Queen’s crash and burn at Hugh’s

first_imgSt Hugh’s 2Queen’s 1They may be the Queen’s college but there has been nothing regal about Queen’s start to their Cuppers campaign. This was the upset of the first round. Although Hugh’s have an established reputation as a top flight club and a side capable of reaching the latter stages of this historic competition, Queen’s bring with them a vast array of Blues talent, apparently superior football ability and, at least before the last two games, a feared reputation as the best side in Oxford. What they did not have, it would seem, was Hugh’s fighting spirit, or their good fortune.For 90% of the game Queen’s looked as if their royal reputation was at least partly justified. After a sluggish start they had begun to move the ball better, finding gaps in the Hugh’s defence and, although never looking as inventive or incisive as their status would suggest, looked to be trampling Hugh’s resolve in a blitz-like example of attritional warfare. But two shock second half goals in an ocean of subordination, two careless moments from a complacent Queen’s defence, created two moments of joy for a Hugh’s side who had endured an afternoon of struggle and apprehension.It appears as though another lengthy cup run could be on the cards for the men in yellow.Hugh’s had reached half time a goal adrift and then it seemed that only one result was likely. Sush Yaliamanychili’s 25th minute strike had provided Queen’s with a deserved lead and, with the half time introduction of the inspirational Kurosh Nikbin, victory and the end of their early season nightmare seemed assured. But it was here that Hugh’s blitz spirit showed through. Their first goal came on 60 minutes as Christos Hajipapas, to the bewilderment of both sets of fans, found himself alone in the area and advancing on the goalkeeper, managing to hold his nerve and lift the ball over the keeper’s sprawled form. It represented Hugh’s first shot on target in the game and seemed both to shock them out of their reverence and turn Queen’s defence into a bundle of nerves. Adam Macanelly terrorised the Queen’s right back, throwing himself into three consecutive challenges while Matt Sale almost gave his side the lead with another one-on-one opportunity. Hugh’s blood was up. After being out-battled and outclassed by Nikbin and treated with imperious disdain by the excellent John Butterfield for the whole match, they could finally sense their opportunity.With 75 minutes gone the battlers overcame the artistes. A long throw caused panic in the area, a goalmouth scramble ensued and the ball ricocheted into the path of Adeep Rawal who turned it in to the empty net from ten yards. It was another goal that came against a tide of Queen’s possession and intense pressure, but the visitors had deservedly suffered for their complacency. To Hugh’s handful of attacks, Queen’s had spawned a host of excellent opportunities. Yalamanchili, Carpenter, Nikbin and Zacariah had all forced their way through the Hugh’s defence but none of them had converted. Theirs had been a dominant but messy performance and they had been punished mercilessly.There was more anguish to come later on for Hugh’s: Nikbin twice went close from outside the box, but they deservedly held out and recorded a memorable cup upset. It was a clinical, professional, if workmanlike performance from the underdogs against which the royal colours of Queen’s had no answer. They will have to fight hard if they want to retain their crown.Despite being lauded universally as pre-season favourites and tipped to extend their dominance of the college football landscape, resounding opening day defeat has been followed by this: a lethargic and supercilious embarrassment against a team they would expect to stroll past and, for the second time in as many seasons, their ignominious exit from Cuppers before their campaign had seriously begun. ARCHIVE: 3rd week MT 2005last_img read more

Read More →

Authentic leadership starts at the top

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Renée Sattiewhite Renée Sattiewhite is the President and CEO of the African-American Credit Union Coalition (AACUC) and is responsible for the execution of the strategic vision of the Board of Directors. … Web: https://www.aacuc.org Details This is placeholder text “Leadership starts at the top.” That is a common phrase that we have all heard before, right? It is a motivational, digestible, and relatable saying. It empowers employees to hold leadership accountable and it also highlights executives’ ability to spark meaningful change. It is a common phrase that resonates across pay scales and jumps across cultural lines. That is why we use it so much.But do we embody this phrase when it comes to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI)? Has this platitude lost its meaning within the bounds of culture change?If we look at the board rooms and C-suite management in the credit union movement, then the answer should be clear. Credit unions have a diversity problem at the leadership level.How can we say that DEI is a top priority when our leadership – which starts at the top – demonstrates otherwise? Why do we adorn our corporate messaging with phrases like this without holding up our end of the bargain?The problem of diversity at the leadership level is deep rooted. I feel that we often forget that our “people helping people” movement was established during a time when women couldn’t vote, segregation was lawful, people of color were denied basic human rights, the LGBTQ community was not tolerated and the Great Depression forced unemployment for blue-collar workers.Since then, times have changed – and drastically so.America’s population is multicultural, and each generation is becoming more racially diverse than the last. According to 2019 data from the U.S. Census Bureau, for the first time, more than half of the nation’s population under age 16 identified as a racial or ethnic minority.If the nation is changing, then we must assess how we will change with it. We must ask ourselves difficult questions we may already know – or do not want to know – the answer to. If DEI is a top priority, then we must accept that the diversification of the country has accelerated the need for a commitment to cultural change.And that change starts at the top.Let me pose a few questions. Not to be facetious but to be serious about a problem that threatens the longevity of the credit union movement.What percentage of your leadership represents working women and mothers?How many Millennial employees are given a seat at your board room table?Who is representing people of color on the board and at the C-suite level?When is the last time you hired an executive level leader who once struggled financially?If the answer to these questions does not align with your organization’s appetite for DEI, then you may have a diversity problem at the leadership level.Authentic leadership starts at the top.Without diverse representation at the top level, everything that flows down from leadership will remain where it always has been. There will be no real impetus for change.Be encouraged to know that we are not walking alone on the road of DEI. Organizations across America are having important conversations about diversity. Nasdaq, for example, will ask the S.E.C. for permission to adopt a new requirement for companies listed on its main U.S. stock exchange to have at least one woman and one diverse director – and to report data on board diversity.The lack of information nor an inadequate talent pool cannot be an excuse. If we want to be a forward-thinking, future-driven, and culturally-relevant industry it is imperative that we align with our evolving new reality.We must act quickly and commit to meaningful change. A change that starts at the top.I will leave you with this quote:“A genuine leader is not a searcher for consensus, but a molder of consensus.” – Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.center_img This post is currently collecting data…last_img read more

Read More →

Ponting’s epic 2003 World Cup final ton

first_img…Legendary batsman struck one of his best centuries and leads Australia to World Cup triumph on this day in 2003HAVING gone through the tournament unbeaten, Australia saved their most complete performance of the 2003 World Cup for the final in Johannesburg. Sent in to bat by India skipper Sourav Ganguly, Adam Gilchrist and Matthew Hayden provided a lightning start before captain Ricky Ponting and Damien Martyn combined for a record partnership that all-but secured Australia’s third World Cup title.Ponting took 74 balls to reach his half-century, hitting just one boundary, before he unleashed an extraordinary attack in the final overs.“It had taken me about 70 balls to get to 50,” Ponting recalled recently. “And because the game was so under control and we were scoring quickly, I wanted to make sure I was there at the end.“The 12th man came out and I said, ‘Tell the boys to strap the seatbelts on, I’m gonna go flat-out from now and see what happens’.“I got most of them in the middle from there on in.”The skipper launched consecutive sixes off Harbhajan Singh in the 39th over before peeling off another six maximums in an impressive display of power hitting. He finished unbeaten on 140, with his second 90 runs coming from just 47 balls, while Martyn overcame a broken finger to finish on 88 not out from 84 deliveries.“As the captain, it was my turn to stand up and I walked off 140 not out, having shared (an Australian record) partnership with Damien Martyn at the time and posted 360 in a World Cup final.“You’re walking off there and you’re thinking, ‘Well that’s done, game over – we’ve stood up here’.”Former Australia coach John Buchanan said it was “one of the finest innings in World Cup history, given the situation”.“You’d go a long way to find better. As captain … leading by the front and leading by example, taking the attack, both to the spin and the quick bowlers of India … at the end of a long tournament. Probably hard to go past that one,” Buchanan said.Ponting and Martyn’s unbeaten stand of 234, which included 55 from the last four overs of the innings, remains a World Cup final record. While Ponting’s knock is rightly heralded, Ponting paid tribute to the often overlooked efforts by Martyn, who struck an unbeaten 88 from 84 deliveries – with a broken finger, no less.It was a knock Ponting believes showed “the other side” of the cavalier middle-order batsman’s character.“He had a badly broken finger but I was desperate for him to play because he’d played right the way through, he was an experienced player, and ‘Marto’ was one of those guys who, when things got toughest, he was at his best,” Ponting told The Howie Games podcast.“If you think about some of the Test tours to India and Sri Lanka where conditions were hard, he found a way and got it done.“Most people that looked at him and the way that he played, probably don’t see that side of him. They see the other side of him – the arrogance and the swagger and the class with the way that he played.“But they don’t see the other side of him very often.“I remember going to him a couple of days before the (final) and saying, ‘Look, needle it [his finger] for me today, get through training, I’ll watch you catch a few balls and hit a few balls, and then when you’ve finished, look me in the eye and tell me you can play, because I want you to play.’“The morning of the game I went to him and said, ‘Look me in the eye and tell me you can play’.“He looked at me and said, ‘I can play’.“He went out and played alright – he got 88 not out and it was a special moment in the career.”India’s faint hope of victory seemingly evaporated in the very first over of their run chase, when Glenn McGrath removed Sachin Tendulkar for just 4.A brilliant bowling display and some outstanding fielding eventually secured the win by 125 runs and Ponting celebrated the second of his three World Cup triumphs.Buchanan – who has the highest winning percentage of matches of any coach in both Test and ODI formats – said his entire squad played a part in the tournament victory.“One of the reasons why you win tournaments is the depth of the group that you have, everybody works together to achieve an end point. It was a good group and we achieved some special things,” Buchanan said. (Cricket Network)last_img read more

Read More →

British Open 2019: Brooks Koepka’s consolation is place in golf’s star-studded top-five

first_imgA closing 74 spoiled his weekend, after rounds of 68, 69 and 67 put the 29-year-old in the hunt for the Claret Jug.Before Koepka’s feat, Jordan Spieth was the last man to achieve the full house of top-five finishes when he won the Masters and U.S. Open in 2015 as well as enjoying strong runs at the Open and US PGA.Brooks Koepka becomes the 5th player to finish top-five in all four majors in a single seasonJordan Spieth/2015Rickie Fowler/2014Tiger Woods/2000/2005Jack Nicklaus/1971/1973— PGA TOUR Communications (@PGATOURComms) July 21, 2019Rickie Fowler, still yet to win a major, was a model of consistency in 2014, with two second places, a third and a fifth.Tiger Woods had three major wins in his 2000 season, plus a fifth place at the Masters, and in 2005 he triumphed at the Masters and Open Championship, while coming second at the U.S. Open and tying for fourth at the US PGA. Jack Nicklaus won the US PGA in 1971 and 1973, and in both seasons also bagged top-five finishes at the other majors.Despite joining such an elite club, Koepka was not impressed with his efforts at Portrush.”I don’t see much positive out of it,” he said after his final round. “If you don’t play good you’re not going to win. So it’s very simple. It’s disappointing, yes. I didn’t play the way I wanted to. And I’ve got to live with that.” Brooks Koepka’s Open challenge faded at Royal Portrush but the American still became just the fifth man to secure a top-five finish at every major in a single season.After finishing tied for second at the Masters, winning the US PGA Championship and claiming second outright at the U.S. Open, Koepka had to settle for a share of fourth on six under par in Northern Ireland, nine shots adrift of runaway winner Shane Lowry.last_img read more

Read More →