Ween Plays The Classics For Night Two Of New York City Run [Watch]

first_imgLoad remaining images You can see the full setlist from last night, below:Setlist: Ween at Terminal 5, New York, NY – 4/15/16Set: Transdermal Celebration, Take Me Away, Learnin’ to Love, Big Jilm, Piss Up a Rope, Nan, Mister Richard Smoker, Stroker Ace, Transitions, Buckingham Green, Voodoo Lady, The Argus, I Play It Off Legit, Puerto Rican Power, Gabrielle, Wayne’s Pet Youngin, The Goin’ Gets Tough From the Getgo, Don’t Shit Where You Eat*, The Mollusk*, Stacey*, I Don’t Want to Leave You on the Farm*, Mutilated Lips*, Don’t Sweat It*, Put the Coke on My Dick, Demon Sweat, Ocean Man, Loop de Loop, How High Can You Fly?, Stay Forever, Tick, Papa Zit, Never Squeal> Drums> Improv/Jam> Never SquealEncore: Buenas Tardes Amigo*acoustic[Setlist via Brownbase]Check out a full gallery of images from night one below, courtesy of Chad Anderson: Ween continued their conquest of New York last night, playing their second of three sold-out shows at the Terminal 5 venue in New York, NY. The group carried on with their trend of monster-sized setlists, playing a total of 33 songs throughout the night. When the band brought out with “Transdermal Celebration” to start the show, fans knew they were in the right place.The group played a number of their staples, like “Take Me Away,” “Piss Up A Rope,” “Buckingham Green,” “Gabrielle” and so many more. The band even went acoustic for a six-song run in the middle of the set, stripping down tracks like “Don’t Shit Where You Eat” and “The Mollusk” to a captivated audience. The set ended with a potent rendition of “Never Squeal,” which featured a drum solo and an improv/jam segment to keep the fans on their toes.The show ended with a fond farewell, as the band encored with “Buenas Tardes Amigo.” Watch a handful of videos from the show below:last_img read more

Read More →

New program to tackle race and religion

first_imgThis semester, USC students have the opportunity to attend a variety of events dealing with themes of race and religion in society from the perspective of three major religions — Islam, Christianity and Judaism.Photo courtesy of USC LibrariesA religious experience · (From left) Amir Hussain, Pim Valkenberg and Reuven Firestone are the three participants in the new program.The Race, Faith and Violence program, a collaboration between the USC Caruso Catholic Center and the Institute for Advanced Catholic Studies, features panels of three scholars-in-residence from different faiths — Amir Hussain, Reuven Firestone, and Pim Valkenberg — having conversations about issues such as race, gender, sexuality and interfaith violence.The program was born out of an interest to address topics that are often considered taboo, but are at the center of current political discourse. The program is the brainchild of Father Jim Heft, the head of the Institute for Advanced Catholic Studies. Heft also had the idea to have  scholars-in-residence specifically available for students in order to engage in these difficult conversations during official events, at weekly office hours and scripture readings.Professor Amir Hussain is one of the three scholars-in-residence this semester. Hussain is a professor of theological studies at Loyola Marymount University and an editor for the Journal of the American Academy of Religion. He’s recently released a book about how American Muslims have become interwoven into American life and culture, titled Muslims and the Making of America. His work has focused on how different faiths can work together and has explored interfaith relationships, which made him one of the first people that Father Heft thought of when creating the program.“I think the opportunity to connect with people is great,” Hussain said, referring to what attracted him to the Race, Faith, and Violence program.Hussain emphasized the value of having multiple viewpoints at each of these events, and the successes they’ve had in diversity of speakers as well as the topics they’ve been able to cover. He credits much of this to the resources of the University and the help from the Caruso Center as well as the Institute.Pim Valkenberg is the second scholar-in-residence. He’s a professor of religion and culture in the School of Theology and Religious Studies at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., and has authored multiple books. He’s previously worked at the Institute for Advanced Catholic Studies through its “Learned Ignorance” series. Valkenberg specializes in partnerships between the Christian and Muslim faiths based on their shared Abrahamic heritage.Valkenberg agreed with Hussain on the benefits of this program. He said that the greatest advantage is having all day to work together with colleagues and students in small settings and the ability to learn from one another.However, Valkenberg also pointed out some of the difficulties of the program.“It’s really hard to advertise it in such a way that students think, ‘Whoa, this is really a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,’ which I really do think it is, but it’s kind of hard to find a language in letting students know about it,” Valkenberg said.Rev. Reuven Firestone, also a scholar-in-residence, is a USC professor in the School of Religion and the Middle East Studies Center, as well as the Regenstein professor in medieval Judaism and Islam at Hebrew Union College. He’s also written a number of books, has worked on numerous projects to promote interfaith understanding and worked to bring together different faiths, especially in the Middle East.To Hussain, this program is especially significant in today’s troubled political times, when people are struggling to see beyond the hateful political rhetoric of our presidential candidates.“What’s more topical than race, faith and violence in the age of Black Lives Matter, in the age of Islamophobia and the [2016] election? It’s really relevant for students today,” Hussain said.Correction: A previous version of this article stated that Professor Amir Hussain’s book was called “Islam and the Building of America.” It is called “Muslims and the Making of America.”last_img read more

Read More →

Oxford study: Tokyo Olympics are most costly Summer Games

first_img First Published: 4th September, 2020 10:05 IST Associated Press Television News SUBSCRIBE TO US COMMENT LIVE TV WATCH US LIVEcenter_img Written By The Tokyo Olympics are already the most expensive Summer Games on record with costs set to go higher, a wide-ranging study from Britain’s University of Oxford indicates.The Tokyo cost overrun already exceeds 200%, lead author Bent Flyvbjerg explained in an interview with The Associated Press. This is even before several billion more dollars are added on from the one-year delay from the COVID-19 pandemic.Flyvbjerg is an economist at Oxford’s Said Business School. His entire study is available here , and it’s set to be published on Sept. 15 in the journal “Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space.” It’s titled “Regression to the Tail: Why the Olympics Blow Up.”Tokyo, postponed until July 23, 2021, is only a small part of the focus. The study — the third in a series following editions 2012 and 2016 — looks at Olympic costs since 1960 and finds they keep increasing despite claims by the International Olympic Committee that costs are being cut.Flyvbjerg cites many reasons for the rising costs and cost overruns, and offers solutions for the IOC. The vast majority of costs are picked up by governments with the IOC contributing only a small portion.“The Olympics offer the highest level of risk a city can take on,” Flyvbjerg told AP. “The trend cannot continue. No city will want to do this because it’s just too expensive, putting themselves into a debt that most cities cannot afford.”In his paper, Flyvbjerg cites Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, whose city is to hold the 2028 Olympics following Paris in 2024.“Most cities, unless you have a government that’s willing to go into debt or pay the subsidy of what this costs, most cities will never say ‘yes’ to the Olympics again unless they find the right model,” he quotes Garcetti as saying.By the right model, Garcetti means lower costs.Tracking Olympic costs is difficult, a dense maze of overlap and debate. Politicians and organizers always argue over what are — and what are not — Olympic expenses.Flyvbjerg writes: “Unfortunatley, Olympics officials and hosts often misinform about the costs and cost overruns of the Games. … We therefore cannot count on organizers, the IOC, and governments to provide us with reliable information about the real costs, cost overruns, and cost risks of the Olympic Games.”Flyvbjerg looks only at costs to operate the games — the operating costs and capital costs — the cost to build sports venues. He leaves out a third category, which is usually many times larger: renovating roads, building airports, and what he calls “sprucing up projects,” which also fall to taxpayers.“Our estimates are conservative because there are lots of costs that are hidden that we can’t get into,” Flyvbjerg said. “And there are lots of costs we decided not to include because it’s too complex. We include the things we can get the most reliable numbers for and we do it in the same way for each city that we study.”He also excludes the cost of debt, and the future cost of running sports venues after the Olympics leave, and inflation.According to the Oxford numbers. Tokyo’s spending is at $15.84 billion, already surpassing the 2012 London Olympics, which were the most expensive summer games to date at $14.95 billion. He expects several billion more from the cost of the one-year delay.Tokyo organizers say officially they are spending $12.6 billion. However, a national auditor says the actual costs are twice that high, made up of some expenses that the Oxford study omits because they are not constant between different Olympics.Tokyo said the cost would be $7.3 billion when it won the bid in 2013.“They (IOC) obviously don’t like our results, but it’s very difficult to counter a piece of rigorous research like this,” Flyvbjerg said. “And they haven’t done that, and they can’t do that. Our research is a problem for them.”In an email to Associated Press, the IOC said it had not seen the latest Oxford study and declined to comment.It referenced another study by Mainz and Sorbonne universities.This study also found Olympic cost overruns but said they were in line with other large-scale projects. Flyvbjerg’s study finds they are not.Flyvbjerg said he has been in touch on and off with the IOC and had sent a colleague to an IOC workshop. He said a major reason for the rising costs is that the IOC does not pay for them. He also cited rising security costs, and moving the games around the world. He calls this the “Eternal Beginner Syndrome” with new host cities starting basically from scratch.He’s said the IOC has tried recently to rein in costs, but the effort is “too little, too late.”“They (IOC) define the specs but don’t pay for them,”Flyvbjerg said. “This is pretty similar to you and I giving the specs for a house that we are going to live in, but we don’t have to pay for it. How do you think we’d spend? We’d gold-plate it. This is what has happened over time.”Flyvbjerg said he’s relish a chance to sit and talk with IOC President Thomas Bach. He calls himself a fan of the Olympics.”It’s not that the IOC hasn’t been willing to talk, or I am not willing to talk,”he said. “We certainly are. We have communicated in writing to keep the IOC informed. But yes, we would like to sit down with Thomas Bach.”Image credits: AP Last Updated: 4th September, 2020 10:05 IST Oxford Study: Tokyo Olympics Are Most Costly Summer Games The Tokyo Olympics are already the most expensive Summer Games on record with costs set to go higher, a wide-ranging study from Britain’s University of Oxford indicates FOLLOW USlast_img read more

Read More →

Fantasy Baseball 3B Sleepers: Breakout, undervalued third basemen to add to 2020 draft cheat sheets

first_imgThe third base rankings are loaded heading into the 2020 fantasy baseball season, but that doesn’t mean you should ignore the 3B sleeper section on your draft cheat sheet. Finding the right undervalued players or potential breakouts in the mid-to-late rounds is how you maximize your draft, and fortunately there are several prime candidates at the hot corner. Because all are eligible at other positions (in fact, one isn’t even eligible at 3B yet), you can easily stock your team with a few of these guys and have the kind of interchangeable depth needed to win leagues. As with most of our sleeper lists, the running theme is “playing time”. If the players below get regular at-bats, they will have been undervalued in your draft. If they don’t, then they’ll be little more than useful fill-ins in daily transaction leagues or DFS contests. But we all know that even if a player doesn’t appear to have a clear path to regular at-bats in March, that can change in a hurry, and the players below are all capable enough to produce as soon as they get the chance.  More 2020 Fantasy Baseball: Auction Values | Mock Draft SimulatorAustin Riley, Braves (OF). Riley got off to a torrid start last year before eventually fading down the stretch. He still finished with 18 HRs in just 80 games and will compete for a starting job this spring. He’s only eligible at OF heading into the season, but if he gets regular playing time, it will likely be at 3B (or DH), which is why we’re still including him here. The 22-year-old slugger has the potential to put up massive HR and RBI totals, and while his high K-rate will always keep his average low, Riley is still being undervalued in drafts. ​Other 3B-eligible players we’ve highlighted as sleepers elsewhere: Carter Kieboom, Nationals (SS), Scott Kingery, Phillies (2B), Ian Happ (OF) DOMINATE YOUR DRAFT: Ultimate 2020 Fantasy Baseball Cheat SheetFantasy Baseball 3B SleepersPosition eligibility based on Yahoo default settings (10 games played or 5 games started)Tommy Edman, Cardinals (also eligible at 2B and OF). Edman played enough last year (92 games) that he’s not a secret, but he still might be undervalued by a large swath of the fantasy community. The 24-year-old switch-hitter can play virtually anywhere on the field, and after batting .304, swatting 11 homers, and swiping 15 bases in the majors last season, it’s clear he can produce worthwhile fantasy numbers. With fewer third basemen stealing an appreciable amount of bases, Edman can provide unique value if you’re willing to wait for your 3B.2020 Fantasy Baseball Rankings:Catcher | First | Second | Third | Short | Outfield | Starter | Reliever | Top 300Yandy Diaz, Rays (1B). Much was made of Diaz’s noticeably more muscular physique last year, and he put it to good use by clubbing 14 HRs in just 79 games. A foot injury limited his playing time, but Diaz showed his upside. With a relatively high BB-rate (10.1 percent) and low K-rate (17.6 percent), Diaz has a good hitting profile that should translate to solid all-around numbers across a full season. Playing time is the only worry — and it’s a legit worry — because Diaz isn’t great with the glove and the Rays have a host of competent players who can play 1B/3B/DH. That said, if Diaz can stick in the lineup, he’ll far outproduce his draft position.2020 Fantasy Baseball Sleepers:Catcher | First | Second | Short | Outfielder | Starter | Each teamYoshi Tsutsugo, Rays (OF). Tsutsugo is one of those players competing with with Diaz for playing time, even if indirectly. The 28-year-old lefty has been playing professionally in Japan the past 10 years, posting a .284/.382/.525 line with 205 career HRs. Even though he’s eligible at 3B and OF in Yahoo leagues, he could also play 1B and DH, so there will be plenty of ways Tsutsugo can get into the lineup. Whether he can stick there consistently is another thing, but if he can, he has plenty of upside. 2020 Fantasy Baseball Tiers, Draft Strategy:Catcher | First | Second | Third | Short | Outfield | Starter | RelieverNick Solak, Rangers (2B). Solak impressed in his 33-game stint in the majors last year (.293/.393/.491 line), which isn’t a surprise considering he was dominating at Triple-A (.347/.386/.653). It is a bit disappointing he didn’t run much (seven total SBs last year) after swiping 21 bases at Double-A in 2018, but Solak made up for that by hitting 32 homers between Triple-A and the majors. He’ll have to compete for a starting job, but if he can prove capable on defense, Solak will be a hot commodity. Fantasy Baseball Draft Strategies: Auction | Keeper/Dynasty | PointsJon Berti, Marlins (SS, OF). Bereti doesn’t fit the mold of a typical sleeper. First starters, he’s 30 and doesn’t have a regular spot in the lineup, but the speedy utility player is still expected to be in the Marlins lineup most days. If he is, he’ll steal a good amount of bases (17 in 73 games last year) and pop some homers (six last season). It’s unclear if Berti will be much more than a one-category contributor, but even if he’s just stealing bases, he’ll still have value. last_img read more

Read More →