8 million in 58 project grants being awarded to eligible local governments, First Nations and not-for-profit organizations through the Program.The Community Futures Peace Liard is receiving a grant of $112,200 to deliver a virtual entrepreneur training program, a Junior Dragons’ Den, and a mentorship program for students in grades 7 to 12, as well as those taking post-secondary and trades training classes. The District of Chetwynd is getting $20,000 in funding complete improvements to three local trails. Futurpreneur Canada is being awarded $311,100 to continue the ThriveNorth programs in 2019. The Fort Nelson First Nation is being awarded $50,000 to complete business and technical planning necessary to help secure a forest licence for birch stands, while the Northern Rockies Regional Municipality is being awarded $73,890 to guide future economic development for the municipality.“Government is following through on its commitment to help rural communities navigate changes that have impacted local economies, by supporting local business development and creating new partnerships to promote shared prosperity,” Donaldson said. “These rural dividend grants are bringing positive change to rural communities throughout B.C.”Earlier this month, nearly $5 million was granted to fund 30 projects in wildfire-impacted areas and two communities that were affected by the shutdown of local mills.last_img read more

Read More →