SRP to build massive 250MW/1,000MWh battery storage project in Arizona

first_imgSRP to build massive 250MW/1,000MWh battery storage project in Arizona FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Arizona Republic:Salt River Project will build the biggest battery on the power grid in Arizona as part of its pledge last year to add 1,000 megawatts of solar to its supply by 2025. The big battery project is planned for the Little Rainbow Valley, south of Buckeye, and the battery system there will be many times larger than anything in Arizona today.Utilities are adding batteries to the power grid so that they can charge with abundant solar energy in the day, and discharge that power at night, when customers use a lot of electricity but solar plants don’t create any. SRP said last year it would reduce its reliance on natural-gas-burning power plants and save money by adding solar and batteries to its system.At the time, SRP only had about 200 megawatts of solar, but now the electric utility has lined up projects that get it about 60% of the way toward that 1,000-megawatt goal.The 250-megawatt project will be called Sonoran Energy Center. It will include batteries capable of storing 250 megawatts of energy for four hours, or 1,000 megawatt-hours of electricity storage.The U.S. Energy Information Administration reported that as of March 2019, the two biggest operating battery projects in the country are the 40-megawatt Golden Valley Electric Association’s system in Alaska and the Vista Energy system in California.Batteries give electric companies flexibility in how they deliver the power. For example, the Sonoran Energy Center also could provide 125 megawatts of power for eight hours.More: SRP plans to install Arizona’s biggest battery for massive solar plantlast_img read more

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Keeping your collections operation compliant

first_imgEnsuring that your collections operation is compliant with the various state and federal regulations is no easy task. You’re required to have policies and procedures in place to ensure that your team is operating under the law, and processes to identify situations in which guidelines are not being followed so that you can address and correct any issues or potential violations.Financial institutions, large and small, are more vulnerable than ever to regulatory scrutiny. The main culprit is the “potential” compliance scrutiny they face from state and federal regulatory audits. In this article, we’ll address the problems lenders face within the realm of compliance, and provide tips on identifying potential violations.There’s No Getting Around Compliance in CollectionsLet’s begin by addressing a couple of the “facts of life” for lenders: Lending inevitably leads to collections, and collections inevitably leads to additional compliance obligations.Whether lenders manage their collections completely in-house, outsource a portion, or outsource all of their collection work, maintaining compliance with the various federal and state laws is critical in order to avoid legal action, regulatory fines, and a loss of reputation.The best way to stay out of trouble is to be well informed. Let’s take a look atthree specific regulations that are most relevant to the compliance industry.Unfair, Deceptive, or Abusive Acts or Practices (UDAAPs)This overarching and comprehensive set of legislation prohibits firms offering financial services from engaging in unfair, deceptive, or abusive acts or practices. This has been of particular concern in the collections business, where it is essentially the consumer who determines if they’ve been treated unfairly.For a collection operation, the best line of defense against UDAAP violations is to be proactive. The first step in preventing UDAAPs (and remaining compliant with all collection regulations) is to ensure you have a well-documented, formalized policies and procedures manual. A well-defined manual gives your collections staff a guide and reference for expectations and guidelines. It should be organized, repeatable, and easily accessible to all necessary personnel.Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA)The FDCPA was designed to eliminate abusive, deceptive, and unfair debt collection practices by collection agencies. The act restricts the time and frequency of calls, as well as the tactics available to a collector. It also requires certain conduct of debt collectors, like providing verification of debt and giving the name and address of the original creditor.Collection operations have one job when it comes to the FDCPA—make sure collectors are properly trained and certified, and are operating under the rules for every borrower interaction. Proper training would cover the guidelines under which debt collectors may conduct business, define rights of consumers involved with debt collectors, and prescribe penalties and remedies for violations of the Act.Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA)The TCPA was enacted to protect consumers from unwanted telemarketing calls. Regulators have expanded the protections over the years, to include restrictions of cellular phone calls. Companies found in violation of TCPA rules pay dearly, with fines of $500 to $1,500 per violation. According to JDSpura, “In 2018, TCPA lawsuits remained one of the most filed types of class actions in courts across the country.”Minimizing TCPA violations requires thorough and on-going employee training and technology. Having technology in place that scrubs cell phone numbers from calling lists can greatly reduce the chances of calling an unauthorized cell phone number.Compliance has become an even greater priority for lenders and collection agencies because consumer behavior has shifted. Consumers are digitally connected, more informed, less loyal, and more demanding. And, they’re not afraid to voice their complaints in places like the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) online forums. These forums give consumers a quick and easy way to voice their complaints about things like debt collectors.Have you evaluated your financial institution’s collections operation lately?If you’d like to learn how outsourcing some or all of your collections work to us could not only put you ahead of the regulatory curve, but help you reduce delinquencies and increase collection cure rates, download our collections comparison guide today! 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Amy Bailey Amy Bailey is the Director of Compliance with primary responsibilities of supporting, developing and managing compliance policies and procedures to ensure business operations are conducted in compliance with regulatory and … Detailslast_img read more

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Dodgers envision Kenta Maeda pitching high-leverage relief innings in October

first_imgLOS ANGELES – Three weeks remain in the regular season, and the Dodgers are still tinkering with their bullpen. Kenta Maeda served as a long reliever Sunday against the San Francisco Giants, the second consecutive game in which he’s filled that role. He pitched four scoreless innings, allowed one single, walked none, and struck out six.That is not the role Maeda will fill in October.“In the postseason, Kenta’s value essentially is to be available every game,” Manager Dave Roberts said. “So a long guy is not Kenta. Kenta should pitch leverage innings in the postseason, very important innings.”None of this is new, of course. Maeda has taken on high-leverage relief roles in each of the last two postseasons after starting for most of the regular season. However, this is the most precisely Roberts has defined Maeda’s role going forward, after previously leaving open the possibility that Maeda might start again in 2019. Rich Hill is returning from the injured list to start Thursday against the Baltimore Orioles. He joins a rotation that already included Walker Buehler, Clayton Kershaw and Tony Gonsolin. Ross Stripling is making a spot start for Hyun-Jin Ryu on Wednesday, giving the Dodgers at least six possible starters in addition to Maeda. Julio Urías, who started Sunday, is moving back to the bullpen during the road trip.Roberts believes that moving Maeda to a relief role allows him to “let the tank out.”“His aggressiveness from the first pitch was evident,” Roberts said of Maeda’s performance against the Giants. “With his stuff – the fastball, the slider – when he’s going to go two or three innings, or one inning, everything’s going to play up.”For his part, Maeda disagreed with the notion that his stuff has been better as a relief pitcher. But he welcomed the role that awaits him in October.“Just being relied upon feels good,” Maeda said through his interpreter. “The nature of a playoff game, everyone’s going to be needed. Everyone’s going to contribute.” “If you look at (Kelly’s) stuff, it was still really good last night,” Roberts said. “It’s not a red flag for us, but as you gear toward the postseason you want to feel right in the body, which also leads to mechanics. … Every throw, every delivery is different. It’s subtle to the eye.”ALSOThe Double-A Tulsa Drillers won beat the Arkansas Travelers, 5-1, keeping their season alive. Starting pitcher Edwin Uceta allowed one run over six innings and Luis Vazquez recorded a three-inning save. Tulsa plays Amarillo in Game 1 of the Texas League Championship Series beginning Tuesday. … In Game 2 of a best-of-three playoff series, Single-A Great Lakes lost 6-4 to the South Bend Cubs, ending their season in the second round of the Midwest League playoffs. Great Lakes left nine men on base and went 1 for 11 with runners in scoring position.UP NEXTThe Dodgers are off Monday Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco center_img Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire TURNER AVOIDS SUSPENSIONJustin Turner successfully appealed his one-game suspension for making contact with umpire Rob Drake immediately following the Dodgers’ Aug. 26 game in San Diego. Turner still owes Major League Baseball an undisclosed fine, but he will not have to miss a game.Turner didn’t play Sunday anyway. Roberts said the 34-year-old third baseman has been dealing with a sore ankle ever since he dove to stop a ground ball off the bat of Jeff Samardzija in the fourth inning Friday. Roberts said he expects Turner to be in the starting lineup Tuesday in Baltimore.Turner is hitting .291 with 27 home runs and 67 RBIs in 131 games this season.INJURY UPDATESMax Muncy played long toss and ran the bases on the field prior to Sunday’s game at Dodger Stadium. Behind the scenes, he is taking swings in preparation for a return to the starting lineup Friday against the New York Mets.Joe Kelly pitched a scoreless seventh inning Saturday after a five-day layoff. The right-hander missed the previous five days because of an injury to his lower body. Roberts said that Kelly is still dealing with inconsistencies in his delivery as a result of the injury.Related Articles Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies last_img read more

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