5 former rebels surrender, get gov’t assistance

first_imgThe firearms, which included two .38caliber, one .45 caliber, one shotgun, and an M1 garand rifle, were alsopresented to Defensor. A remaining 184 rebels in IloiloProvince are being monitored by the army, according to Sison. (LHC, Capitol News/PN) Sison said the returnees were formerlyconnected with the Communist Party of the Philippines-New People’s Army(CPP-NPA) and among the 10 total rebels who surrendered last year. Each also received a maximum ofP70,000 for their surrendered firearm. Each returnee received P15,000immediate assistance and P60,000 livelihood assistance under the government’sEnhanced Comprehensive Local Integration Program (E-CLIP). ILOILO – Five former rebels fromCalinog and Lambunao towns received financial aid after returning to the foldof the law and surrendering their firearms. “We want to let them know that thegovernment has programs in helping them start anew,” Sison said. The Department of Social Welfare andDevelopment is in-charge of monitoring the progress of their livelihoodprojects. Gov. Arthur Defensor Jr. assistedPhilippine Army’s 301st Brigade commander Colonel Marion Sision and Departmentof the Interior and Local Government (DILG-Iloilo) provincial director TeodoraSumagaysay in distributing the checks on Jan. 16 at the Governor’s Office.last_img read more

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Syracuse men’s soccer ties No. 8 Clemson in national semifinal rematch

first_img Published on October 21, 2016 at 10:47 pm Contact Matt: [email protected] | @matt_schneidman Just like in the College Cup semifinal, neither Syracuse nor Clemson mustered a goal in 110 minutes. This time, there were no penalty kicks to determine which team advanced to the national championship.Chances were few and far between on Friday night as both sides managed just two shots on goal, but a late acrobatic save by Syracuse goalkeeper Hendrik Hilpert preserved his eighth shutout of the season in No. 6 Syracuse’s (10-3-2, 3-2-2 Atlantic Coast) scoreless draw with No. 8 Clemson (9-2-4, 3-1-3) at Historic Riggs Field in Clemson, South Carolina.“No penalties this year, which was probably good for everybody,” SU head coach Ian McIntyre said. “These are fun games to be involved in. It’s a little bit helter-skelter. I think there probably could’ve been a little bit more quality in the 110 minutes.”SU and the Tigers are the top two teams in the ACC in terms of fouls committed, and both surpassed their season averages by committing 16 and 19, respectively. Syracuse’s Mo Adams, who has started every game thus far and scored his first-career goal against Hartford on Tuesday, will miss SU’s regular season finale due to suspension after picking up his fifth yellow card of the season.The game was scrappy, and despite Syracuse dominating possession it wasn’t able to generate the chances it has on such a consistent basis. The Orange’s lone shot on goal in regulation was a soft header by Johannes Pieles that fell gently into the hands of Clemson goalkeeper Ximo Miralles.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn the second overtime period, Hilpert came well off his line to clear a ball out of bounds, which he drilled right into the Clemson bench. He sprinted back to his net and on the next sequence made a diving save with his right hand on a near-post strike from Michael Melvin.“Collectively we defended extremely well,” McIntyre said. “To come on the road to a place like this and keep a clean sheet is terrific.”Syracuse’s draw kept it behind four other teams in the ACC standings with only the top four getting a bye in the upcoming conference tournament.The only team remaining on the Orange’s regular season schedule is No. 2 Wake Forest. Against the other four top-15 teams in the ACC the Orange has played, Syracuse has one goal combined.“It’s so difficult to get points in this league,” McIntyre said. “…I know that we have goals in this team.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Wolfowitz says he’ll resign from World Bank post

first_img People close to the negotiations said Wolfowitz agreed not to make major personnel or policy decisions between now and June 30. Some bank officials said he might go on an administrative leave and cede day-to-day functions to an acting leader, but that may not be decided until today. President George W. Bush earlier in the day praised Wolfowitz at a news conference but signaled that the end was near by saying he regretted “that it’s come to this.” A White House spokesman, Tony Fratto, said in the evening: “We would have preferred that he stay at the bank, but the president reluctantly accepts his decision.” More important for the bank’s future, Fratto said Bush would soon announce a candidate to succeed Wolfowitz, quashing speculation that the United States would go along with an end to the custom, in effect since the 1940s, of the American president picking the bank president. Many European officials previously indicated they would go along with the United States’ picking a successor if Wolfowitz would resign voluntarily, as he now has. Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson Jr. said Thursday evening that he would “consult my colleagues around the world” before recommending a choice to Bush – an apparent effort to assure European allies that the United States would not repeat what happened in 2005 when Bush surprised them by naming Wolfowitz, then a deputy secretary of defense and an architect of the Iraq war. Bitter taste Leaders of Germany and France objected but decided not to make a fight over the choice and risk reopening wounds from their opposition to the war two years earlier. Some also argued that Wolfowitz, as a conservative seeking to write a new chapter in a career that had been focused on national security, might bring new support to aiding the world’s poor. Soon after Wolfowitz took office, however, he engaged in fights in various quarters at the bank over issues including his reliance on a small group of aides and his campaign against corruption, in which he suspended aid to several countries without consulting board members. Wolfowitz’s resignation, while ending the turmoil that erupted in early April over the disclosure of his role in arranging Riza’s pay and promotion package, will not by itself repair the divisions at the bank over his leadership, bank officials said Thursday evening. By all accounts, the terms of Wolfowitz’s exoneration left a bitter taste with most of the 24 board members, who represent major donor countries, as well as clusters of smaller donor and recipient countries. Most had wanted to adopt the findings of the special board committee that determined he had acted unethically on the matter of Riza. Cited his work In the carefully negotiated statement, the bank board praised Wolfowitz for his two years of service, particularly for his work in arranging debt relief and pressing for more assistance to poor countries, especially in Africa. They also cited his work in combating corruption, Wolfowitz’s signature issue. Wolfowitz said he was grateful for the directors’ decision and, referring to the bank’s mission of helping the world’s poor, added: “Now it is necessary to find a way to move forward. To do that I have concluded that it is in the best interests of those whom this institution serves for that mission to be carried forward under new leadership.” Wolfowitz’s negotiated departure averted what threatened to become a bitter rupture between the United States and its economic partners at an institution established after World War II that channels $22 billion in loans and grants a year to poor countries. But he left behind an agency that must heal its divisions and overhaul a flawed, cumbersome structure that had allowed the controversy to spread out of control. “It’s come to this” WASHINGTON – Paul D. Wolfowitz, ending a furor over favoritism that blew up into a global fight over American leadership, announced his resignation as president of the World Bank Thursday evening after the bank’s board accepted his claim that his mistakes at the bank were made in good faith. The decision came four days after a special investigative committee of the bank concluded that he had violated his contract by breaking ethical and governance rules in arranging the generous pay and promotion package for Shaha Ali Riza, his companion, in 2005. The resignation, effective June 30, brought a dramatic conclusion to two days of negotiations between Wolfowitz and the bank board after weeks of turmoil. “He assured us that he acted ethically and in good faith in what he believed were the best interests of the institution, and we accept that,” said the board’s directors in a statement issued Thursday night. “We also accept that others involved acted ethically and in good faith.” last_img read more

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