Speech: Minister for Africa urges action to tackle illegal wildlife trade

first_img firstly, how to tackle the illegal wildlife trade as a serious organised crime. This will consider how we strengthen law enforcement, and how we snuff out the associated corruption secondly, we are going to build coalitions to help us in this fight. We will harness technology, and share and scale up successful and innovative solutions we will look at how we close global markets for illegally traded wildlife products, tackling the demand problem. And yes, the UK will lead by example. We will be shutting down our ivory trade. We will be working with the EU to do the same. That’s something we can do irrespective of whether we are in the European Union or not. ConclusionIn conclusion to my remarks – we do not currently have the answers to all these challenges; but, if the international community works together, I know we can find the solutions. Together we can halt the alarming disappearance of these unique animals. The Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson sends his congratulations to everyone involved in the incredible work here. It is great to be here with you in beautiful Botswana.President Khama has been a towering force in what is appropriately named the Giants Club. Botswana’s abundance of diverse wildlife is testament to the fantastic job that President Khama, Space for Giants, and many other committed people and organisations are doing to protect these wonders and their natural habitat. I’d like to pay tribute to the founding members of this Club – the Presidents of Botswana, Gabon, Kenya, and Uganda. We’ve heard the strength of their ongoing commitment today, and they are an inspiration to Africa and the rest of the world.I want to hear more from the Giants Club, and from the other African delegates here today, about the action you think needs to be taken to realise African ambitions for a type of conservation that brings economic benefit to African communities. I want to say that the UK stands ready to help.Illegal Wildlife TradeWe are all here because we understand just how tragically short-sighted the illegal wildlife trade is and because we know that if we don’t act now, it will be too late, as many species could be approaching extinction.In 1979 there were 1.3 million African elephants, today there are only 415,000. And their populations are declining at an alarming rate, which is why we need action now.The illegal wildlife trade is threatening not only elephants, but many of the world’s endangered species – species that define national identities, and heavily influence economic development. We are all here because we know we need to preserve these riches, not destroy them. We also know that tragically, the curse of this trade is two-fold; as poaching and the illegal wildlife trade also has a deeply corrosive effect on human society.Poachers are now coming armed to the teeth, endangering not only animals’ lives, but human lives too. They undermine state institutions and governance, they illegally exploit your countries’ natural resources, often to benefit people and networks beyond your borders, and they foster the corruption which feeds discontent and insecurity.This insecurity can damage livelihoods and hold back development as well as robbing people of their economic potential. The criminals responsible must not be allowed to fracture your societies and plunder your children’s futures.These are the reasons that I and the Foreign Secretary are so passionate about tackling this illegal trade head-on. We believe the work you are doing. We believe in the cooperation between your countries through the Giants Club, and we believe that that is the key to achieving real change.Foreign Secretary’s commitmentThe Foreign Secretary has made the illegal wildlife trade a personal priority, and is dedicated to ending the illegal ivory trade. He wants 2018 to be the year that real changes are made. He is particularly excited by your proposals to create a cross border safe space for wildlife.Ambitious ideas like this are what is needed if real change is going to be achieved. Which is why Britain is supporting the awareness-raising work being done by Space for Giants, and I know the digital march of the elephants last week really set the tone for the summit.Tackling poachingOperations to tackle poaching will be discussed today, and they are another critical part of the Space for Giants programmes. The UK is funding practical action around the world to reduce demand, strengthen enforcement and develop sustainable livelihoods for communities affected by the illegal wildlife trade. Since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was launched in 2013 we have funded 47 such projects.One recent example involves the British military delivering anti-poaching activities with rangers in Gabon, and a follow-up project in Malawi. The project aims to reduce poaching, working with African park rangers for more effective and safer counter-poaching techniques.London ConferenceThe UK is hosting an important conference to tackle the illegal wildlife trade in October; and I know many of you will be attending. The conference will enable us to build on the work being done by the Giants Club and others groups. It will focus on 3 challenges:last_img read more

Read More →

Tracing migration’s impact

first_imgDeconstructing the multifarious and complex questions around migration and globalization may be the most direct route to a solution for the migration crisis facing the world today, Harvard experts said last week.Questions about its ethical, legal, social, cultural, and economic implications were the focus of the Harvard Global Institute’s second annual symposium on effecting resolution to critical issues.“The topic at hand today is an absolutely perfect one for the goals of the Global Institute, which is to bring scholars and researchers and students across fields together, to look at large global problems and to take a comparative look at issues that concern a variety of parts of the world and build on the enormous strengths we have at Harvard in regionally based centers and studies and programs,” President Drew Faust said in her opening remarks.The symposium, made up of scholars from many disciplines across Harvard, included sessions on migration and the modern world, the economic and political consequences of migration, and migration and social obligation.“The current cycle of migration crises in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia have haunted the global horizon for over a decade,” said Homi K. Bhabha, the Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities and one of the symposium’s moderators. “It’s not just an issue of modern life or modern history, it’s one of the major frameworks of it. Migration is like nation, it’s like class, it’s one of these major pedagogical and political and philosophical categories.”“On every dimension immigrants are absorbing into American society, in many ways faster than European immigrants 100 years ago,” said Mary C. Waters, the John L. Loeb Professor of Sociology. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerThose categories were defined and debated in the final panel, “Migration and Social Obligation.” Much of the discussion explored the question of who owes what to whom. What do residents owe migrants and what do migrants owe residents? Is that obligation based on legal status, socio-economic status, the capacity to speak the language, and/or the reason for the migration?“We’re not doing big picture on how you engage with populace politics and xenophobic anxieties in a country,” said panel moderator Jennifer L. Hochschild, the Henry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government and Professor of African and African American Studies. “This is more on the ground, what do we actually do as concrete individuals in an institution like Harvard that’s going to make a difference in the lives of people.”Panelist Sabrineh Ardalan, assistant director at the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program and assistant clinical professor of law at Harvard Law School, said her work at the clinic gives her an up-close view of the burdens on asylum seekers to prove their eligibility for protection, demonstrate credibility, and provide corroborating evidence. Applications for asylum have doubled since 2014, with 260,000 filed last year.“Every day, our clinic gets at least one phone call, and usually many more, from someone desperate looking for a place to call home, lost in the bureaucratic mess of our immigration system,” she said.There are 41 million immigrants in the U.S., which means one in every four residents here is an immigrant or a child of immigrants, according to Mary C. Waters, the John L. Loeb Professor of Sociology, who specializes in the study of immigration. She said the U.S. has always been intertwined with those who immigrate to this country: Our society needs them and they need us.“On every dimension immigrants are absorbing into American society, in many ways faster than European immigrants 100 years ago. And because undocumented immigration has basically not increased at all since 2008, it means that undocumented people are more and more settled families,” said Waters. “The average undocumented person has been here longer than 10 years. These are families with children — over 11 million of them. That is more people than lived under Jim Crow in the South prior to the Civil Rights Movement.”Restricting immigration, she said, “is bad for American society, American democracy, and it’s bad for the immigrants.”Jacqueline Bhabha, professor of the practice of health and human rights at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said any focus on social obligations in the U.S. must be qualified by a focus on its  global responsibilities. The number of asylum-seekers last year is indicative of the millions of people in the world in desperate need of protection from civil war and genocide, she said.“The simple answer to ‘What do we owe to whom and does it depend who is arriving?’ is, ‘We owe everybody the same,’” she said. “Because the principle of nondiscrimination is very fundamental to our modern, post-World War II regime, and indeed to the liberal constitutions we have inherited over the past 2½ centuries.”In closing remarks, Krishna Palepu, the Ross Graham Walker Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and senior advisor to Faust, said it is the mission of the Harvard Global Institute to do exactly what it did at the symposium: bring together people with multiple perspectives and different skill sets to have important conversations on crucial issues.“This afternoon has been a great illustration of the power of that kind of conversation,” he said.last_img read more

Read More →

MDI football team advances to semifinals

first_imgBAR HARBOR — Taner Bickford led the No. 3 Mount Desert Island football team to a 48-14 win over No. 6 Oceanside in Friday night’s Class C North quarterfinal.Bickford ran for 175 yards and three touchdowns to carry the 7-2 Trojans by the 4-5 Mariners.MDI will play at No. 2 Winslow at 1 p.m. on Saturday.MDI rolled to a 42-0 halftime lead on touchdown runs of 70, 4 and 30 yards by Bickford, a 50-yarder by Colby Lee, a 1-yarder by Croix Albee and a 50-yard punt return by Drew Rich.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textLee finished with 131 yards on 10 carries.Oceanside scored two fourth-quarter touchdowns, the first on an Isaiah Green 3-yard run and the second when Brandon Debrosky connected with Riley Sprague with a 5-yard pass.Billy Kerly rounded out the scoring for MDI with a 45-yard touchdown run in the fourth quarter. Real Estate Transfers Week of Sept. 17 – September 18, 2020 Bio Donald Trump Jr. to host Holden campaign event – September 18, 2020 Latest posts by (see all) Latest Posts Drive-thru flu shot clinics scheduled – September 18, 2020last_img read more

Read More →