Britain mulls Omani naval port development

first_img View post tag: Duqm Authorities View post tag: Royal Navy Britain is intending to form a joint venture company between the British defence contractor Babcock International and the Oman Drydock Company that would develop the Omani Duqm Port to support naval vessels.During a visit to Oman, Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said the multi-million pound undertaking would allow the Duqm Port complex to host the world’s naval vessels, including the UK’s new Queen Elizabeth Class Aircraft Carriers.Michael Fallon said: “This partnership will bring British engineering expertise to help develop Duqm as a strategic port for the Middle East on the Indian Ocean, benefiting the Royal Navy and others.”The project would allow UK to have a more permanent presence in the region and to cater for its wider maritime needs in the area.During his visit, the Defence Secretary reaffirmed the longstanding relationship between the UK and Oman by signing a new Memorandum of Understanding which allows the countries to continue conducting exercises and training together. Britain mulls Omani naval port developmentcenter_img Back to overview,Home naval-today Britain mulls Omani naval port development April 1, 2016 Share this articlelast_img read more

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Ween Plays The Classics For Night Two Of New York City Run [Watch]

first_imgLoad remaining images You can see the full setlist from last night, below:Setlist: Ween at Terminal 5, New York, NY – 4/15/16Set: Transdermal Celebration, Take Me Away, Learnin’ to Love, Big Jilm, Piss Up a Rope, Nan, Mister Richard Smoker, Stroker Ace, Transitions, Buckingham Green, Voodoo Lady, The Argus, I Play It Off Legit, Puerto Rican Power, Gabrielle, Wayne’s Pet Youngin, The Goin’ Gets Tough From the Getgo, Don’t Shit Where You Eat*, The Mollusk*, Stacey*, I Don’t Want to Leave You on the Farm*, Mutilated Lips*, Don’t Sweat It*, Put the Coke on My Dick, Demon Sweat, Ocean Man, Loop de Loop, How High Can You Fly?, Stay Forever, Tick, Papa Zit, Never Squeal> Drums> Improv/Jam> Never SquealEncore: Buenas Tardes Amigo*acoustic[Setlist via Brownbase]Check out a full gallery of images from night one below, courtesy of Chad Anderson: Ween continued their conquest of New York last night, playing their second of three sold-out shows at the Terminal 5 venue in New York, NY. The group carried on with their trend of monster-sized setlists, playing a total of 33 songs throughout the night. When the band brought out with “Transdermal Celebration” to start the show, fans knew they were in the right place.The group played a number of their staples, like “Take Me Away,” “Piss Up A Rope,” “Buckingham Green,” “Gabrielle” and so many more. The band even went acoustic for a six-song run in the middle of the set, stripping down tracks like “Don’t Shit Where You Eat” and “The Mollusk” to a captivated audience. The set ended with a potent rendition of “Never Squeal,” which featured a drum solo and an improv/jam segment to keep the fans on their toes.The show ended with a fond farewell, as the band encored with “Buenas Tardes Amigo.” Watch a handful of videos from the show below:last_img read more

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Sayer weathers injuries to earn vacated goalie spot

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 19, 2010 at 12:00 pm Commentscenter_img Rachel Sayer isn’t normal. And Syracuse field hockey head coach Ange Bradley means that in the most complimentary way possible. After Sayer injured her knee two months ago for the second time since joining SU in December, it would have been ordinary to limit herself until the end of the season, when doctors told her she might be healthy again. It would have been expected of Sayer to be content cheering her team on from the sideline. She wasn’t. The freshman goalkeeper trained as hard as she could, putting in as much grueling work as possible with the intention of being ready and healthy before the end of the season. And in the week before SU’s game at Albany, Sayer heard what she had been waiting to hear since she graduated a semester early from high school. She had earned the starting goalkeeper spot for the Orange.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text ‘I was excited, and I couldn’t wait to get back onto the field,’ Sayer said. ‘I hadn’t played in almost a year, and coming back from injuries are never easy, but doing rehab and training got me back where I needed to be. This is what I live for. This is my sport. So being out on the field was just great.’ Sayer’s start came after Bradley deactivated four starters for undisclosed reasons, including sophomore goalkeeper Leann Stiver. But Bradley said Sayer rightfully won the job. Despite the controversy surrounding the Orange, Sayer’s performance has proved she is capable of playing for a Top 10 program. The freshman goalkeeper has put up ‘spectacular’ results, her teammates said, picking up the first three wins of her young career and holding two ranked opponents to a combined two goals. Her contribution has been essential in a key stretch of the season. ‘Rachel is an outstanding competitor,’ Bradley said. ‘I knew she always had that mental toughness in her, but unfortunately she was plagued by injuries last spring. Everything she’s worked for and had taken away from her was just there, and she celebrated that moment.’ Though that moment was earned through her intense training, the physical rehab she had to go through nearly eliminated the true reason she arrived early to Syracuse. Sayer wanted to get a jump on the tough transition to the college game, but her injuries diverted much of her focus to simply getting healthy enough to play. Sayer said one of the biggest casualties of her redirected concentration was the ability to constantly communicate with her defense. But like every other obstacle she has encountered as a member of the Orange, she has been working hard to overcome it. ‘There are different methods of communication, but all of the goalies that we have on our team (have been able to) communicate well with the defense,’ sophomore back Iona Holloway said. ‘I think she did so well for her first starts of the season.’ Though the isolation of her extensive workouts rarely gave her the opportunity to build that chemistry with her defense, she credits the encouragement and support of her teammates with the fact that she was healthy two weeks earlier than expected. Normally, a player with Sayer’s injuries wouldn’t have been cleared to play until there was a week to go in the season. Ordinarily, a player with no previous college experience couldn’t shut down two ranked opponents away from home. But even in the face of a dire late-season changeup for her team, Bradley was expecting Sayer to act normal in her debut all along. ‘She has perseverance, and she knows how special it is to be out on the field,’ Bradley said. ‘I think that says so much for someone who takes advantage of an opportunity. That’s a winner, and I’m proud to be standing with her and next to her.’ [email protected]last_img read more

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Business association leader says supply issues main concern right now

first_imgDES MOINES — Many businesses across Iowa are encouraging or ordering employees to work from home indefinitely, but it’s not an option for many of us, especially factory workers.Mike Ralston, president of the Iowa Association of Business and Industry, says he’s not aware of any major factory closures in the state due to coronavirus, but it’s certainly having a chilling effect on commerce.“The biggest impact for Iowa manufacturers so far is not that they have to close their doors, but that they’re experiencing issues involving their supply chain,” Ralston says. “Maybe they work with a vendor who can’t get a product to them so they can’t make their product — or they have delays in their product. That’s probably the biggest thing.”Iowans are innovative and they’re finding ways to work around their challenges, Ralston says, even during a national emergency. He adds, many Iowa manufacturers don’t keep a lot of inventory in stock, which is often a smart practice, but not so much during this situation.“What they’re doing is trying to find different suppliers, having some success with that,” Ralston says. “In other ways, they’re delayed in delivering their final product. So those are probably the two biggest things, finding other suppliers, and they’re able to do that so far, or just having delays in their delivery.”Most Iowans who work in factories can’t “shelter in place” and do their work from anywhere other than the workplace, so Ralston says employers are taking precautions.“It’s tough to have a manufacturing production worker work from home — that obviously doesn’t work,” Ralston says. “In many plants and factories, workers by nature are at least six feet apart in most situations. They’re also trying to make sure that employees, when they take breaks, for instance, that they maintain social distancing.”Ralston has a message for Iowa consumers, urging them to continue doing their part to keep the wheels of industry turning. “Be safe with your family but try to make it business as usual,” Ralston says. “Make sure the goods and services you normally purchase you’re purchasing in some way still. Pay attention to what the experts are telling us about health and safety, and as much as possible, try to make it business as usual.”The Association of Business and Industry is Iowa’s largest statewide business organization with more than 1,500 member companies representing 330,000 working Iowans.last_img read more

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Gateway boys making a name as WPIAL powerhouse

first_imgby Malik VincentFor New Pittsburgh CourierEven though Section 2 of the WPIAL Class AAAA conference is filledwith some of the region’s best athletic talent, Gateway, an undefeated 6-0, refuse to sell themselves short in any way.With three players that are 6-foot-5 and taller, the Gateway boys basketball team features one of Western  PA’s tallest starting lineups.Similar to the Boston Celtics–before Rajon Rondo pushed himself into the equation–Gateway has a trio of players that they refer to as their ‘big three’.It is made up of 6-foot-7 senior Devon Cottrell and three-year junior letter-winners in swingman Tyler Scott (6-foot-6) as well as big man Barnett Harris (6-foot-10).“You can rely on the fact that two of the big three is always going to be on the court for us,” Gateway coach Mitch Adams said.That type of star-power helped Gateway to knock off St. Vincent-St. Mary’s prep out of Akron, Ohio, the school that produced the Miami Heat superstar and NBA icon, LeBron James, 62-55, at the Battle of the Borders tournament that was hosted by the Gators.“It felt like just another game on the schedule,” Adams said. “It didn’t feel much different than any other win. We have to do what we have to do, each and every game.”They’ve already defeated section rivals Penn Hills and Woodland Hills.“One thing that those two have in common is that they’re both very athletic,” Adams said. “What’s going to determine the outcome of this is focus and consistency. We’ve got to stay focused for the 30 games that we’ll, hopefully, play this year.”According to Scott, Cottrell can be compared to the New York Knicks stud Amare Stoudamire with his ability to score in many ways, rebound, and block shots in the paint.“He’s a huge asset to our team,” Scott said.Cottrell’s coach mentioned that he joined the Gateway program in the 7th grade as a ball boy, and has been a part of it since.“He’s like a son to me,” Adams added.Similarly each of the ‘big three’ have garnered a diverse amount of attention from Division-I programs.  St. Peters and Tennessee-Martin have placed official scholarships on the table for Cottrell. Robert Morris, Loyola-Maryland, Chicago, and Tennessee-Chattanooga are also displaying interest.Scott also described fellow star, Harris, as a big man who can handle the ball, see the court, and also work well in the post and can “dominate a game at will.”Harris and Scott, as juniors, have gotten official scholarship offers from Duquesne. Tyler’s father, Rod, played at Duquesne from 1979-82.Scott could be one of the WPIAL’s best scorers. He averaged 15.5 points per game as a sophomore and has already registered multiple 20 point games so far this season. With that, he gets a lot of attention, but not always the kind he wants.“There have been times when defenses have recognized how hard it is to match up with us,” Scott said. “They get frustrated quickly. We recently held Norwin to 47 points and they weren’t too happy about that. I once went up for a dunk, an alley-oop, against them and I got upper-cutted right before I got to the rim. It’s very frustrating sometimes.”Scott also has interest from Kent State, Cleveland State, Tennessee-Chattanooga, and Detroit. (Malik Vincent can be reached at [email protected])last_img read more

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Croydon Hall Memorial Recalls “An Extraordinary Person”

first_imgThe memorial to Daniel Piano at Croydon in Leonardo.Colleen Piano speaks about her deceased son, Daniel as daughter Julianne Piano lends her support.By Eileen Moon MIDDLETOWN – Colleen Piano has many happy memories of her son, Daniel’s growing up years in Leonardo. “He was a special kid,” she said recently, recalling the many hours he spent playing ball and skateboarding at Croydon Hall, a township park off Leonardville Road.Only 18 years old, Daniel died on September 2 in an early morning accident on Chapel Hill Road in Middletown.Earlier that day, Daniel had been at Brookdale Community College, picking up textbooks he would need for his first semester as a college student.But that was not to be.His funeral took place on September 6, the day he would have started classes.As news of the accident circulated, his friends from high school quickly established a makeshift memorial for Daniel at the side of Chapel Hill Road, but that was not a place that his mother wanted to visit.“Losing a child is just horrific,” she told Colleen Piano speaks about her deceased son, Daniel as daughter Julianne Piano lends her support.he Two River Times last week. “I would give my right arm to have him back in my life.”Shy and reserved in his early years, Daniel grew into a sociable young man whose caring nature won him many friends.“In his 18 years, he touched so many lives,” Colleen said, who took a family leave from Monmouth Medical Center, where she is employed as an executive assistant, following the death of her son.In the midst of her grief, she paid a visit to a psychic – a former religious sister, who told her that she would receive a beautiful, handwritten letter.On the first of Nov., a handwritten letter arrived, written about Daniel by his Italian teacher in high school, Lina Santori. Santori related how Daniel had approached her at the start of the year, looking directly into her eyes as he introduced himself, saying, “How are you? I’m Dan Piano.”The simple introduction was a good example of Daniel’s concern for others, the teacher noted, commenting on what an extraordinary person Daniel was.“He was so much more mature than his peers – he became her favorite,” Colleen said.And as she struggled daily with her grief, Colleen decided that she needed to create a memorial to her son; a place of peace where she could remember again the happy years that Colleen, Daniel’s father, also Daniel Piano, and their daughter, Julianne, had shared with Daniel.After obtaining permission from the township, Colleen arranged for the construction of a memorial for Daniel at Corydon Hall, where Daniel had spent so many happy hours of his childhood.The costs involved in creating the memorial were covered by private donations as well as donations of labor and materials. The memorial includes a brick walkway, a park bench and a Kwanzan Cherry tree.On Nov. 20, the Piano family and their friends gathered at the memorial to share their tears, and to remember the gift of Daniel.last_img read more

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