Speech: Focusing on children’s safety and a need for enhanced political process in Yemen

first_imgThank you Mr President and thank you to all our briefers.I’ll split my remarks if I may into what we heard from Mark and Martin and then what we’ve heard from Ms Gamba and from Muna Luqman but I think it was all very powerful. Thank you to Mark, Martin and General Lollesgaard, who we will hear from later, for their tireless efforts to push implementation of the agreements reached in Stockholm. I think Muna’s testimony was very powerful, but we know that the UN has been working very hard to get implementation. And I think I speak for everyone in the Council in saying the Council really wants to stay united behind you in pushing for that. The fact that you’ve got agreements to the concept of operations for Phase 1 as you say is helpful. I don’t think we underestimate the scale of the task. Martin, you referred to the fact that voluntary withdrawals would be the first time this has happened in the Yemeni context so we appreciate the scale of the task. But at the same time, we do want the parties to be aware that the lack of implementation is very worrying and we urge all the parties to put in place whatever steps need to be taken to get Stockholm implemented in full. And we also look to the parties to remove all the impediments to the UN’s ability to operate effectively in Hodeidah. And we’ll have a couple of questions to follow up on when we go into closed consultations.I wanted to turn to what Mark said; I think it’s shocking that we can’t get access to the Red Sea Mills after all this time. We were very hopeful after the last briefing but it’s very disappointing to hear that those obstacles still continue. And I just want to echo Mark’s call; if it’s possible for the grain to be salvaged, even at this late stage, then I think we look to the parties to redouble their efforts to work with the UN to ensure that can happen. I think obviously the figures Mark gave us about the 80 percent drop in humanitarian assistance in what we know is already the greatest humanitarian crisis in the world. The contrast between those two statements is extremely alarming and Mr President, I’m running out of superlatives to echo how worrying this is. There’s been some very welcome pledges from Saudi Arabia and the UAE and they have just announced disbursing $200 million of the pledges that they’ve made. But there’s still a $1.5 billion funding gap in the humanitarian response plan. For our part, we have pledged $300 million and we’ve brought forward our disbursement so we can support the UN. But I would like to encourage all donors today to disburse their funds rapidly and to pledge additional funds throughout the year.Turning to the very powerful testimonies we heard from the SRSG and from Ms Muna Luqman, thank you for putting the focus on children. Today is a very good moment to reflect quite how desperate the plight of children is in Yemen. And I just want to pay tribute also to the Belgium PR and his mission for all the work they have done on children in the Yemen conflict. We need to consider very carefully what you’ve told us. And we heard from Muna a very graphic account of what the continuing conflict means for individuals. And I think you’re quite right, Muna to hold the Council to account and to ask us to work with the UN to do more. So we will take that very seriously and we will do what we can.Finally, Mr President, I just wanted to end going back to the Stockholm Agreement. It was designed to build confidence and prepare the road for a comprehensive political process to end the conflict. That’s such an important goal. The stakes are too high for us to let that fail and the Council, in our view, Mr President, should be ready to take stronger measures if there’s no progress by our next meeting. And I’d like to follow that up in consultations, if I may. Thank you.last_img read more

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Students celebrate sweet victory

first_imgSeniors left Notre Dame Stadium on Saturday feeling content after the football team defeated Boston College 16-14. Though the Irish won by less than he expected, senior Matt Sushinsky said he was still happy with the outcome. “It is always nice to win, but I think we should have won by a lot more seeing as how we were playing Boston College. But a win is a win,” Sushinsky said. Participating in the traditional Senior Day marshmallow fight was especially enjoyable for Sushinsky. “The marshmallow fight was a lot of fun. It is nice that the seniors have a great tradition for their final home game,” Sushinsky said. “It did get a little messy, but I think we all had a blast.” Seniors rushed the field after the Irish victory, a tradition Sushinsky said meant a lot to him. “For all Notre Dame students, the field is a sacred place,” Sushinsky said. “Being able to go out there after the game and walk on the field where some of the greatest football players have played was a great finale to my four years here.  “It also was nice to touch the grass before they decide to get turf or something.” Senior Meghan Donoghue said a lackluster effort by the Irish did not hinder the football environment.  “[Saturday] definitely was not the best performance I have seen in my four years here,” Donoghue said. “However, I was caught up in the moment of this being my final time inside Notre Dame Stadium as a student, so I was not affected by the play on the field.” Donoghue said the atmosphere in the senior student section was amazing. “Being around fellow classmates made us all feel lucky to attend a school where there is so much camaraderie,” Donoghue said. “Needless to say, it was a great ending to our four-year football careers.” Senior Christina Carson echoed Donoghue’s feelings regarding the environment at the last home game. “All of the seniors rallied around the fact that it was the last home game,” Carson said. “There was tons of spirit which was cool.” Carson said going onto the field after the game was the highlight of the bittersweet weekend. “It was fun to get on the field after the game, although it was not as climactic as previous years,” Carson said.  Both Donoghue and Carson agreed that the Irish offense must show up in Palo Alto, Calif., on Saturday if the team is to have a chance of knocking off the Cardinal. “Stanford is a really good team,” Donoghue said. “Hopefully we can put on a good showing, but no matter the outcome, we have had a great run at it this year.” Carson reflected on the loss of senior running back Jonas Gray to injury. “The absence of [Jonas] Gray will significantly hurt our running game, but hopefully we will be able to put some points up on the board,” Carson said. Douglas Farmer contributed to this report.last_img read more

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September 1, 2005 Letters

first_img Letters JNC Process I couldn’t help but chuckle as I read the August 1 News article about the Judicial Independence Committee’s “exploration” of Florida’s JNC process.Several commentators in the article expressed concerns about the governor’s preference for six, rather than three, candidates for judicial vacancies, and suggested that a larger pool of candidates makes it less likely that the “best of the best” will be selected for judgeships.In truth, the governor’s changes to the JNC have simply reduced the power of a subset of Bar elites, who all too often concluded that the “best of the best” included only those whose views and backgrounds mirrored their own.The numbers speak for themselves. Since Gov. Bush took office and demanded changes, a record number of women and minorities have made it through the JNC process and joined the ranks of Florida’s judges. In addition, there has been a marked increase in the diversity of viewpoints represented on the bench. The governor should be praised for his leadership, not pilloried for politicizing the process. Reginald J. Brown Washington, D.C. Shakespeare Revisited “I hate attorneys” is an often heard refrain. There are those who always wish to share their kind words about attorneys with a Shakespearean quote: “The first thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers.” We are referred to as gunslingers or mouthpieces. What happened to counselors or advisors? These issues of perception and civility have troubled me over the years.We are supposed to be able to communicate a point of view. But what is the point of view we are to communicate? How society views what is right and what is wrong ultimately determines what attorneys will reflect back in their practice of law. It is the attitudes prevalent in a society which impact our legal system.Although we as professionals have our shortcomings and are not perfect, so it is the same with the society in which we practice. It is not perfect. We are influenced by society’s values. Can we create for society a better format for communication than currently exists? Absolutely. We have the ability to maintain civility with our colleagues. We have the opportunity to mediate and help people settle their differences in a more civil manner. We have the ability and knowledge to help change laws which are unfair, ineffective, or overly burdensome. We have the ability to advise people that a matter is not appropriate for litigation and that we will not handle the matter. We have the ability when on the bench to throw out a frivolous case. We have the ability to express our points of view and leave the door open for meaningful discussion without resorting to inappropriate behavior or coercive tactics.I know this is possible because I see the changes in attitude when parties so desire. Even in hostile litigation, counsel can rise above the bickering and communicate on a professional level. They can extend courtesies to opposing counsel so that the process can run smoothly and channels of communication can remain open. Attorneys do not have to be reflective of society’s norms. We can set the tone of how people can communicate on a civil basis, although they may have strong differences of opinion.It is sad that society forgets the intent of Shakespeare’s suggestion to kill all of the lawyers. No lawyers meant no one to protect against antisocial behavior. The statement was actually a compliment and acknowledgment of the important role lawyers play in maintaining law and order in a society.I am an attorney, and I am proud of being one who counsels and mediates. Michael Garlick Boca Raton The Name Game The “It is important to practice under your real name” UPL Update column in the August 15 News misstates the law and illustrates misplaced priorities.The author’s example is that a lawyer licensed as Cynthia R. Jones may not call herself Cindy Jones in her law practice. This contradicts the only formal authority we have in Florida on the subject, Florida Bar Ethics Opinion 74-20, which says, in pertinent part:“We do not believe that a William signing a letter Bill, a Henry signing a letter Hank, or a Francis signing as Frank is going to mislead anyone, particularly where his full name is set out on his letterhead, although we know of no rule absolutely requiring this.”There is simply no possible reasonable reading of Rule 1-3.3 that forbids, for example, use of a middle initial in a signature instead of spelling out an entire middle name or entirely omitting the middle name from the signature or using Jill instead of Jillian. The purpose is to prevent misleading identifications, not to nitpick at practices so universal that enforcement in accordance with this article would make offenders out of perhaps a majority of the members of the Bar.In presenting an overreaching and insupportable interpretation of an otherwise legitimate rule, this column invites resentment and the sense of harassment that fuels so much of the attack, in the legislature and elsewhere, on the Bar’s regulatory authority. Rick Johnson (a/k/a Richard Errol Johnson) Tallahassee( Bar UPL Counsel Lori Holcomb Responds: Mr. Johnson’s letter gives an example from an ethics opinion on how letters may be signed. I do not believe that the column contradicts the ethics opinion. It states that the nickname may be used “particularly where his full name is set out on his letterhead.” Someone seeing the letter would have the full name and be able to find the attorney in the Bar’s records.) September 1, 2005 Letters September 1, 2005 Letterslast_img read more

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Annual Mud Gaunlet has a different look this time around

first_img“Hopefully next year it will still be on the qualifying events,” he said. “Our obstacles don’t change, they are still high standard.” “This course has multiple difficulty level, but the hardest side for our elite people is as hard as it comes,” said Newby. For those that took part, the course still provided a challenge for those who took the plunge. “It is bitter sweet,” said said Newbsanity founder Jarrett Newby. “We normally have a few hundred people come up for the mud gauntlet.” The event still featured a wide range of people from all different age groups on a three-mile long obstacle course. The gauntlet was scheduled to be a qualifier for this years world championships, which Newby said was cancelled.center_img BINGHAMTON (WBNG) – In a summer where events throughout the Southern Tier were put on hold, the Newsbsanity Mud Gauntlet was a full go. Due to the coronavirus pandemic. Newby said this year’s gauntlet looked different from past ventures, featuring social distancing, spaced out start times, masks and other safety precautions. Newby told 12 News despite the adjustments to this year’s Mud Gauntlet, he still considered it a success.last_img read more

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USG unanimously passes Trojan Council resolution

first_imgUndergraduate Student Government President Trenton Stone presents his September updates to USG Tuesday night. During the meeting, senators unanimously passed a resolution to formally recognize Trojan Council, a coalition of University leaders. (Sasha Urban | Daily Trojan) The Undergraduate Student Government passed its first resolution of the semester Tuesday when senators unanimously voted to officially recognize Trojan Council, a coalition of USC’s four primary governing bodies — USG, Graduate Student Government, Academic Senate and Staff Assembly. Its first official event, an open University forum, will be held by the end of the semester, according to USG President Trenton Stone.  “I think that it would be great for the Concerned Faculty group to find ways to work more closely with the Academic Senate,” Stone said. “We all have different needs, but at the end of the day a lot of the needs overcross.”  Stone said the other three governing bodies, which meet less frequently than USG, are currently working on their own resolutions to officially recognize Trojan Council.  Stone said the presidents of each body were already meeting informally for the last two years, even organizing their own University forum last spring, which was open to students, faculty and staff members. He said he hopes that making the Council official will solidify its influence on campus as a centralized and collaborative advisory body.  “They have the most arcane election procedures,” Ariela Gross, the chair of Concerned Faculty, told the Daily Trojan in March. “So they have an executive board that does not represent their constituents.” Stone said in the past, the four governing bodies had typically met with administrators separately, even when addressing the same or similar topics. He said Trojan Council is already planning several presentations for this semester, in which administrators will speak to the coalition about select topics. Concerned Faculty of USC, a group formed last year in the wake of the scandal involving former campus gynecologist George Tyndall, has previously criticized the Academic Senate for not accurately representing faculty interests.  Stone said that while there is not currently a plan to include Concerned Faculty as an official part of the Council, he hopes that officially recognizing the coalition will address concerns across campus, including those of Concerned Faculty.  By officially recognizing the coalition, Stone said he hopes that administrators will be “more expected” to attend the planned forums. This semester, the forum will be attended by University President Carol Folt, incoming Provost Charles Zukoski and the inaugural Vice President for Human Resources Felicia Washington. All three administrators are new to their positions this year as part of a sweeping turnover of the University administration.  Stone believes Trojan Council is a step toward increasing transparency on campus and ensuring student representation at important discussions. Tuesday’s resolution comes in the wake of multiple developments in USC’s myriad scandals in the last few weeks. These include a pair of lawsuits between the University and two USC Village restaurants, revelations in the lawsuits against former campus men’s health doctor Dennis Kelly and court documents filed Tuesday that reveal new information about how donations allegedly affect admission to the University. “The hope is to encourage this idea that there’s now an officially endorsed governing collaborative group … to work together on shared issues, as well as plan this University forum,” Stone said.  “So now it’s not each of us going separately to their office,” Stone said. “But rather, they come in for 15 minutes, present to us and then we discuss it is a group. So I think it’s just a more effective way of working together on these common issues.”last_img read more

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Mourinho set to ring the changes for Southampton test

first_imgChelsea manager Jose Mourinho has hinted that he will ring the changes to his side when they welcome Southampton to Stamford Bridge on Saturday.A run of three straight victories for Jose Mourinho’s men came to an abrupt end with a 2-2 draw at struggling Newcastle United and a 2-1 defeat to Porto in the UEFA Champions League over the last week.And next up come a Saints side who have rediscovered their form after winning their last two matches, scoring nine goals in the process.Mourinho, therefore, has hinted at further changes on Saturday evening as he looks to return his side to winning ways.”There are rotations, we always try to do a little bit,” he said. “Mentally, it is important, physically it is important, but there is also a part of the rotation which is because of the instability of the performances.”If you play well for four or five matches you get stability, you keep the core. It is normal. If not, it is normal that you always try to find solutions and win the next game.”Mourinho, who has led his side to just eight points from seven matches, has never lost to Southampton in the BPL, although both of last season’s encounters ended in 1-1 draws. “They [Southampton] are a good team,” he said. “A team that last season we couldn’t beat in the two matches, although we know that we could have won them. We know why we couldn’t win.”The match at home we had unbelievable dominance but we respect them a lot. For sure, they are going to give us a difficult match.”Despite the champions’ struggles this season, Southampton defender Cedric Soares is in no doubt as to the Portuguese manager’s ability and is relishing the chance to play against one of England’s biggest sides.”Everybody knows that the qualities he [Mourinho] has, he is an amazing coach,” the 24-year-old told the Southern Daily Echo. “It will be a pleasure for me to play against him and for sure it will be a great game. “It is a big game and every player wants to play those big games. It is about football.”Big stadiums, big environment; you want to play that high level and Chelsea is one of the best teams, so everybody wants to play. We will do our best to win.”Despite their back-to-back wins Ronald Koeman’s side’s away form leaves room for improvement, with no league win on the road in 10 matches; a run only equalled by Newcastle United.The Dutchman will hope Graziano Pelle can continue to find the net scoring four goals in seven matches. Meanwhile, Chelsea do not have a single player who has scored more than one goal in the league.Striker Diego Costa is suspended and goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois (knee) is still a long-term absentee, while Southampton have been coping without Steven Caulker, Jordy Clasie, Fraser Forster and Florin Gardos. Chelsea (from): Begovic, Blackman, Azpilicueta, Cahill, Djilobodji, Ivanovic, Rahman, Terry, Zouma, Fabregas, Hazard, Loftus-Cheek, Matic, Mikel, Oscar, Ramires, Traore, Willian, Falcao, Kenedy, Pedro, Remy.Southampton (from): K Davis, Gazzaniga, Stekelenburg, Bertrand, Cedric, Fonte, Martina, McCarthy, Targett, Van Dijk, Yoshida, S Davis, Isgrove, Mane, McQueen, Ramirez, Reed, Romeu, Tadic, Wanyama, Ward-Prowse, Juanmi, Long, Pelle, Rodriguez.–Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @Joy997FM. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more

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LETTERKENNY BRANCH OF M&S TO OPEN AFTER STRIKE CALLED OFF

first_imgA planned one-day strike at Letterkenny Marks & Spencer tomorrow has been called off.Branches throughout the country were due to close.A spokesman for the Mandate trade union said the strike was deferred because of an emergency Labour Court hearing this Friday. Workers are angry at the closure of a defined-benefit pension scheme.Stores closed last Saturday as part of the industrial dispute.Friday’s talks are aimed at ending the row.   Advertisement LETTERKENNY BRANCH OF M&S TO OPEN AFTER STRIKE CALLED OFF was last modified: December 11th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:LETTERKENNY BRANCH OF M&S TO OPEN AFTER STRIKE CALLED OFFlast_img read more

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