U.S. solar outlook surges despite tariffs

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:Projections for utility-scale solar growth from 2020 to 2022 now exceed forecasts drafted before the Trump administration’s announcement of Section 201 tariffs, according to new analysis from energy research and consulting company Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables.Many external factors, like global oversupply, a spike in corporate procurements and the passage of California’s SB100 law mandating 100 percent clean energy, have helped shift the market since the January 2018 tariff announcement. Analysts say the overall health of the industry has blunted the industry’s worst-fear impacts, even if the dynamics of the market look different than they did then.“It’s absolutely not apples-to-apples, but to me that’s a really important message,” said Colin Smith, a senior solar analyst at Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables who covers the utility-scale market. “Not only has the market recovered and done really well despite the tariffs, it’s actually to the point where we expect more solar — at least on the utility-scale solar side — than we did in the pre-tariff conditions.”Smith said WoodMac’s Q1 2019 utility-scale forecast for 2020 is 8 percent higher than its Q4 2017 forecast, released before the administration finalized tariffs. It’s 2021 forecast is 19 percent higher than the pre-tariff projection.Notwithstanding the jumble of tariffs impacting solar systems — on modules, inverters and aluminum and steel — prices have also hit historic lows: $0.93 per watt DC for utility fixed-tilt systems and $1.04 per watt DC for utility single-axis tracking systems.With a robust utility-scale pipeline over 23 gigawatts and expected growth in coming years, analysts say the industry has proved resilient to the tariff-tied uncertainty that once gripped it. Analysts also pointed to an “unprecedented” 13.2 gigawatts of utility-scale power purchase agreements signed last year as another indication of a bounce-back.More: Utility-scale solar projections now exceed pre-tariff forecasts U.S. solar outlook surges despite tariffslast_img read more

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McGinn: We can cope with absences

first_img The chances of a repeat performance in Belfast could hinge on how many defenders O’Neill has left by the time kick-off comes around – with Daniel Lafferty suspended, Craig Cathcart missing with a knee injury and Aaron Hughes (groin) and Ryan McGivern (knock) both rated as “extreme doubts”. Hughes’ injury means three of the four defenders on duty in the morale-boosting 1-0 win over Russia last time out could be missing against Portugal – Lafferty and Cathcart are the others – leaving Gareth McAuley to man for the fort alongside the returning Jonny Evans. McGinn accepts there have been setbacks but is far from downbeat. “We know it’s a massive challenge. We’re down to the bare bones defensively but there are boys capable of coming in and doing a good job,” the Aberdeen forward said. “You can’t make excuses before the game. We know from training the squad is strong enough to go out and do a good job. We definitely have boys to come in.” Reflecting on the draw in October, and his own part in it, McGinn said: “It was massive. A lot of things came into it… Ronaldo’s 100th cap, playing Portugal in their backyard and the fact that no-one gave us a chance. “Ronaldo’s one of best players in world. He’ll be renowned for reaching that milestone of 100 caps for Portugal so for a wee country boy like me from Donaghmore to score on a special night for him was fantastic. “The boys came away disappointed not to win the game in the end but we know, being realistic, that to come away with a point was fantastic.” If Hughes and McGivern do fail to rally in time, O’Neill faces a selection poser. His other defensive options include the uncapped Rory McKeown, the versatile Alex Bruce – who has yet to feature in a competitive match – and Shane Ferguson, who has been deployed in midfield throughout O’Neill’s reign. A maverick solution to the right-back position might even be to deploy the imposing utility man Josh Magennis, despite the fact he has been playing as a striker for Aberdeen in the last two seasons. Pondering his problems, O’Neill told Sky Sports News: “Aaron has a groin problem from the last few minutes against Newcastle. We’re in constant conversation and we left him an extra day with his club, actually. “He’ll report today (Wednesday) and we’ll see how he is, but he’s an extreme doubt. Ryan (McGivern) is the same to be honest, an extreme doubt. “We have Craig Cathcart out too so that limits us slightly. It’ll be a different back four to what we had against Russia and we may have to look at players who wouldn’t have full-back as their natural position. “We have options and I don’t know if I’ll call anyone in, to be honest, but I’ll assess it.” Press Association The sides meet in a World Cup qualifier at Windsor Park on Friday night, with Ronaldo looking to make up for the reverse fixture when Michael O’Neill’s side spoiled the celebrations around his 100th cap by grabbing a 1-1 draw. McGinn was Northern Ireland’s goalscorer in Porto that night, upstaging Ronaldo with a wonderful finish before Helder Postiga levelled in the last 10 minutes. Northern Ireland may be down to the “bare bones” in defence but Niall McGinn has not given up hope of another shock result against Cristiano Ronaldo’s Portugal.last_img read more

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Follow COVID-19 protocols or else we’ll lose our jobs, Aaron Finch advises teammates

first_imgMELBOURNE: As Australia prepare to fly to the United Kingdom for their upcoming limited-overs tour, skipper Aaron Finch on Tuesday called on his players to strictly adhere to the COVID-19 protocols as they owe it to fans and to administrators around the world who have worked on the logistics of the resumption of cricket to toe the line.Australia will be playing three T20Is and as many ODIs against England starting September 4. While the T20Is will be played at the Ageas Bowl in Southampton, the ODIs will be held at the Old Trafford in Manchester. “What’s important to remember is we are in a position to help continue the global game, and there should be no more motivation than that to do everything right. I’ve been very strong with the guys in the last couple of weeks about making sure that we do literally everything we can with regards to the protocols to keep the global game going,” Finch told a virtual press conference as per cricket.com.au. “Because at the end of the day, if that fails then we are all out of jobs and the game is not in a healthy state, which we can’t afford to have. There’s been so much time and effort put in by thousands of people to give us the opportunity to play international cricket again, and even us leaving Australia, leaving Victoria, is a big process. “The people who’ve worked their backside off over the last couple of months to allow it to happen in Australia, in the UK, in India, South Africa, the UAE, wherever it is, thousands of people are doing an unbelievable amount of work to get the game up and running again. “We owe it to them in particular to do everything right,” he added. The 2020 T20 World Cup has been postponed because of the COVID-19 pandemic to 2022, thus making the 2021 T20 World Cup in India as the next major men’s global tournament. However, Finch believes the location of the tournament will have little bearing on the specific roles Australia want for their T20I side. “What it does do is give people an opportunity to jump out of the pack and really make a great case to be part of that final 15 for the World Cup in India,” said Finch. “The fact it’s been pushed back 12 months and it’s in India, it doesn’t really change the way we structure up the side because we feel like we had a lot of bases covered. Depending on wickets and conditions that we could go either way with that structure,” he added. IANS Also Watch: Govt Acts Tough On Schools Without Licenceslast_img read more

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Discovering a home and a heritage: Director of El Centro Chicano shares his experience with the USC Latinx community

first_imgEveryday he wakes up with a burning desire to help Latinx students at USC. As the director of El Centro Chicano, Billy Vela leads the cultural center for Latinx students. Like many Latinx students at USC, Vela went through many hardships growing up. Vela was born in 1972 to Guatemalan immigrant parents and grew up in Highland Park.“We were on welfare but [my mother] was working like a mad woman,” Vela said. “At that time just because you were on welfare did not mean you were coasting.” Despite the challenges he faced, Vela graduated from Franklin High School and went on to attend Occidental College where he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. Vela said he has always been an advocate for Central Americans. At Occidental College, Vela co-founded the Central American Student Association.He then attended Columbia University, Teacher’s College and received his master’s degree in Student Personnel Administration with an emphasis in Multiculturalism.After graduating from Columbia, Vela worked as a resident director at UC Berkeley and as the director of Chicano Latino Student Services at Loyola Marymount University. Vela joined USC as director of El Centro Chicano in 2005, recruited by Corliss Bennett-McBride, former director of  the Center for Black Cultural and Student Affairs. Since then Vela has used his experiences to encourage and support students facing the struggles he faced as a first-generation Latinx student.“As leaders of this center, I am glad we are here to advocate,” Vela said. “To make sure El Centro feels welcoming and has murals and images that make people feel included.” Along with providing a place for Latinx students to visit and do work, El Centro Chicano also hosts the “El Sol y la Luna” Latino Floor in Fluor Tower. Created in 1974-75, the Latino Floor residential program is an opportunity offered to first-year students looking to connect with other students with similar interests and cultural backgrounds. Angeles Medina is one of the many students who found home as one of the residents of The Latino Floor. Now a rising sophomore, she said she feels fortunate to have worked with Vela.“Billy is the kind of person who makes you feel comfortable, but he pushes your thinking,” Medina said. “He’s woke. He is very progressive and inclusive. He stays informed politically and encourages students he encounters to do so as well.” Alberto Bravo, a sophomore majoring in history, is a special projects assistant at El Centro. He works closely with Vela and also was a resident on the Latino Floor.“I think Billy is the kind of Latinx who is proud of his culture, but he [also] acknowledges outdated views and adversity our community face,” Bravo said. “And he wants to push his community out of that mentality and way of living.”Along with aiding Latinx students at USC, Vela said he finds much of his inspiration from his mother and his family. He said that, like him, many Latinx students try to succeed because of their family.“There’s not a student without family,” Vela said. “There’s not a student without mom, without dad, without your tia or your tio or your abuelita. Whoever it was. People are people, but Latinos — we’re family based. It’s so important to us.” As for the future, Vela hopes to obtain his Ph.D and continue to advocate for diversity and inclusion. Vela states that one of his greatest accomplishments is finding his path and passion for education. “[One of my greatest accomplishments] has been finding my identity. Finding my history. Becoming a whole person because that was a big thing that was missing and I think it’s missing for a lot of us,” Vela said. “At the same time while that’s happening finding out a way to help others because that’s what my mom taught me.”last_img read more

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