Wave-current interactions in a wave-dominated tidal inlet

first_imgWave-current interactions play a major role in the dynamics of shallow tidal inlets. This study investigates these interactions at a natural inlet, with a strong focus on current-induced changes on wave propagation. The analysis of hydrodynamic data collected at the Albufeira lagoon, Portugal, revealed spatiotemporal variations of water levels and wave heights along the inlet, attributed to wave-current interaction processes. We compared the simulations of a coupled wave-circulation modeling system, computed with and without waves, and propagated with and without current feedback. The wave-induced setup inside the lagoon represented 7%–15% of the offshore significant wave height. The accuracy of the wave’s predictions improved when current feedback was included. During ebb, the currents increased the wave height at the mouth of the inlet (up to 20%) and decreased the wave height in the inlet (up to 40%), due to current-induced refraction, steepness dissipation, and partial blocking. During flood, the currents decreased the wave height in the inlet (up to 10%) and increased the wave height at the exterior parts of the ebb shoal (up to 10%), due to current-induced refraction. These effects significantly attenuate seaward sediment fluxes during ebb and contribute to the sediment accretion in the inlet.last_img read more

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Time to Talk

first_img Bower said parents who don’t already have an open, communicative relationship with their teen-age children, though, shouldn’t expect that to suddenly change. “Many teens will continue to clam up,” Bower said. “Some will say some outlandish things to test their parents.” Teens often won’t open up with parents out of fear of being punished or judged. “They may talk more openly with grandparents, neighbors, teachers and other trusted adults,” he said. Opening lines of communication is more than talking and listening. “Part of it is spending time together,” he said. “It’s initiating opportunities that don’t just happen with today’s hectic schedules.” Schools and families today, he said, often have fewer adults giving concentrated time to children. And adults are vital in children’s lives. “It’s well documented that children with caring adults more actively involved in their lives do much better than kids who have less of that,” Bower said. But school violence isn’t an issue just for schools. “We know that violence is a learned response,” he said. “Children learn how to solve their problems through a great many ways in our society.” As tragic as school shootings like the May 20 Atlanta incident are, a University of Georgia expert says parents and other adultswho work with teen-agers can find a silver lining.”Parents can take it as an opportunity to start talking with, and listening to,their teens,” said Don Bower, an associateprofessor of children, youth and families with the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences.Even that good side, he said, can turn ugly if parents approach it wrong.”Take the time to sit down and talk with them, not tothem,” he said. “Stifle the urge to lecture. Just try to get them to help youunderstand what’s going on in their lives. Ask them what their friends are saying, andunderstand that that is likely what your child is thinking as well.”Bower specializes in parenting education, adolescent development and at-risk youth. Heurges parents and other adults to search with their teens for ways to prevent such violentoutbreaks.”The immediate tendency is to look for people or situations to blame,” hesaid. “But it’s more constructive to talk about the responsibility all of us share –individuals, families and communities — to see that this sort of thing doesn’t happenagain.”Get Teens to Open Up No Simple Answers Time With Caring Adultscenter_img Lower Risk of Shootings Bower said there isn’t a simple way to prevent another school shooting. But being able to talk with teens and listen to their problems is part of the answer. “Teens generally know the students who are more likely to act out in violent ways,” Bower said. “But they can’t tell, any more than anyone else, which ones will actually go over the edge. Teens are also sensitive about turning in friends for what may be nothing.” Fellow students may be less likely than adults to offer the help troubled students need. “They don’t want to be perceived as friends to kids who are less popular,” he said. “A few may be sufficiently empathic that they try to befriend them. But most don’t. That’s a skill, however, that parents and teachers can model.” Despite all the media coverage of the shootings, Bower said, the rate of school violence is actually down. And the fast-approaching summer break will help cool down the perception and the risk of more shootings. “The end of the school year is a stressful time,” he said. “And there’s a pattern of copycat behaviors — troubled kids see the notoriety others get, and they’re tempted to act out those behaviors.” With school out for the summer, media coverage will subside. And school systems are now much more aware of potential problems. Bower said he expects the risks will be much lower when children return to school in the fall.last_img read more

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Chittenden Bank Announces the Retirement of President

first_imgChittenden Bank Announces the Retirement of President and CEO Lawrence W. DeShaw BURLINGTON — Chittenden Corporation(NYSE: CHZ) has announced that Lawrence W. DeShaw, President and CEO ofChittenden Bank, will retire at the end of the first quarter of 2005,after 34 years of dedicated service. “This decision did not come easy, after 34 years of service to Chittenden.Chittenden Bank means a great deal to me and I will truly miss everyone Ihave worked with over the years. I have chosen to make this transition ata time when Chittenden is strong and stable. The senior management teamis knowledgeable and fully committed to our customers. Our Board ofDirectors is engaged and experienced in all of the facets of business inthe communities we serve,” said DeShaw. Mr. DeShaw joined Chittenden in 1971, as a Loan Officer in the PersonalCredit Department and later that year was promoted to Treasurer. Over thenext 6 years, Mr. DeShaw was promoted to Assistant Vice President in thePersonal Credit Department and then Vice President of the Commercial LoanDepartment. In 1983, he was promoted to President of Mountain TrustCompany, an affiliate of Chittenden Trust Company at the time. In 1985,Mountain Trust Company was merged into Chittenden and Mr. DeShaw returnedto Commercial Lending. Soon after, he was promoted to the President ofChittenden’s Mortgage Company, where he remained for 2 years. Mr. DeShawwas then promoted to Executive Vice President in charge of Operations andTechnology for the Corporation and in January of 2003, he took over thePresidency of Chittenden Bank. Throughout his career, Mr. DeShaw has taken Chittenden through manydifficult and exciting times. In 1971, Chittenden’s assets were $173Million. Between 1971 and today Chittenden has acquired 10 banks and hasgrown the assets of Chittenden Bank to $3 Billion and ChittendenCorporation, the parent company to $6.1 Billion. In 1971, Chittenden Bankhad 14 locations. Today, they cover nearly every corner of Vermont with51 locations. Mr. DeShaw has been a key part of the Executive Management Team ofChittenden Corporation. He has aided in launching new products andservices to our customers, merged several acquired banks and most recentlywas involved in a significant system wide conversion. “At Chittenden Corporation, we all share a sense of sadness as Larryretires. We wish to thank him for his valuable contributions toChittenden and its clients,” commented Paul Perrault, Chairman ofChittenden Corporation. ABOUT CHITTENDEN BANK Chittenden Bank is a full-service, Vermont-headquartered and managed bankproviding a wide range of financial services and products to individualsand businesses. As the largest Vermont-based bank in the state, Chittendenoffers 51 locations. To find out more about Chittenden, visit our websiteat http://www.chittenden.com(link is external) or call your local branch. ABOUT CHITTENDEN CORPORATION Chittenden Corporation is a bank holding company headquartered inBurlington, Vermont. Through its subsidiary banks(1), the Company offersa broad range of financial products and services to customers throughoutNorthern New England and Massachusetts, including deposit accounts andservices; commercial and consumer loans; insurance; and investment andtrust services to individuals, businesses and the public sector. (1) Chittenden’s subsidiaries are Chittenden Bank, The Bank of WesternMassachusetts, Flagship Bank and Trust Company, Maine Bank & Trust Companyand Ocean National Bank. Chittenden Bank also operates under the nameMortgage Service Center and it owns Chittenden Insurance Group andChittenden Securities, Inc.last_img read more

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Ethiopia distributes wheat and oil to millions facing hunger

first_imgEthiopia’s government has started distributing rations of wheat and oil to people facing hunger in the north and northeastern parts of the country.The government is now supplying 15 kilograms of wheat and half a litre of cooking oil per adult in the areas hit by drought conditions, according to Mitiku Kassa, secretary of the Ethiopian Disaster Prevention and Preparedness Committee.More than 8 million people require urgent food assistance, and the Ethiopian government says there is enough food aid to feed them through December.Sisay Gebrselassie, a resident of Wukro town in Northern Ethiopia who recently moved to the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa, said he believed one in five families in his hometown lost their crops. “They have now left their farmlands for their cattle to scavenge whatever they can get from it,” he said, adding that many farmers are selling their cattle before they die.The UN says the scale of the developing emergency exceeds resources available so far.The food insecurity is fuelled by the failure of Ethiopia’s spring rains that resulted in poor crop yields.last_img read more

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