Auctioneer has winning bid

first_imgThe four finalists in the REIQ Auctioneer of the Year, with winner Gavin Croft (front left)The competition saw a volley of more than 100 bids designed to test the competitors on their memory, maths, resilience and endurance. Scripted challenges came from a lawyer, who attempted to de-legitimise the auction on multiple occasions, and from an extremely litigious registered bidder whose winning bid was ultimately not accepted by the vendor.Auction chapter delegate, and author of the scripts, Peter Burgin said the goal was to create a realistic setting as well as testing the competitors’ legal and technical knowledge.“We wanted this competition to feel like a real-life auction, but also we wanted to make sure that the competitors had the knowledge and the understanding of the legislation that someone at this level should have,” he said.But in the end there could only be one winner and there was no love lost between Mr Croft and Mr Nickerson.“We’re people who tend to hang out a lot, so we get along,” Mr Nickerson said. “We’re all crazy in our own crazy ways.”Mr Croft and Mr Nickerson will now represent the REIQ at the Australasian Auctioneering Championships in 2019, when the REIQ will host the event. REIQ Auctioneer of the Year winner Gavin CroftJETSETTING auctioneer Gavin Croft has been named Auctioneer of the Year by the Real Estate Institute of Queensland.Mr Croft, who flies between Auckland, Sydney and Brisbane every week to call auctions, beat friend and 2017 winner Justin Nickerson for the top gong.“I think to come back to where I was born and bred, it’s a nice little award,” Mr Croft said.Mr Croft grew up in Queensland but has spent time in Sydney calling auctions for Bresic Whitney. He recently returned to the Sunshine State and will continue to call auctions in Sydney, Brisbane and New Zealand for Sotheby’s International.“Auckland and Sydney are really sophisticated markets,” he said. “The Sydney market expects high performance.“You sense things are changing, and starting to change quite quickly.“We saw that in eastern Sydney about 30 years ago, and we’re starting to see that here in Brisbane, hence why I am starting to spend a little more time in Brisbane.”Runner-up Justin Nickerson, who has won the title five times, will represent Queensland at the Australasian Auctioneering Championships in New Zealand this October with 2018 runner-up Mitch Peereboom (Ray White). He said Brisbane’s strength was its reliable and stable market.“I think the Brisbane market is seeing a lot of consistency,” Mr Nickerson said. “We haven’t had the huge dips.”It was a sentiment echoed by Mr Croft, who is Mr Croft is now only the second person to win an REI Auctioneer of the Year title in two states. He said Brisbane’s stability was in sharp contrast to behaviour witnessed at Sydney auctions.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus17 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market17 hours ago“People climbing over each other and so on. It was just an interesting experience,” he said. It was a tough battle between the top four contenders for the title, which included former REIQ Auctioneer of the Year (2015) Mark MacCabe (Apollo Auctions) and LJ Hooker national auction manager David Holmes.last_img read more

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NKT Victoria Starts Johan Sverdrup Power Cable Installation

first_imgStatoil has informed that the laying of the cable supplying Johan Sverdrup with power from shore has started.On Wednesday the cable laying vessel NKT Victoria began laying the cables that will supply the Johan Sverdrup field with power from shore.The starting point was the Johan Sverdrup converter station at Haugsneset near Kårstø, and by the end of May the vessel will have laid nearly 200 kilometers of power cables out to the field in the North Sea, the company said.“We are now laying the very lifeline of the Johan Sverdrup field, which will supply the field with power from shore for more than 50 years,” said Trond Bokn, senior vice president for Johan Sverdrup.The power cables will help make Johan Sverdrup one of the most carbon-efficient oil and gas fields in the world.Estimated at just 0.5 kg of CO2 per barrel, the emissions from Johan Sverdrup are about 20 times lower than the average on the Norwegian continental shelf, and 30 times lower than the international average.“The world is facing considerable challenges ensuring access to enough energy while doing so in a more climate-friendly way. Here Johan Sverdrup will play an important role: over the next 50 years, the field’s considerable reserves will be used to produce significant amounts of energy with low CO2 emissions,” Bokn said.The CO2 emissions avoided as a result of Johan Sverdrup using power from shore add up to more than 400,000 tonnes of C02 per year, equivalent to the emissions of some 200,000 cars each year.Several additional measures have been implemented to further reduce emissions during the Johan Sverdrup development. The cable-laying vessel NKT Victoria was designed to be supplied with power from shore while in harbour.The mobile accommodation vessel ‘Haven’, in use at the field from June onwards, has also been modified to utilize power from shore while in service at the Johan Sverdrup field.“We’ve worked systematically to take advantage of the opportunities which the power from shore solution has given us. As a result, I believe we’ve been able to reduce the carbon emissions from the field to the minimum,” said Geir Bjaanes, responsible for subsea, power and pipelines for the Johan Sverdrup project.“Before we get to that stage, however, we need to stay focused on the hectic installation period ahead of us. For the next three weeks or so we will be laying almost 10 kilometres of cables every single day. We have spent much time together with NKT preparing for this, but this will put our skills to the real test, our number one priority being safety and ensuring high quality in execution,” added Bjaanes.After the cables reach the Johan Sverdrup field at the end of May, the next step will be to pull the cables in to the riser platform, where the converter station for the first phase of the development is located.Then the cables will be connected, before preparations and testing of the system start. And in the autumn of 2018, the Johan Sverdrup field should be ready to be powered with electricity from shore.After the start-up of the second phase of the development in 2022, the Johan Sverdrup field will also enable power from shore to reach the remaining fields on the Utsira High – Edvard Grieg, Gina Krog and Ivar Aasen.last_img read more

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