Students to participate in mock interviews at Dalloway’s Coffeehouse, prepare for career and internship opportunities

first_imgSaint Mary’s students will gather in Dalloway’s Coffeehouse on Wednesday to participate in “Mock Interview Day,” an event hosted by the Career Crossings Office. Angela Fitzpatrick, the office’s assistant director, organized this career development opportunity with the hope that students would become more familiar with job-interviewing skills.Fitzpatrick and the rest of the Career Crossings Office have been planning different spring programs since before winter break. “Mock interviews was one [event] we decided we could try to make happen because more and more we’re seeing students who need practice,” she said. Students who will be attending the mock interviews will gain an advantage in their interviewing skills, Fitzpatrick added. “The more they practice, then the more confident they’ll be and professional,” she said.Fitzpatrick utilized Saint Mary’s employer relations to reach out to off-campus human resources professionals, and invited them to participate in Mock Interview Day. These experts will ensure that participants experience a realistic interview scenario, she said. “There are HR, talent acquisition managers … that actually are HR people who interview and screen people,” Fitzpatrick said. “That’s who we have actually doing the mock interviews.” Throughout the month of January, students received multiple emails from the Career Crossings Office inviting them to RSVP for the event through a Google form. Students were asked to upload their resumes, select interview times and answer questions based on their interests and goals. Each mock interview is split into two sections: 30 minutes of interviewing and 15 minutes of feedback and questions and answers.Tammy Wever, the administrative assistant of the Career Crossings Office, will prepare folders — containing the student’s resume and specific questions pertaining to their major — for the HR professionals to use as a resource during interviews.Each professional will interview three or four Saint Mary’s students. In regards to preparation, Fitzpatrick said students have been visiting the Career Crossings Office throughout the week asking for tips and having their resume’s looked at. Junior Emma Schramko is one of the students participating in tomorrow’s event. “I encouraged myself to sign up because I thought it was a unique and beneficial opportunity, unlike anything else I have ever participated in,” said junior Emma Schramko, one of the students participating in tomorrow’s event. Schramko said the event can provide students with a feeling of comfort and familiarity as they prepare for a real job interview in the future. “I hope to gain a new level of comfort from sitting through a mock interview in a place that I am comfortable and familiar with [at Saint Mary’s],” she said. Tags: Career Crossings Office, Dalloway’s Coffeehouse, Mock Interviewslast_img read more

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A Paler Green.

first_img This year is an especially heavy fruiting year for redcedars. Many female redcedars appear bluish-green because of their dense cone load. Photo: Dan Rahn The bluish-green of redcedar cones framed by the dark green of the foliage make for a unique image. Female redcedar cones are one-fourth of an inch thick. They’re greenish-blue to blue, with a whitish, waxy coating. The cones form in the fall, become receptive the following spring, and disseminate seeds by fall. Cones, Not Berries Anywhere there are sunlight and little competition, redcedars may be found. Their seeds are spread by birds and so are found growing in the most unlikely places. The problem scientists have with the common-language term is simple. A family of trees found around the world is correctly called “cedar,” and redcedar is not one of them. Simply put, redcedar isn’t a cedar. In fact, it has few things in common with true cedars. (Editor’s Note: the tree in this article is normally referred to as “red cedar.” The 14th through 16th paragraphs explain the lexical variation and the use here of the term “redcedar.”) For now, the bluish-green of redcedar cones framed by the dark green of the foliage make for a unique image in forested landscapes. Redcedar is a small to medium-size tree with a dense crown. It’s slow-growing and reaches sexual maturity after 10 years, with a maximum life span of three centuries. Widespread Conifer Summer brings an infinite range of green colors. This summer a rare event brings more colors to the eye: female redcedars are producing a heavy cone crop. Inside each redcedar cone are one to three seeds. These seeds are covered in resin and contain a strong growth inhibitor which can delay germination up to three years. The whitish coating over a dark blue cone helps produce a variety of colors in mature trees. Photo: Dan Rahn Female redcedars produce some cones every year, with large crops every third year. And some years, like this summer, redcedars produce an extra abundance of cones.center_img Redcedar is a dioecious tree, meaning each tree is only male or female. Male redcedars produce pollen, which the wind carries away. Female redcedars produce small, round cones, which are sometimes mistakenly called berries and are used to flavor gin. Photo: Dan Rahn Framed by a giant oak in the background, the female redcedar on the right is a lighter shade of green than the male redcedar on the left. The difference comes from the female’s extra abundance of pale, bluish green cones. The dense seed production this year means that redcedar cone-eating birds will have a fall and winter bonanza. It also means that the next few years will produce a host of little cedars in flower beds, forest edges and vacant lots. The tree can germinate and grow for a short time on many soils, but is outcompeted by shrubs and trees. Mature redcedars are found in places where other trees find it hard to grow. Redcedar is the most widely growing conifer tree in the eastern United States. The country has about a dozen native species. The Western hemisphere is home to 25 species. The world has about 60. Juniper, Not Cedar To request high-resolution images, click here. In forestry and other scientific disciplines, the tree known as “redcedar” — one word — refers specifically to tree-size plants in the Juniperus genus. In the common language, these juniper trees are known as “red cedar” — two words. The most comprehensive dictionaries note other commonly used terms for the same trees, such as “red juniper,” “Virginia cedar” and “cedar.” The leaves and wood of redcedar contain special oils that are used in perfumes and medicines. The smell of a cedar chest or cedar-lined closet comes from these oils. The wood resists decay and is durable. Two Georgia Redcedars Georgians are blessed with two common redcedar species: eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana) and Southern redcedar (Juniperus silicicola). The Southern species is found closely hugging the coast on deep sands. The eastern redcedar is found throughout the rest of eastern North America. Redcedar is a rough-looking, pointy-scaled and stringy-barked tree. It’s found along well-lighted edges of the woods, fencerows and in open, forgotten areas.last_img read more

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Brazilian Army Helps Bring Internet to Western Amazon

first_img“Underwater fiber optic transmission technology is already in use in the maritime environment, but the dynamic in river environments is less well known,” he said. The project, carried out April 7-8, is part of Amazônia Conectada (Connected Amazon), which seeks to bring the Internet to regions where this technology is rare or even nonexistent, installing five new information highways along the beds of the Negro, Solimões, Purus, Juruá and Madeira rivers. It will benefit 4 million people living in 52 municipalities, according to the head of the Amazônia Conectada Program and head of the of the Army Integrated Telematics Center (CITEx), Major General Decílio de Medeiros Sales. Nearly 40 percent of the cocaine and crack that comes across the border into Brazil is from Peru, according to the 2013 UNODC World Drug Report. In addition, Brazil is an important transit point for cocaine trafficking mainly to Europe and West Africa. The minimum annual cost of the violence associated with drug trafficking in Brazil is 54.2 billion reals ($17.7 million), according to the Institute for Applied Economic Research (IPEA) and the Brazilian Ministry of Justice. “The intention is to cover the entire Western Amazon region over a span of 7,800 kilometers, where more than 90% of the population lives on the banks of rivers. The Army will only use one-thousandth of the installed fiber optic transmission capacity. This small amount is enough to meet the needs of the military in the region.” The five information highways planned under the program are expected to be completed by the end of 2017. Municipalities such as São Gabriel da Cachoeira, located 852 kilometers from Manaus on the border with Colombia and Venezuela, and Benjamin Constant, bordering Peru and more than 1,600 kilometers from Manaus via river transport, will become connected to the World Wide Web. The budget for the program is approximately 1 billion Brazilian reals ($330 million). The initial infrastructure construction phase, which is underway, received a 15 million reals ($ 4.88 million) investment from the Brazilian Army, through Sisfron. The financing necessary for ongoing work is expected to come from the federal and Amazonas State governments, as well as public and private organizations interested in using the infrastructure installed by the program. After the initial phase is complete, probably by December, the program will begin its pilot project, which will cover a much greater distance of approximately 220 kilometers, passing through the Solimões River and connecting the cities of Coari and Tefé. The location was chosen because it allows for a continuation of the fiber optic infrastructure already in place between Manaus and the municipality of Coari. The five information highways planned under the program are expected to be completed by the end of 2017. Governance and sustainability model brings together various partners By Dialogo April 20, 2015 The installation of the first fiber optic cable on the bed of the Rio Negro, in the Brazilian state of Amazonas, is a first step towards internet connectivity in the country’s Western Amazon. Program brings benefits for national defense and for the local population For the riverside communities, meanwhile, the arrival of broadband Internet connection will provide major benefits. With this technology, many services that now require a trip to the state capital will be able to be handled from the locality itself or from cities that are closer than Manaus. Combatting drug trafficking along the border The budget for the program is approximately 1 billion Brazilian reals ($330 million). The initial infrastructure construction phase, which is underway, received a 15 million reals ($ 4.88 million) investment from the Brazilian Army, through Sisfron. The financing necessary for ongoing work is expected to come from the federal and Amazonas State governments, as well as public and private organizations interested in using the infrastructure installed by the program. In addition, the Amazon is the only environment of its kind in the world, and each river has its own characteristics and behaves in certain ways. The Rio Negro, for example, has very dark waters and its bed has a complex relief. Therefore, the exploration and discovery phase is essential to ensuring that the infrastructure is installed in the safest and most effective manner. The infrastructure is intended to remain in place for 25 years. Initial stage studies underwater river environment for better cable installation The installation of the first fiber optic cable on the bed of the Rio Negro, in the Brazilian state of Amazonas, is a first step towards internet connectivity in the country’s Western Amazon. The project, carried out April 7-8, is part of Amazônia Conectada (Connected Amazon), which seeks to bring the Internet to regions where this technology is rare or even nonexistent, installing five new information highways along the beds of the Negro, Solimões, Purus, Juruá and Madeira rivers. It will benefit 4 million people living in 52 municipalities, according to the head of the Amazônia Conectada Program and head of the of the Army Integrated Telematics Center (CITEx), Major General Decílio de Medeiros Sales. Municipalities such as São Gabriel da Cachoeira, located 852 kilometers from Manaus on the border with Colombia and Venezuela, and Benjamin Constant, bordering Peru and more than 1,600 kilometers from Manaus via river transport, will become connected to the World Wide Web. “The intention is to cover the entire Western Amazon region over a span of 7,800 kilometers, where more than 90% of the population lives on the banks of rivers. The Army will only use one-thousandth of the installed fiber optic transmission capacity. This small amount is enough to meet the needs of the military in the region.” The telecommunications infrastructure will serve the interests both of the Brazilian Army in its efforts to monitor the border through the Integrated Border Monitoring System (Sisfron), as well as that of the Amazonas State government, which will be able to bring systems managing the state’s public policies into the state’s interior. The section where the cable was installed connects the Brazilian Army’s 4th Area Telematics Center (CTA) with its 4th Survey Division (DL). From April 8-22, in close partnership with other participating program institutions, the Military ground force has been monitoring the installed structure and the performance of the electronic transmission, and making any necessary adjustments for its optimal operation. Program brings benefits for national defense and for the local populationcenter_img After the initial phase is complete, probably by December, the program will begin its pilot project, which will cover a much greater distance of approximately 220 kilometers, passing through the Solimões River and connecting the cities of Coari and Tefé. The location was chosen because it allows for a continuation of the fiber optic infrastructure already in place between Manaus and the municipality of Coari. Governance and sustainability model brings together various partners The section where the cable was installed connects the Brazilian Army’s 4th Area Telematics Center (CTA) with its 4th Survey Division (DL). From April 8-22, in close partnership with other participating program institutions, the Military ground force has been monitoring the installed structure and the performance of the electronic transmission, and making any necessary adjustments for its optimal operation. High-speed Internet also will invigorate the economy and the tourist trade. Maj. Gen. Sales cited the example of banks, which will be able to use the Internet to better provide their services to residents of the Amazon and tourists who visit the region. The telecommunications infrastructure will serve the interests both of the Brazilian Army in its efforts to monitor the border through the Integrated Border Monitoring System (Sisfron), as well as that of the Amazonas State government, which will be able to bring systems managing the state’s public policies into the state’s interior. For the riverside communities, meanwhile, the arrival of broadband Internet connection will provide major benefits. With this technology, many services that now require a trip to the state capital will be able to be handled from the locality itself or from cities that are closer than Manaus. The program’s initial phase – which corresponds with the installation of cable along a portion of the Rio Negro between the 4th CTA and the 4th DL – is being referred to as a “technology demonstrator.” The cable spans 7.5 kilometers in the river and approximately 2.5 additional kilometers over land. Maj. Gen. Sales explained that this stage is essential because it provides an opportunity to study an appropriate solution for managing the operational infrastructure. Combatting drug trafficking along the border High-speed Internet also will invigorate the economy and the tourist trade. Maj. Gen. Sales cited the example of banks, which will be able to use the Internet to better provide their services to residents of the Amazon and tourists who visit the region. The program’s initial phase – which corresponds with the installation of cable along a portion of the Rio Negro between the 4th CTA and the 4th DL – is being referred to as a “technology demonstrator.” The cable spans 7.5 kilometers in the river and approximately 2.5 additional kilometers over land. Maj. Gen. Sales explained that this stage is essential because it provides an opportunity to study an appropriate solution for managing the operational infrastructure. “The Army is responsible for the installation of the fiber optic infrastructure in the rivers, but the provision of the services through the new technology will be handled by the agencies that operate the country’s communications system,” Maj. Gen. Sales explained. “The Army is responsible for the installation of the fiber optic infrastructure in the rivers, but the provision of the services through the new technology will be handled by the agencies that operate the country’s communications system,” Maj. Gen. Sales explained. Initial stage studies underwater river environment for better cable installation The investment of 1 billion reals ($330 million) for the Amazônia Conectada Program represents less than 2 percent of this cost, and the area benefiting from the arrival of the technology that will allow for closer monitoring of the border is located near the countries responsible for more than 80 percent of the world’s coca production (Peru and Colombia), the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) said. Amazônia Conectada is an initiative of the Brazilian Army in partnership with the government of Amazonas State, the National Education and Research Network (RNP), the Amazonas Data Processing Company (PRODAM), and the Amazonas Environmental Protection Institute (IPAAM). Public and private companies are also taking part. This institutional arrangement seeks to ensure that the program has both governance and sustainability models. In addition, the Amazon is the only environment of its kind in the world, and each river has its own characteristics and behaves in certain ways. The Rio Negro, for example, has very dark waters and its bed has a complex relief. Therefore, the exploration and discovery phase is essential to ensuring that the infrastructure is installed in the safest and most effective manner. The infrastructure is intended to remain in place for 25 years. The investment of 1 billion reals ($330 million) for the Amazônia Conectada Program represents less than 2 percent of this cost, and the area benefiting from the arrival of the technology that will allow for closer monitoring of the border is located near the countries responsible for more than 80 percent of the world’s coca production (Peru and Colombia), the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) said. The minimum annual cost of the violence associated with drug trafficking in Brazil is 54.2 billion reals ($17.7 million), according to the Institute for Applied Economic Research (IPEA) and the Brazilian Ministry of Justice. The arrival of the telecommunications infrastructure to the triple border shared with Colombia and Peru will also allow for greater control over the entry of illicit goods into Brazil by improving the functionality of Sisfron. That Army project, which will install sensors at points along the border and use radar and aerial vehicles to monitor the region, relies mainly on the Internet to transmit information from its equipment. The arrival of the telecommunications infrastructure to the triple border shared with Colombia and Peru will also allow for greater control over the entry of illicit goods into Brazil by improving the functionality of Sisfron. That Army project, which will install sensors at points along the border and use radar and aerial vehicles to monitor the region, relies mainly on the Internet to transmit information from its equipment. “Underwater fiber optic transmission technology is already in use in the maritime environment, but the dynamic in river environments is less well known,” he said. Amazônia Conectada is an initiative of the Brazilian Army in partnership with the government of Amazonas State, the National Education and Research Network (RNP), the Amazonas Data Processing Company (PRODAM), and the Amazonas Environmental Protection Institute (IPAAM). Public and private companies are also taking part. This institutional arrangement seeks to ensure that the program has both governance and sustainability models. Nearly 40 percent of the cocaine and crack that comes across the border into Brazil is from Peru, according to the 2013 UNODC World Drug Report. In addition, Brazil is an important transit point for cocaine trafficking mainly to Europe and West Africa. THE BRAZILIAN “FAA” IS THE SALVATION OF OUR COUNTRY!last_img read more

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