Leading Tanzanian daily suspended for seven days

first_img News Under the Statistics Act that Tanzania adopted in 2017, publishing statistics at variance with the official figures is punishable by fines and prison sentences. The legislative arsenal that can be deployed against independently reported information was also reinforced in April 2018 by a law under which online content producers have to pay exorbitant accreditation fees to register with the authorities. RSF said at the time that it would destroy Tanzania’s blogosphere. Organisation Tanzanian media unable to cover Covid-19 epidemic November 5, 2020 Find out more TanzaniaAfrica Condemning abuses Follow the news on Tanzania “The suspension of this leading independent newspaper is the latest in a long list of press freedom violations, of which the scale and frequency are alarming,” said Arnaud Froger, the head of RSF’s Africa desk. “Tanzania used to be regarded as an exception in a region where civil liberties are constantly threatened, but it has now joined the club of regimes that are press freedom predators. The authorities must end this suspension at once and guarantee the freedom to disseminate news and information, as required by the constitution.” Reports News November 27, 2020 Find out more to go further February 4, 2021 Find out more According to RSF’s tally, at least four newspapers and six radio stations have been suspended since John Magufuli became president in 2015. Last November, two representatives of the Committee to Protect Journalists were arrested and forced to leave the country. At the same time, the authorities have conducted no serious investigation into the disappearance of Azory Gwanda, a reporter for Mwananchi (The Citizen’s Swahili version), who went missing in November 2017 while investigating a series of murders of local officials in the eastern Pwani region. March 4, 2019 Leading Tanzanian daily suspended for seven dayscenter_img Help by sharing this information Tanzania is ranked 93rd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index after falling ten places in the space of a year, one of the biggest falls registered by any country. Receive email alerts The suspension was ordered by the print media regulatory authority, a direct offshoot of the information ministry, which accused the widely read newspaper of publishing “false and misleading” information about a devaluation in the Tanzanian shilling. Eight western embassies condemned the suspension on social networks, suggesting that it was out of all proportion to the alleged offence. Hassan Habasi, who is the government’s spokesman as well as heading the print media regulator, did not respond to RSF’s calls and messages. Twitter arbitrarily blocks South African newsweekly and several reporters over Covid vaccine story TanzaniaAfrica Condemning abuses After checking with banks and currency exchange bureaux, The Citizen reported on 23 February that the US dollar was actually selling for 2,415 Tanzanian shillings, although the central bank official rate was 2,300 shillings. A man reads on March 23, 2017 in Arusha, northern Tanzania, the local English-written daily newspaper “The Citizen”. Crédit : AFP News RSF_en Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the Tanzanian government’s decision to suspend one of the country’s leading daily newspapers, The Citizen, for seven days. The publishing ban, which began on 28 February, is the latest development in a significant and alarming decline in press freedom in Tanzania, RSF said. The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africalast_img read more

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Judge Rules HSBC Must Face RMBS Suits From Investors

first_img June 2, 2015 1,015 Views HSBC Holdings Lawsuits Residential Mortgage-backed securities 2015-06-02 Brian Honea Judge Rules HSBC Must Face RMBS Suits From Investors Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Secondary Market Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Share Save Home / Daily Dose / Judge Rules HSBC Must Face RMBS Suits From Investors Subscribe Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Previous: Distressed Sales Do Not Slow Home Price Appreciation Next: DS News Webcast: Wednesday 6/3/2015center_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Judge Shira Sheindlin of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Manhattan ruled HSBC Holdings must face three lawsuits from investors that claim the bank tried to hide defects in residential mortgage-backed securities from them before the crisis, according to media reports.Plaintiffs BlackRock Inc., Allianz SE’s Pacific Investment Management Co., and TIAA-CREF, claim that HSBC breached its duties as the trustee in 283 trusts, causing more than $34 billion in losses when the financial crisis hit in 2008, according to a report from Reuters.Scheindlin wrote in her decision that it was “plausible” to infer that HSBC knew about the breaches. According to court papers, the mortgage-backed securities in the lawsuit were issued during a four-year period from 2004 to 2008.In late March, Scheindlin denied HSBC’s motion to have the suits by the investors dismissed. HSBC was asking for the judge to dismiss the complaints based on lack of subject matter jurisdiction.In addition to allowing the plaintiffs to pursue the breach of contract suits against HSBC, Scheindlin ruled that they could pursue a conflict of interest claim against the British-based bank, accusing it of refusing to expose loan servicers who engaged in misconduct, according to reports.Some claims of negligence were dismissed, according to reports. The plaintiffs were allowed 30 days to amend the complaints. A follow-up conference has been scheduled for June 24.A spokesperson for HSBC declined to comment on the judge’s ruling when reached by email. An attorney for the plaintiffs did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Plaintiffs BlackRock, Allianz, and TIAA-CREF were involved in a similar suit that was dismissed in May by U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest in Manhattan. In that suit, the plaintiffs accused Bank of America and U.S. Bancorp of failing in their duties as trustees for 843 mortgage-backed securities totaling about $778 billion in collateral. Forrest ruled that the claims were not pleaded correctly on 33 of the trusts and that the remaining 810 trusts did not fall under her jurisdiction. Tagged with: HSBC Holdings Lawsuits Residential Mortgage-backed securities About Author: Brian Honea The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland.  Print This Post Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agolast_img read more

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Analyzing Millennial Homeowners’ Credit Profiles

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Analyzing Millennial Homeowners’ Credit Profiles March 22, 2019 1,110 Views Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Radhika Ojha is an independent writer and copy-editor, and a reporter for DS News. She is a graduate of the University of Pune, India, where she received her B.A. in Commerce with a concentration in Accounting and Marketing and an M.A. in Mass Communication. Upon completion of her masters degree, Ojha worked at a national English daily publication in India (The Indian Express) where she was a staff writer in the cultural and arts features section. Ojha, also worked as Principal Correspondent at HT Media Ltd and at Honeywell as an executive in corporate communications. She and her husband currently reside in Houston, Texas. About Author: Radhika Ojha Even though they are the largest group of homebuyers, what is keeping millennial renters from buying real estate? A study by LendingTree set to answer this question by analyzing the credit profiles of millennial homeowners and comparing them with those of renters in the same age group.The study found that millennial homeowners had a higher credit profile than renters, with a median credit score of 671 compared with 582 for nonhomeowners. The study found that this was one of the key reasons that kept renters from becoming homeowners as higher scores make homeownership more accessible.It also found that homeowners had more accounts than renters. While the average homeowner had around nine accounts, renters or nonhomeowners had an average of four accounts.The higher credit scores also helped homeowners to borrow more, according to the analysis. This included the nonmortgage categories where homeowners had a median balance of $6,633 in credit card balances, compared to $2,218 for renters. As a result, only 64 percent of renters had a credit card balance compared with 92 percent homeowners.”This reflects the higher credit scores of homeowning millennials, as they are able to obtain more credit accounts. Many renters may face difficulty accessing credit due to their lower credit scores,” said Tendayi Kapfidze, Chief Economist, LendingTree.Despite lesser access to credit, the analysis found that renters’ median utilization of their available credit was 58 percent, “almost double the 31 percent for homeowners.”While homeowners and renters owed almost an equal amount in student debt, at 37 percent, the analysis indicated that homeowners were more likely to have an auto loan as well as personal loans. However, renters had more trouble servicing their debt, “with an average of eight negative marks on their credit profiles compared with just three for homeowners,” Kapfidze said.Renters were late on 4.6 percent of all payments over four years, with homeowners late on just 1.5 percent of payments. Credit Scores debt hoemowners LendingTree loans Millennials Renters 2019-03-22 Radhika Ojha Share Save The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Tagged with: Credit Scores debt hoemowners LendingTree loans Millennials Renters The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agocenter_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago  Print This Post Analyzing Millennial Homeowners’ Credit Profiles Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Previous: What Will Hold Back Home Sales? Next: Housing Market Needs New Construction Subscribelast_img read more

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