Gary Clark Jr. Announces 2019 Tour Dates Including 3-Night Runs In NYC, Nashville

first_imgToday, modern blues-rock torch-bearer Gary Clark Jr. has announced a lengthy batch of 2019 tour dates. The tour announcement comes in the wake of last month’s news that Clark is preparing to release an as yet unnamed new album next year.Gary Clark Jr.’s newly announced run of dates will begin on March 9th at the Jackie Gleason Theater in Miami, FL, followed by a performance in Tampa the following night. Next, Clark will head to Springfield, MO (3/13) before landing in the Windy City for a two-night run at the Chicago Theatre (3/15, 3/16).After stops in Indianapolis (3/18) and Pittsburgh (3/20), the Austin, TX native will head to New York City for a three-night stand at the historic Beacon Theatre (3/21, 3/22, 3/23) followed by a two-night stine at Boston’s House of Blues (3/26, 3/27). From there, Gary Clark Jr. will continue down the east coast to Philadelphia, PA (3/29); Washington, D.C. (3/30); Richmond, VA (3/31); Durham, NC (4/2); and Charlotte, NC (4/3). Finally, Clark will head to Nashville, TN’s storied Ryman Auditorium for a three-night stint to cap the spring swing.The dates were shared along with the previously released teaser video for his new album. In the video, the guitarist runs down the ways in which various genres had an effect on his sound on the new album over clips of its recording process and endorsements of Clark and his eclectic musical sensibilities from a variety of outlets and influential people like Rolling Stone, The Washington Post, Alicia Keys, Prince, and Barack Obama.As one quote from Rolling Stone notes, “Owing as much to Kurt Cobain and The Ramones as Buddy Guy and John Lee Hooker… indebted to hip-hop and psychedelia, [Clark] is grounded in tradition while standing on the brink of change.”As Clark explains in a voice-over, “When I started off on the record, it was really about the drums. If the drums aren’t poppin’, you’re wasting your time.” He continues, “I got all the colors, I’ma paint with all of them. … My punk edge comes from really just wanting to be a punk. Reggae influence? Yes. It goes back to that fusion thing. … When I was growing up, a lot of music venues played lots of different types of music every night. A lot of influences. A lot of stuff going on. It’s in what I do, I guess. … I’m not gonna give you my whole recipe, but the only person who can put rules on it is yourself.”Watch the teaser video for the upcoming new Gary Clark Jr. album below. For more information on the new album and upcoming tour dates, head to Clark’s website.Gary Clark Jr. New Album Teaser Video[Video: garyclarkjr] Gary Clark Jr. 2019 Tour DatesMar 09 Miami, FL Fillmore Miami Beach at The Jackie Gleason TheaterMar 10 Tampa, FL Gasparilla Music FestivalMar 13 Springfield, MO Gillioz TheatreMar 15 Chicago, IL Chicago Theatre presented by ChaseMar 16 Chicago, IL Chicago Theatre presented by ChaseMar 18 Indianapolis, IN Old National Centre – Murat TheatreMar 20 Pittsburgh, PA Benendum CenterMar 21 New York City, NY Beacon Theatre presented by ChaseMar 22 New York City, NY Beacon Theatre presented by ChaseMar 23 New York City, NY Beacon Theatre presented by ChaseMar 26 Boston, MA House of BluesMar 27 Boston, MA House of BluesMar 29 Philadelphia, PA Met Opera HouseMar 30 Washington, DC The AnthemMar 31 Richmond, VA The NationalApr 02 Durham, NC Durham PACApr 03 Charlotte, NC The Fillmore CharlotteApr 05 Nashville, TN Ryman AuditoriumApr 06 Nashville, TN Ryman AuditoriumApr 07 Nashville, TN Ryman AuditoriumView Newly Announced Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Annual Mud Gaunlet has a different look this time around

first_img“Hopefully next year it will still be on the qualifying events,” he said. “Our obstacles don’t change, they are still high standard.” “This course has multiple difficulty level, but the hardest side for our elite people is as hard as it comes,” said Newby. For those that took part, the course still provided a challenge for those who took the plunge. “It is bitter sweet,” said said Newbsanity founder Jarrett Newby. “We normally have a few hundred people come up for the mud gauntlet.” The event still featured a wide range of people from all different age groups on a three-mile long obstacle course. The gauntlet was scheduled to be a qualifier for this years world championships, which Newby said was cancelled.center_img BINGHAMTON (WBNG) – In a summer where events throughout the Southern Tier were put on hold, the Newsbsanity Mud Gauntlet was a full go. Due to the coronavirus pandemic. Newby said this year’s gauntlet looked different from past ventures, featuring social distancing, spaced out start times, masks and other safety precautions. Newby told 12 News despite the adjustments to this year’s Mud Gauntlet, he still considered it a success.last_img read more

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Rescued owl ‘too fat to fly’ – sanctuary

first_imgThis owl is put on a “strict diet” to lose 20 to 30 grams. SUFFOLK OWL SANCTUARY When staff examined the little owl (Athene noctua), they found it to be“simply extremely obese” and “unable to fly effectively” as a result. The owl was put on a “strict diet” toslim down from its 245 grams to a more “natural weight” and has been releasedback to the wild, the sanctuary said. The sanctuary said it was “extremelyunusual for wild birds to get into this condition naturally.” “We may see her again – we hope not,”said Samkin. “Hopefully, she’s learnt to keep her weight in trim so she canescape any predators or being picked up.” (BBC) Head falconer Rufus Samkin said, “Whereshe was found is very productive land, and it’s been a mild winter and there’sa lot of food around – voles, mice. “We think she’s just done incredibly wellfor herself and overindulged.” AN owl rescued from a ditch and thoughtto be injured was in fact just too fat to fly, a bird rescue center said. The sanctuary, based in Stonham Aspal,said when the bird was weighed, it was roughly three times heavier than theywould expect a large healthy female little owl to be. He said the owl lost between 20 to 30 gramsover a couple of weeks while staff monitored its food intake. Suffolk Owl Sanctuary said the “soggy”bird was brought in by a landowner.last_img read more

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Cincinnati fentanyl subject of Columbus investigation

first_imgChandler B. GoodardBradley A. McRaeHartsville, In. —After a lengthy narcotics investigation, two Columbus residents suspected of bringing fentanyl and heroin from out of state and selling it locally were arrested after their vehicle was stopped on Friday afternoon.During the investigation, Joint Narcotics Enforcement Team detectives determined that Chandler B. Goddard, 20, of Columbus and Bradley A. McRae, 23, of Columbus made multiple trips to Cincinnati, Ohio where they purchased heroin and fentanyl.  The pair then brought the drugs back to Bartholomew County where it was sold.JNET detectives were able to secure arrest warrants for Goddard and McRae on charges of dealing in a narcotic drug.  Their vehicle was stopped near Hartsville by officers from the Bartholomew County Sheriff’s Department as well as the Columbus Police Department’s Intelligence Led Policing Unit.  Goddard and McRae were taken into custody at the scene without incident.  A Bartholomew County Sheriff’s canine later alerted to the odor of narcotics inside the vehicle driven by McRae.  During a search of the vehicle, officers located fentanyl inside Goddard’s purse.JNET investigators also secured a search warrant after transporting Goddard to Columbus Regional Hospital.  After the warrant was served, the hospital medical staff recovered a quarter ounce of fentanyl that Goddard concealed in a body cavity.Goddard and McRae have been charged with dealing in a narcotic drug, possession of narcotics, possession of marijuana and possession of paraphernalia. This is an ongoing investigation.last_img read more

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Donald Pollitt uses diet, trash talk, experience to prepare for final season for Syracuse

first_img Published on March 25, 2015 at 12:06 am Contact Sam: [email protected] | @Sam4TR Facebook Twitter Google+ Donald Pollitt knew he was behind before he even started.He didn’t execute well out of the blocks, causing a delayed reaction. Instead of being with the field, he was behind. He was trying to play catch-up rather than just leading the pack.Pollitt finished second in the 60-meter hurdles at the Atlantic Coast Conference Championship meet at Virginia Tech on Feb. 27 with a time of 7.85 seconds — 0.03 seconds slower than the qualify time for the national championships.Syracuse assistant coach Dave Hegland thought he got unlucky, just a bad day to have a bad day. After a performance like that, Pollitt didn’t need a pep-talk, he said.“It’s just upsetting. That’s all it is,” Pollitt said. “I never want to have that feeling again.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textPollitt has been fueled by his previous failure as he trains for outdoor track and field. A senior who is running his final season for Syracuse, he’s improving with the help of constant trash-talk from teammates, a re-focused diet and a new perspective.His dedication to his routines earned him the team’s Most Valuable Player award last season, and he wants to prove he’ll earn it this season.“Even in practice, (Donald’s) striving to be great,” teammate Reggie Morton said. “He pushes everyone. He talks trash all the time, but it keeps long practices fun.”Morton, Pollitt and Freddie Crittenden are roommates and their trash talk flows effortlessly from Call of Duty on the PlayStation at home to drills in Manley Field House.In scramble circuit, a drill in which runners do multiple aerobic exercises then sprint 10 meters, Pollitt pushes his teammates.It’s the same competitive nature in a 20-yard dash between cones — part of an 80-meter fly — where Morton and Pollitt both run around 1.90 seconds where the trash talk really comes out.If someone beats him, Pollitt said, they get in his face. “Oh, what’s up, Donald? You see that time? That used to be your record.”As one runner pushes the other two, the group becomes stronger as they perpetually try to out-do one another. They keep tally marks in their heads, each guy thinking he has more than his teammate.“Every day I see him here, he’s hungry,” Crittenden said. “Everybody’s hungry.”For Pollitt, sometimes he has to battle that craving.He cuts out junk food, juice and pasta — though once every three weeks he allows himself a cookie, or a bite of chocolate.For every breakfast he eats oatmeal and yogurt, lunch is eggs and fruit. Dinner consists of fruit, vegetables, a small carbohydrate portion and protein — chicken, fish, steak, beef or pork.He wakes up at 8:30 every morning and is asleep by 10:30 at night, ensuring the most rest for the best recovery. He sleeps, on average, 9 to 10 hours per night.“Besides classes and practice, I don’t break my routine,” he said. “I try to keep it as simple as possible.”In his last season, Pollitt is enjoying preparation for outdoor track, mostly because he simply enjoys it more.In high school, indoor track wasn’t offered, so he trained for outdoor throughout the winter. Indoor track is also shorter — five, 60-meter hurdles — than outdoor, which is 110-meters and 10 hurdles.It’s this event he enjoys — coupled with the fact that this is his last season — which has Pollitt adopting a new strategy.He wants to be reckless and aggressive. Attack. Hold nothing back.He physically has a longer race to run, but his time at Syracuse is dwindling down. He doesn’t want his last race to finish like it did at Virginia Tech.“Given that ACCs didn’t go the way I wanted it to go, it’s definitely going to throw fuel on the fire, put a chip on my shoulder,” Pollitt said. “It’ll always be in the back of my mind, pushing me.” Commentslast_img read more

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Business association leader says supply issues main concern right now

first_imgDES MOINES — Many businesses across Iowa are encouraging or ordering employees to work from home indefinitely, but it’s not an option for many of us, especially factory workers.Mike Ralston, president of the Iowa Association of Business and Industry, says he’s not aware of any major factory closures in the state due to coronavirus, but it’s certainly having a chilling effect on commerce.“The biggest impact for Iowa manufacturers so far is not that they have to close their doors, but that they’re experiencing issues involving their supply chain,” Ralston says. “Maybe they work with a vendor who can’t get a product to them so they can’t make their product — or they have delays in their product. That’s probably the biggest thing.”Iowans are innovative and they’re finding ways to work around their challenges, Ralston says, even during a national emergency. He adds, many Iowa manufacturers don’t keep a lot of inventory in stock, which is often a smart practice, but not so much during this situation.“What they’re doing is trying to find different suppliers, having some success with that,” Ralston says. “In other ways, they’re delayed in delivering their final product. So those are probably the two biggest things, finding other suppliers, and they’re able to do that so far, or just having delays in their delivery.”Most Iowans who work in factories can’t “shelter in place” and do their work from anywhere other than the workplace, so Ralston says employers are taking precautions.“It’s tough to have a manufacturing production worker work from home — that obviously doesn’t work,” Ralston says. “In many plants and factories, workers by nature are at least six feet apart in most situations. They’re also trying to make sure that employees, when they take breaks, for instance, that they maintain social distancing.”Ralston has a message for Iowa consumers, urging them to continue doing their part to keep the wheels of industry turning. “Be safe with your family but try to make it business as usual,” Ralston says. “Make sure the goods and services you normally purchase you’re purchasing in some way still. Pay attention to what the experts are telling us about health and safety, and as much as possible, try to make it business as usual.”The Association of Business and Industry is Iowa’s largest statewide business organization with more than 1,500 member companies representing 330,000 working Iowans.last_img read more

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