Policy paper: COVID-19: Jobs with testing travel exemptions

first_imgEntering the UK Travel corridorsTravel corridors are suspended.Anyone who is not exempt will need to quarantine for 10 days on arrival in the UK.Restrictions in the UK If you have been in a country on the travel ban red list in the 10 days before you arrive, you have to quarantine in a government approved hotel.Travel from EnglandYou are only allowed to travel abroad if you have a legally permitted reason to do so.Anyone travelling abroad from England must complete a form to declare their legally permitted reason for overseas travel.Jobs that qualify for travel exemptionsSome people don’t have to do some of the above things, because of the jobs they do.This guidance lists the jobs that qualify for an exemption and tells people: LegislationThis guidance provides a high level summary of the international travel regulations. On arrival take a coronavirus test complete a passenger locator form what they need to do, or not do any conditions they will need to meet or evidence they will need to show Once in the UK, you must follow any local or national restrictions: To help protect the country from coronavirus (COVID-19), people travelling to the UK must do the following:Before travel to the UK national lockdown in England national restrictions in Northern Ireland local protection levels in Scotland  travel: Coronavirus in Wales quarantine for 10 days take a coronavirus test on day 2 and day 8 of their quarantinelast_img read more

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Steel industry sees severe drop in demand amid pandemic

first_imgTopics : However, he was optimistic that conditions would improve in time.A Moody’s Investors Service report published on April 7 states that the coronavirus outbreak “exacerbates the already challenging operating environment for steelmakers around the world”.The broad macroeconomic weakness spreading in the wake of the pandemic is driving down demand for steel in core industries like manufacturing, automotive, construction, and oil and gas exploration, the report reads.The steel industry is one of the country’s strategic upstream industries, as it provides raw materials for infrastructure, manufacturing, transportation and defense, among other sectors.South East Asia Iron and Steel Institute (SEAISI) data show that steel consumption in Indonesia rose 11 percent to 15.1 million tons in 2018. However, the demand is largely served by imports from China and other countries.This year, imports of iron and steel, accounting for 6.26 percent of Indonesia’s total non-oil and gas imports, dropped 23 percent year-on-year from January to March at US$2.12 billion, according to Statistics Indonesia (BPS).With the current downturn, local steelmakers expressed worries over the inconsistent implementation of Indonesia’s trade barrier policy, fearing that foreign products would continue dominating the local scene. China, for example, has continued to produce steel despite slow demand, swelling inventories and falling prices.In response to these concerns, Dini Hanggandari, the Industry Ministry’s metal industry director, said during the roundtable discussion that, “in order to control imports, we have used every official tool within the World Trade Organization’s corridors”. Indonesia had made it mandatory for imported steel products, such as zinc-coated steel, to comply with the national industrial standards (SNI), a policy permitted by the WTO. Dini said the ministry had also been pushing for trade remedies to be implemented for upstream and downstream steel products.State-Owned Enterprises Deputy Minister Budi Gunadi Sadikin urged local players in the steel industry to up their efficiency and productivity to better compete with global players. “On one hand the COVID-19 pandemic is causing dangers, but on the other hand, there are opportunities,” he said.He urged steelmakers to tap into unexplored opportunities, such as supplying the demand to produce hypodermic needles for the healthcare sector. “[The drop] is very pronounced at the retail front. There’s a decrease in people’s purchasing power and businesses are holding off purchasing plans,” the company’s vice president director, Tedja Sukmana Hudianto, said at a steel industry roundtable event on Wednesday.Fellow steelmaker PT Sampurna Jaya Baja reported a grimmer condition, as its sales nosedived 90 percent in May, a steeper plunge compared to losses of 50 to 60 percent in March and April.“The company’s cash flow is disrupted because the majority of our clients are closed for business. This renders things difficult because if this carries on, it could threaten the continuity of the company,” PT Sampurna Jaya Baja representative Raharjo Rudy Cahyono said.State-owned company PT Krakatau Steel president director Silmy Karim, who is also the chairman of the Indonesian Iron and Steel Industry Association (IISIA), confirmed that the pandemic had crippled the nationwide demand for steel products by 50 percent.center_img Steelmakers are facing severe blows to their business with demand during the COVID-19 pandemic having decreased by 90 percent from normal times.The low demand is partially due to the large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) imposed by the government to contain the virus, which has led to the closure of businesses, including major steel-consuming businesses in the automotive and construction industries.Steelmaker PT Steel Pipe Industry of Indonesia (Spindo), for example, saw demand for steel pipe products drop 30 percent in April and almost 50 percent in May.last_img read more

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New seminar examines entertainment industry

first_imgThe Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies will offer a new seminar in entrepreneurship in the spring focused on the entertainment industry. The two-unit course will expose students to multiple aspects of the field and provide them with the tools necessary to establish their own successful venture.Adjunct Professor Michael Napoliello of the Marshall School of Business hopes to attract students from different departments and schools within USC. He has designed the course to encompass various facets of the entertainment industry, including cinema, music and sports. By recruiting a diverse group of students, Napoliello aims to encourage cross-collaboration and facilitate engaging class discussions.“The class is not just for business school students,” Napoliello said. “By having a mix of entertainers and specialists and business people and entrepreneurs, we hope to create some exciting synergies.”Napoliello, a producer at independent production company Radar Pictures, will teach students the fundamentals necessary to succeed within the dynamic, fast-paced climate of the entertainment industry. Students will analyze trends throughout history and learn how to respond to modern-day challenges in the digital age.“Some of the things we’re going to discuss is how to anticipate next steps, when next steps are always so important,” Napoliello said. “We are going to try to understand the future, but we’re also going to look for the timeless values that make people in the entertainment industry successful.”Napoliello said the seminar is pertinent to USC students because of the university’s strategic location within Los Angeles. The course will feature a field trip and guest lectures from people involved in diverse aspects of the industry, such as marketing, production and sales.“We have access to the most important people and places in the entertainment industry, and we are going to take advantage of that,” Napoliello said.The director of the Greif Center, Helena Yli-Renko, proposed the idea for the course in response to student demands.“We get a lot of students from across campus who are excited to do something entrepreneurial in the entertainment field,” Yli-Renko said. “It was a coming together of student demand and a really terrific faculty resource that enabled us to offer this really unique new opportunity for students.”Though the majority of students who pursue seminars in entrepreneurship are non-business majors, Yli-Renko said the course will attract more arts students than in semesters past.Napoliello described the entertainment industry as one of mavericks and innovators, an ideal environment for newcomers and professionals alike to learn and develop new ideas.“Entertainment entrepreneurship is one area where we’re all figuring it out as we go along, everyday, students included,” Napoliello said. “Ultimately, the entertainment industry is a really exciting place to learn entrepreneurship because it’s been entrepreneurial from day one, is entrepreneurial today and will continue to be entrepreneurial.”last_img read more

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