PFA, PensionDanmark lift H1 returns with all asset classes positive

first_imgIn the first half of this year, the bond portfolio produced around 5% in return, PFA said.“This was particularly due to the foreign bonds, which represent a total value of well over DKK100 billion in the portfolio,” it said.Overall, assets dipped to DKK411.2bn at the end of June from DKK417.5bn at the end of December.PFA said the gains in foreign bonds were mainly due to its exposure to emerging markets and underlying, strong-performing portfolios, which yielded almost 7% during the first six months of 2014. On top of this, the falling level of interest rates during the first half had led to positive returns on bonds and interest rate hedging, it said.Equities returned around 9.5%, it said, mainly due to the focus on Danish shares, which increased by more than 20% in the period.Alternative investments had grown by more than 10% in the first half, it said, adding that it was increasingly investing in non-listed companies now.Property generated around 4.3%, it said.The pension provider’s investment returns translated into a return of between 5.5% and 7.5% for customers with unit link pensions, compared to an average rate of 2.3% in the same period last year, according to the interim report.Customers with traditional with-profits pensions would get an 8.0% return compared with a 2.2% loss in the first half of 2013.Meanwhile, labour-market pension fund PensionDanmark posted a first half return of DKK9.9bn —higher than the entire 2013 return of DKK9.1bn, and beating the DKK2.2bn return generated in the first six months of last year.The 2014 first half investment return led to scheme member returns of between 6.5% and 6.6%, the pension fund said, adding that these returns had increased since the end of June to 8.3% and 8.4%.Torben Möger Pedersen, chief executive of PensionDanmark, said: “This is a satisfactory result, which reflects the fact that there have been positive returns on all asset classes.”He said it was unusual in markets to have rising equities prices and falling interest rates at the same time.“We are trying to put together a balanced portfolio that can do well both when the sun shines and when it rains,” he said.Contributions had increased in the January-to-June period to DKK6.8bn from DKK5.2bn, PensionDanmark said, boosted mostly by DKK1.8bn of transfers from other pension funds due to job changes.Total assets increased to DKK165bn at the end of June from DKK152bn at the end of December. Denmark’s PFA reported an investment return of DKK24.7bn (€3.3bn) for the first half of the year, bouncing back from the DKK4.9bn loss it booked in the same period a year ago, with results boosted by a high proportion of foreign bonds.The results came as PensionDanmark also published half-year results that saw investment income for the first six months outstrip income from all of 2013.PFA, the commercial mutual pensions provider said: “This year, PFA obtained its historic high return based on its successful interpretation of the markets on several fronts.”The provider has explained the loss recorded in the first half of 2013 by saying it had not recognised the operational risk charge due to the increase in interest rates during the reporting period.last_img read more

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Euthanasia Bill risks are too great – expert

first_imgNewsHub 27 April 2018Family First Comment: Dear David Seymour, anyone who claims assisted dying already happens in New Zealand is peddling fake news.Yep!www.protect.org.nzAnyone who claims assisted dying already happens in New Zealand is peddling fake news, a palliative care expert says.A panel of specialists says the End of Life Bill going through Parliament is dangerous and the burden on doctors to assist a patient to die is too great.Dr Selina Lupati is a palliative medicine specialist and says the risks in the Bill – or any legislation around assisted dying – are too great.She says the Bill is asking doctors to make decisions that are irreversible, with less rigour than is applied to imprisoning someone in the justice system.“Medicine is not an exact science – we make mistakes in making diagnosis, we make mistakes in prognostication.”She is part of a panel of those working in palliative care who say public debate has been dominated by euthanasia advocates – and glossed over obvious flaws in the proposed law.Aged Concern reports 1500 cases of elder abuse and says 75 percent of alleged abusers are family members.READ MORE: http://www.newshub.co.nz/home/health/2018/04/euthanasia-bill-risks-are-too-great-expert.htmlKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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Sayer weathers injuries to earn vacated goalie spot

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 19, 2010 at 12:00 pm Commentscenter_img Rachel Sayer isn’t normal. And Syracuse field hockey head coach Ange Bradley means that in the most complimentary way possible. After Sayer injured her knee two months ago for the second time since joining SU in December, it would have been ordinary to limit herself until the end of the season, when doctors told her she might be healthy again. It would have been expected of Sayer to be content cheering her team on from the sideline. She wasn’t. The freshman goalkeeper trained as hard as she could, putting in as much grueling work as possible with the intention of being ready and healthy before the end of the season. And in the week before SU’s game at Albany, Sayer heard what she had been waiting to hear since she graduated a semester early from high school. She had earned the starting goalkeeper spot for the Orange.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text ‘I was excited, and I couldn’t wait to get back onto the field,’ Sayer said. ‘I hadn’t played in almost a year, and coming back from injuries are never easy, but doing rehab and training got me back where I needed to be. This is what I live for. This is my sport. So being out on the field was just great.’ Sayer’s start came after Bradley deactivated four starters for undisclosed reasons, including sophomore goalkeeper Leann Stiver. But Bradley said Sayer rightfully won the job. Despite the controversy surrounding the Orange, Sayer’s performance has proved she is capable of playing for a Top 10 program. The freshman goalkeeper has put up ‘spectacular’ results, her teammates said, picking up the first three wins of her young career and holding two ranked opponents to a combined two goals. Her contribution has been essential in a key stretch of the season. ‘Rachel is an outstanding competitor,’ Bradley said. ‘I knew she always had that mental toughness in her, but unfortunately she was plagued by injuries last spring. Everything she’s worked for and had taken away from her was just there, and she celebrated that moment.’ Though that moment was earned through her intense training, the physical rehab she had to go through nearly eliminated the true reason she arrived early to Syracuse. Sayer wanted to get a jump on the tough transition to the college game, but her injuries diverted much of her focus to simply getting healthy enough to play. Sayer said one of the biggest casualties of her redirected concentration was the ability to constantly communicate with her defense. But like every other obstacle she has encountered as a member of the Orange, she has been working hard to overcome it. ‘There are different methods of communication, but all of the goalies that we have on our team (have been able to) communicate well with the defense,’ sophomore back Iona Holloway said. ‘I think she did so well for her first starts of the season.’ Though the isolation of her extensive workouts rarely gave her the opportunity to build that chemistry with her defense, she credits the encouragement and support of her teammates with the fact that she was healthy two weeks earlier than expected. Normally, a player with Sayer’s injuries wouldn’t have been cleared to play until there was a week to go in the season. Ordinarily, a player with no previous college experience couldn’t shut down two ranked opponents away from home. But even in the face of a dire late-season changeup for her team, Bradley was expecting Sayer to act normal in her debut all along. ‘She has perseverance, and she knows how special it is to be out on the field,’ Bradley said. ‘I think that says so much for someone who takes advantage of an opportunity. That’s a winner, and I’m proud to be standing with her and next to her.’ [email protected]last_img read more

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