Limerick industrial poisoning claims should be investigated

first_imgTwitter Whiff of trouble lingers over gasworks Advertisement TAGSAskeatonbarrister Emmett O’BrienDepartment of AgricultureEnvironmental Protection AgencyEPAindustrial poisoningMinisterMusic Limerick Linkedin Minister Patrick O’ Donovan announces opening of Limerick heritage site to the public for the first time Facebook [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up ALLEGATIONS that industrial poisoning in areas of County Limerick were covered up in the mid-1990s should be investigated immediately, according to a barrister who has a farm in the locality.Reports of serious animal and human health problems across 27 farms in Askeaton made national news almost 20 years ago and with the emergence of new evidence questioning the conclusions of an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report into the complaints, calls are now being made for the matter to be reexamined.Barrister Emmett O’Brien, who is a member of the Fianna Fáil national executive and owns a farm in neighbouring Pallaskenry, has called for a public inquiry into the EPA report.He said that the new evidence suggested that the original findings of the EPA may have covered up industrial poisoning in Askeaton and the surrounding communities.At the time of the original complaints, the Government asked the EPA to conduct an environmental investigation but, according to new evidence, there were inconsistencies between the report and the findings made by different experts hired by the EPA.Mr O’Brien said that these discrepancies were highlighted in a recent investigation by Hot Press magazine.“These are serious accusations and must be addressed immediately,” he said.He maintains that there should be a public inquiry into the report and its findings, and above all, that the local community have their questions answered and concerns addressed in an open, public forum.“Whatever the final conclusion of the report, the local community will remain sceptical unless they can have their own concerns directly answered. We are talking not only about people’s livelihoods, but their health and well-being. This is too serious an issue to brush under the carpet,” he said.Mr O’Brien said he was alarmed by the allegation that Teagasc, a division of the Department of Agriculture, was assigned by the EPA to help with the investigation and reportedly found that the farms showed clear signs of fluoride contamination.“At a minimum, the allegations that the EPA report was seriously flawed deserves first hand intervention by the Minsters of Agriculture and the Environment, as well as a public inquiry,” he concluded. Government blocks O’Dea Bill to remove EPA immunity Limerick Lotto winners pledge to use winnings to secure children’s futurecenter_img Askeaton/ Ballysteen bring Easter joy to local community Email NewsCommunityLimerick industrial poisoning claims should be investigatedBy Staff Reporter – October 3, 2013 822 Limerick Post Show shines at Digital Media Awards Previous articleMen were bound, gagged and taken for ransomNext articleSeven Limerick players make GAA/GPA All Star Nominations Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Print WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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Audio update – New EU Healthcare Directive could help patients on LGH waiting lists…

first_img By admin – June 23, 2015 Google+ WhatsApp Twitter 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Facebook Facebook Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Homepage BannerNews Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry center_img WhatsApp Google+ Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Pinterest 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Audio update – New EU Healthcare Directive could help patients on LGH waiting lists – Harkin Twitter Previous articleMan due in court following Derry assaultNext articleGardai try to trace 06 Corolla Verso in connection with serious crime in Donegal admin The implementation of a European Cross Border Healthcare Directive means the HSE is obliged to pay pay for treatments in other EU countries.With over 18,000 people on in and out patient waiting lists at Letterkenny General Hospital, Independent MEP Marian Harkin is urging them to consider travelling across the border, or to other EU countries, to access more immediate hospital treatments.She says Ireland had been slow to adopt the European Cross Border Healthcare Directive but has now done so.Travel and treatment costs do have to be paid up front, and the HSE then reimburses the patient on presentation of invoices. However, Ms Harkin says she is in touch with the Credit Union with a view to reaching a deal on special loans…………….Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/mharkweb.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Ms Harkin’s statement in full -The implementation of the European Cross Border Healthcare Directive will mean that the HSE will pay for treatments for Donegal patients who currently have to endure ongoing lengthy waiting lists.This was stated by Independent MEP Marian Harkin when she urged the 18,499 in and out-patients currently on Letterkenny General Hospital waiting lists to consider travelling cross border, or to other EU countries, to access more immediate hospital treatments.“It almost seems to be a well kept secret that the HSE is obliged to fund treatments in Northern Ireland or throughout the EU that are already available in the Republic. This can mean much shorter or no waiting times for patients who are on waiting lists”, she said.Ireland had been slow to adopt the European Cross Border Healthcare Directive but it was now available for all and patients from Donegal could access treatments even if they were not currently on waiting lists, she said.“For those who have been, and will continue to be, on lengthy waiting lists the Cross Border Health Directive affords a significantly better opportunity for treatment by healthcare experts with consequent enhancement of their well being and quality of life”, she said.The scheme required patients to initially fund their travel expenses, and payment for treatment, but the HSE was committed to paying for the treatment on receipt of the invoice, she said. There are certain rules and regulations, but nothing excessive, and member states have a duty under EU law to facilitate patients who apply, she added.“In order that everybody, including those lacking financial resources, can access this EU scheme I will be proposing to the Credit Union movement that they provide where necessary up front funding, with appropriate conditions, to ensure that all who wish can avail of this very welcome opportunity”, Independent MEP Marian Harkin concluded. The HSE National Contact Point of the Cross Border Healthcare Directive is in Kilkenny – telephone 056-7784546 Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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Bob Cornett, Spirit Of The Suwannee Music Park Co-Founder, Passes Away

first_imgBob Cornett, co-founder of the much beloved festival venue The Spirit Of The Suwannee Music Park, passed away yesterday after a brief illness. Alongside his late wife, Jean, Bob lived a life of service to his fellow man in the furtherance of a truly beautiful dream. The Cornetts set out to bring people together, to build community, and to unite the world through the power of music.The love of the music of the Appalachian hills and the hollers of Kentucky led the couple to throw gatherings for their fellow fans. That music, made with instruments brought from distant lands by people looking to start new lives and new families, was and is the very essence of the American Dream. This lead to the founding of Kentucky’s longest running music gathering, The Festival Of The Bluegrass, held the second week of June each year at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Kentucky.In time, the Cornetts wanted to create a place where the music could start earlier in the year and go later than the wintry weather of Kentucky would allow.  A place where music lovers from all walks of life could call home.  Their search found them a slice of paradise along the Suwannee, long ago immortalized in song by yet another Kentuckian, Stephen Foster. Jean Cornett fell in love with the scenic natural splendor of the Park and the couple quickly began to build what is today one of the most highly regarded festival venues in the world.Though Bob would joke that he mostly did everything to keep Jean happy, his exhaustive efforts to help build the Park clearly showed how much he cared. In the decades since, the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park has become a home to music fans of all varieties, all of them welcome in the home that Bob and Jean built. The Cornetts were that rare breed, a shining example of what could be accomplished when one sets their intention to build community.Music fans from the mountains of Kentucky, to the banks of the historic Suwannee River in Florida and beyond mourn the loss of this man and his late wife Jean as living, breathing gifts to the music community. Though our hearts are heavy at this loss, we should all be comforted by the thought that their legacy will endure.The legacy of Bob and Jean Cornett isn’t just festivals and a stage or two in the woods of northern Florida. It’s the shining example they set for us all. The living embodiment of serving each other, the heights we can scale when working together and the power of love itself.Bob and Jean Cornett had six sons. Though they experienced every parent’s fear when Hugh died in 1987 the rest of their children have thrived in no small part due to the lessons learned watching their parents. It’s that generational learning, the passing down of knowledge and love that speaks to the best hope for humanity itself.So, through one couple’s gesture, many lives are enriched. The actions the Cornetts took will reverberate outwards through history in the form of love and the community they fostered. Bob Cornett is survived by more than just five sons and a loving extended family–he is survived by us all. His actions remind us all of the things that can be built when one dreams of a better world and won’t stop until they make it happen. Rest well sir, you’ve earned it.Our own Rex Thomson, himself a Kentuckian and part of the Suwannee family, made the following video. It’s an attempt to both tell the history of the founding of the Suwannee Music Park and put faces to the names of the couple who built the much loved music mecca.[Video: RexAVision]last_img read more

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Can this union be saved?

first_imgWith congressional Republicans and Democrats arguing over whether the president should be impeached, ever-deepening political and cultural acrimony has turned us into the Divided States of America.Jumping off from The Atlantic’s December issue, “How to Stop a Civil War,” editor in chief and author Jeffrey Goldberg spoke with contributors Danielle Allen, James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard, and Adam Serwer, staff writer at The Atlantic, about the prospects for reconciling our differences and restoring faith in democracy at a JFK Jr. Forum on Tuesday evening.Allen, a political theorist who runs the Democratic Knowledge Project, said “fragmentation” is the biggest danger to American democracy today. Voters are becoming more geographically, culturally, and socially disconnected, retreating further into ideological and informational silos. Similarly self-governing structures like the U.S. Congress, which rely on cooperation and consensus, find themselves able to agree on very little, she said. The inability to get anything done erodes the faith of voters in democratic institutions, creating an environment demagogues can exploit. Healthy, well-functioning democracies require that individuals sometimes set aside specific preferences for the sake of the greater good, so if we are to be ‘a more perfect union,’ the country needs to prioritize ‘union,’ Allen argued.Serwer writes frequently about race and is best known for his critique of the Trump administration’s immigration policies, concluding “the cruelty is the point.” He attributes the nation’s current climate of incivility, particularly in political discourse, as one that stems ultimately from still-unresolved issues over race.“This question of reconciliation should not be prized over the survival of liberal democracy itself the way it was more than 100 years ago” during the Civil War, said Serwer, a fellow at the Shorenstein Center for Media, Politics, and Public Policy last spring. “How we end polarization, the terms on which it ends, are far more important than the fact that it ends.”,The rightward shift of the Republican Party, particularly since Trump’s election, is a direct reaction to demographic and cultural changes in the country that aren’t going anywhere, making a path to reconciliation very difficult, said Serwer.“I think the big obstacle to this is that you have a faction of people in the United States who really feel like they are fighting an existential battle against annihilation,” a misguided notion “that the president has cultivated to a tremendous advantage. So they don’t feel like they can lose because if they lose, it’s over,” he said. “So it doesn’t matter what Donald Trump does; it doesn’t matter whether he breaks the law; it doesn’t matter whether he violates the Constitution. He’s the only one standing between you and total Armageddon.”Serwer added: “I honestly don’t know how we resolve that in a way that makes people feel as though they are not fighting for their lives — because they’re not. I think they simply just do not want to relinquish the power that they are used to holding for themselves and have for 200 years.”Allen agreed that “reconciliation that does not include everyone isn’t reconciliation,” but added that there are meaningful reforms that can be made to our democratic institutions, including a “dysfunctional” Congress. However, when we consider changes, it’s important that we build structures “that make it worthwhile to keep investing in this process of doing work together,” she said.Historically, under the two-party system, political polarization de-escalates only when one side loses power and then repositions itself so its views are in line with the greatest number of voters. But with gerrymandering and other rules in place, parties today can retain power without attaining a majority, eliminating the need to recalibrate their ideological stances, Allen said.Restoring Congress so that it better represents the voice of the people through ideas like ranked voter choice, which would have a moderating influence, and forcing candidates to move away from scorched-Earth campaign strategies or lose votes could be a start, Allen said. Bringing back civic education, so students learn how institutions are supposed to work, see their inherent value, and understand the vital role citizens have to play in civic life, is also important. Whatever the changes, they will likely occur at the state and municipal levels, not the federal, she said. Veterans of past battles offer insiders’ looks into the politics, procedure, and strategy of investigators and lawmakers Related Sunstein on impeachment Clinton, Nixon, and lessons in preparing for impeachmentcenter_img Leaders of a sidelined political philosophy explain why its principles and goals remain critically important The conservative quandary In new book, Harvard law professor explains the centrality of a cautious process that helps to ensure America thrives last_img read more

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