Students make cards for Sullivan family

first_imgStudent government delivered more than 200 letters from members of the Notre Dame community to the family of junior Declan Sullivan on Monday, student body chief of staff Nick Ruof said. “The Notre Dame family is truly a family and it was shown over these past few days,” Ruof said. “Everyone came together to be arm-in-arm together in support.” Student government wanted to allow students to show their support for the Sullivan family after Sullivan’s death, Ruof said. In a Thursday e-mail, student body president Catherine Soler and student body vice president Andrew Bell invited students to bring notes and cards to their office in LaFortune Student Center. “As student government we wanted a cohesive effort to send things to the family instead of berating them with mail,” Ruof said. “We wanted a unified student body response to the Sullivan family.” The Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore donated 200 cards that were available at the reception following Thursday’s Mass of Remembrance in honor of Sullivan. The remaining cards were later available in the student government office, and they were all used, according to Bell. Students also placed many other envelopes in the collection box, Bell said. Student government collected cards throughout the weekend so students had time to reflect, Ruof said. “We wanted to be a place for students to send their sympathies through us to the family,” Ruof said. Ruof said the fact that many students who did not know Sullivan wrote letters to his family represents the manner in which the student body has united following Wednesday’s accident. “We want to let the Sullivan family grieve,” Ruof said. “We want to give them their privacy but facilitate the student body’s sympathies to the family at the same time.” Bell said the University provided buses to transport students, football players, student athletic managers and videographers from campus to Sullivan’s funeral in Buffalo Grove, Ill. Monday. Various administrators, deans and representatives of Student Affairs were also present at Monday’s funeral Mass, Bell said. The University is looking to work with Fisher Hall and the Financial Management Board to create a memorial scholarship in Declan’s name, Ruof said. “We want to show support for the family as well as for the men of Fisher and the women of Lewis,” Ruof said. Ruof said student government would also organize a tribute to Sullivan during the home game against Utah on Nov. 13 to show continued support in the Notre Dame community for Sullivan’s family.last_img read more

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EMV goes live: What to expect

first_imgIn the coming months, EMV security technology will begin appearing at many of the nation’s checkout counters as merchants work diligently to meet U.S. EMV liability shift set by Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover.While full U.S conversion to EMV technology may take years to achieve, many of the country’s big-box merchants have already implemented EMV-enabled payment terminals, and a long list of others promises to follow suit by the end of the year.“For the most part, consumers today are carrying around at least one card with an EMV chip embedded in it,” said Michelle Thornton, director of product development for CO-OP Financial Services. “And now that merchant adoption of the technology is moving forward, we are beginning to see how EMV is working in the marketplace and what consumers can expect going forward at the point of sale.”Early Adoption at High-Volume MerchantsIndustry experts predict that around 50 percent of U.S. payment terminals will be EMV-capable by year-end, and approximately 19 percent will be EMV-enabled. However, Thornton emphasizes that these numbers don’t tell the whole story.“For example, if Walmart has all its EMV terminals up and running at a certain point, this alone can skew the data,” she said. “What is trending now is early adoption among high-volume merchants that have the most to lose in the event of a security breach, and that represents a large portion of the market. Interestingly, we are also seeing a segment of small merchants up and running with EMV due to their processors’ ‘EMV packaging’ and readiness.”Consumers can also expect payment terminals to be upgraded in phases, with adoption of EMV debit lagging behind credit because of regulatory complexities surrounding EMV debit transactions.“While we expect the majority of merchants to implement EMV technology much sooner for credit than for debit, we are seeing some instances where merchants are enabling both credit and debit transactions in the early stages of EMV deployment,” said Thornton. “The fact that PIN debit transactions are generally more profitable for merchants may be prompting this move. However, regardless of why it is happening, large retailers are adopting EMV technology for debit as quickly as they can.”Another market dynamic consumers may notice is a delay in EMV adoption at the gas pump. “The EMV liability shift for gas stations doesn’t go into effect until 2017,” said Thornton. “So consumers can expect to continue swiping cards when they purchase gas in the near term.”EMV Terminals Come in Many FlavorsWhile EMV technology is regarded globally as the universal security standard for card-present payments, Thornton notes that EMV payment terminals come in a wide range of configurations. “There are different manufacturers of EMV terminals, and different types of EMV terminals from each manufacturer,” she said. “Plus, each payment terminal has to tie into the back-end processing systems of the merchant implementing it, and this can involve a fair amount of software customization.”Consider also that many organizations are phasing in EMV technology incrementally. “This means that consumers may have to wait for some common payment options to be enabled,” she said. “For example, although you were able to check the ‘cash back’ box at your local grocery store’s mag stripe terminal last week, this feature may not be available yet on the new EMV terminal,” she said. “But it may be operational a few weeks from now. So consumers can expect a certain degree of inconsistency in the way EMV terminals function, especially at first.”What is consistent about EMV technology is that transactions take a bit longer than mag stripe transactions. “It can be just a few seconds longer in many cases, but people will notice it,” said Thornton. “These are all things consumers should know, and as a credit union you can show your industry expertise and commitment to members by educating them. We recommend impressing upon members the added security benefits of EMV technology and advising them to expect a learning curve when first using their new EMV cards. Ultimately, the benefits of EMV technology extend to all of us and are well worth the inconvenience initially.”For more information on what to expect during the transition to EMV, listen to our recent webinar, A New Era in Security after the EMV Liability Shift. 39SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Bill Prichard Bill Prichard is Senior Manager, Public Relations and Corporate Communications, for CO-OP Financial Services (www.co-opfs.org), Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., a financial technology provider to credit unions. Prichard can be … Web: www.co-opfs.org Detailslast_img read more

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Cliffs on track in Railway

first_img There was little to choose between the pair passing the two-furlong marker, but Painted Cliffs quickly asserted and was well on top at the finish. Jessica Harrington’s Rockaway Valley was the 11-8 favourite having had the winner well behind him here last month, but was under pressure some way from home before boxing on to beat Log Out Island to the runner-up spot. Moore said: “We took it up far too early really, but he’s a nice horse and he’ll improve. “All Aidan’s two-year-olds are running great at the moment.” O’Brien said: “We liked him before he ever ran but he disappointed the first day and Joseph (O’Brien) said he was very idle and babyish. We put the blinkers on him at Leopardstown to help him concentrate and I wasn’t sure if it was just a bad race or that the blinkers worked. “Ryan said he’s a very nice horse. He likes him. Maybe we could leave the blinkers off him in future.” RaceBets and Paddy Power make Painted Cliffs a 25-1 shot for next year’s 2000 Guineas at Newmarket. Press Association Down the field on debut before getting off the mark at Leopardstown just nine days ago, the Canford Cliffs colt was a 7-1 shot to provide Aidan O’Brien with a 12th triumph in this Group Two contest. Richard Hannon’s British raider Log Out Island took the field along, looking to go one place better than when runner-up in the Norfolk Stakes at Royal Ascot last week, with Painted Cliffs his nearest pursuer. center_img Painted Cliffs and Ryan Moore bounded clear in the GAIN Railway Stakes at the Curragh.last_img read more

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Defense leads Syracuse in dominant 19-7 win over Albany

first_img Published on March 27, 2019 at 8:13 pm Contact Eric: [email protected] | @esblack34 Albany’s bench collectively shouted at its offense as it struggled to get a good look at the goal. They counted down the seconds left on the possession clock.“30! 20! 10!”Its warnings didn’t help the Great Danes, who used 85 of the 90 seconds on the possession clock only to fail to attempt a shot. Instead, a last-ditch pass was deflected and scooped up by Kerry Defliese, who took the ball upfield.One minute later Syracuse turned the turnover into offense, as Nicole Levy recorded her third goal of the game and put the Orange ahead 5-1.No. 3 Syracuse’s (11-2, 3-1 Atlantic Coast) defense led the way in SU’s 12th-straight victory over Albany (5-5, 1-0 America East), 19-7. The Orange still have never lost a game to the Great Danes. And Wednesday marked the fourth-straight time SU held an opponent to single-digit goals — its longest such streak since the start of the 2017 season. Paced by Sarah Cooper, who tied a career-high with five caused turnovers, Syracuse forced Albany into committing more turnovers (18) than shots attempted (10).AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“From the beginning we stepped up,” SU head coach Gary Gait said. “Did what we needed to do in order to have success — the defense getting multiple turnovers.”SU took chances to deflect or intercept Great Danes passes. Ella Simkins whiffed to start the game, missing the ball on a cross-field pass. Her gamble led to Albany’s first goal of the game, but from there on out, the Orange’s defense delivered a nearly flawless performance.Cooper, recently named to the Tewaaraton Award watchlist, was an annoyance to the Great Danes. On one first-half highlight, she timed a jump perfectly and caught the ball in the pocket of her stick.The ball ricocheted out, though, and was picked up by Simkins, who pushed the ball upfield to Emily Hawryschuk. Hawryschuk found Levy, who scored easily to extend Syracuse’s lead.“(Deflecting shots and passes is) a pretty big part,” Cooper said. “To get the knock down and get a ground ball, pick off a pass or something, it’s really important.”The Orange even had defensive contributions from their attackers, as Megan Carney impacted SU’s rides. She caused a turnover when Albany defender Imani Hedgeman was running down the sideline in an attempt to clear the ball.Hedgeman was cornered by Carney and Meaghan Tyrrell and opted to double-back, turning over her left shoulder toward her bench. Carney anticipated the maneuver and smacked the ball out of Hedgeman’s stick. That turnover soon turned into a goal as well, as Morgan Alexander boosted Syracuse’s lead to six a minute later.While the ride aspect of Syracuse’s game has been successful all season, the Orange haven’t had much time to practice it because of their busy schedule. It also takes a lot out of the team, Gait said, so SU can’t dedicate too much time to improve it. Syracuse made a slight change to its ride strategy recently though, a shift that proved impactful on Wednesday against Albany.“We took the pressure off the goalie,” Gait said, “and dropped our four attack back instead of three. Utilized the bumping and shifting a little bit more.”Without having to focus on defending the goalie after offensive possessions, SU’s attackers were able to be more physical with Albany’s defenders. That paid dividends during the middle of the first half, when Hawryschuk forced Lara Podvin into turning the ball over back to SU’s offense, which capitalized again.Later on, a long possession by the Great Danes sparked more possession clock warning chants from their bench. This time, it wound to 10 seconds before Cooper caused another turnover. Fifteen seconds later, Tyrrell extended SU’s lead to seven.Then, it happened again. Cooper forced her fifth turnover, tying her career-high, during an Albany clear attempt. It earned Syracuse possession and two shots at the goal, the second of which was converted by Julie Cross. The midfielder, who scored a career-high three goals, dropped in her final score after a Great Danes turnover in the second half.Albany had been held scoreless for over 10 minutes, and with just 38 seconds left on its possession clock, called a timeout. Whatever play Great Danes head coach and former SU star Katie Rowan drew up failed though, because Albany still struggled to get an open look at the goal. As its bench started to count down again, a fan shouted from the stands, “Shoot! Shoot!” But the Great Danes never got off a shot attempt and were called for a possession clock violation.“We really just got good pressure,” Cooper said. “We got them on their heels, made them frantic, made them make some bad passes. We had our sticks in the way.”The Great Danes never strung together more than two goals in a row and ended up scoring nearly seven goals fewer than their season average. SU never led by fewer than seven after the 5:50 mark in the first half and wound up winning by its largest margin since Feb. 18. But in a game in which the Orange scored their most goals in over a month, it was their defense that made the difference. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Lottery Officials Offer Dollar Incentives to Team Nigeria

first_imgThis financial pledge is coming at a time that both officials and athletes are on the edge waiting for Team Nigeria’s first medal.Meanwhile, all expectations of a possible medal from weightlifting and the women’s 400m events concluded Sunday night yielded no medal.Maryan Usman’s efforts in the +75kg Snatch and Jerk could only place her 9th in the overall ranking while Patience Okon George and Margaret Bamgbose semi final placed them 8th and 7th positions respectively.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram As Team Nigeria continues its search for the first medal at the Olympics in Rio, a delegation of National Lottery Trust Fund and National Lottery Regulatory Commission, led by Habu Gumel and Mr Adophus Ikpe respectively have promised monetary incentives to further propel the country’s athletes to win medals.The delegation who has been supporting Team Nigeria equally announced $2,000 for any athlete who wins gold while a silver medallist would be rewarded with $1,500 and bronze winner with $1,000.last_img read more

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