Faculty invited to seek January grants

first_imgHarvard faculty may want to start thinking about winter this summer: The President’s January Innovation Fund for Faculty begins accepting new applications on Sept. 1.Launched last year, the fund provides grants to faculty across Harvard to develop and implement creative learning experiences for students during Winter Break. Many of the programs supported in the fund’s first year involved interdisciplinary experiences led by faculty from more than one School, the kind of collaboration that President Drew Faust wants to encourage across campus.“The creativity and depth of the programs proposed in the January Innovation Fund’s inaugural year were impressive,” said Faust. “The experiences supported by the fund involve small cohorts — often 10 students or fewer — so they provide opportunities for increased interaction with faculty, often outside the classroom.”Faculty throughout the University may apply for funding, but on-campus proposals that target undergraduates must be limited to Optional Winter Activities Week (OWAW), Jan. 13-22. (Off-campus programs may extend over the entire Winter Break period.)“The programs supported by the January Innovation Fund are a key component of OWAW,” said Harvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds, the Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African American Studies. “Faculty-led learning experiences complement the student-led activities that are at the heart of the week’s programming. I look forward to seeing the proposals for Winter Break 2012.”In general, the fund gives preference to proposals that emphasize innovative methods and models of teaching and learning, interdisciplinary work, research, international experiences, or public and community service.  Large-scale programs involving significant costs are most likely to be successful if they are co-funded with other sponsors.  All proposals must have a faculty sponsor, and award winners are required to submit a summary report that evaluates the effectiveness of the program in meeting its goals.Applications should include a description of activities, a budget, information on the cost of student participation, and letters of commitment from participating faculty. The deadline for submission is Sept. 21, with notification of funding beginning Oct. 24. Faculty are encouraged to visit the fund website for a complete description of the program, the application process, and the criteria for selection.Last winter, the January Innovation Fund for Faculty supported 12 programs, including a study of public health in Brazil, a course on human rights in Ghana, and geology fieldwork in the Grand Canyon. Another program took students to Washington, D.C., to participate in an Ethiopian Christmas celebration at the largest Ethiopian Orthodox Church outside the African nation.Closer to home, the fund supported a preparatory course to conduct qualitative research in communities in the United States and abroad, an investigation of shelters and lifting devices in disaster relief efforts, and a workshop on mapmaking, spatial analysis, and spatial thinking. The program also funded an innovative course on reading and conserving the New England landscape, held at the 3,500-acre Harvard Forest in Petersham, Mass. For six days, a group of 10 undergraduates from a range of concentrations strapped on snowshoes to explore beaver lodges, learn about local botany, and pull an icy sample from a frozen bog for a hands-on lesson in “paleoecology.”“The students brought a range of perspectives to the course activities,” said Clarisse Hart, outreach and education manager for the Harvard Forest. “From social studies to organismic and evolutionary biology, you could see the threads of their Harvard education showing up in the creative work that they did.”Jelle Zijlstra ’13 concentrates in folklore and mythology, but has an interest in the natural world. He said the Harvard Forest course allowed him to gain some experience with field biology and to develop an appreciation of the local countryside.“We had to walk on snowshoes all the time, a first for most of us,” said the Mather House resident. “The many long hikes through the snowy forest were amazing. I learned to understand the history of the New England landscape, a history that I was mostly unaware of.”last_img read more

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Balanced attack leads UW

first_imgIn the Badgers rout of UW-Green Bay Tuesday, Wisconsindisplayed an impressive line of scoring across the board. In the victory, allfive Badger starters scored in double digits for the first time this season.Wisconsin’s last game against Air Force saw four UW playersscored in double digits, but this time even more players got involved,including Teah Gant, who was penciled in to the starting lineup just minutesbefore game time.”[We had] great sharing of the basketball, tremendousbalanced scoring, a great lift by Teah Gant, five in double figures is big forus,” UW head coach Lisa Stone said. “Jolene [Anderson] goes to third in theall-time scoring list… It goes on and on.”Though the Badgers shot a dreadful 38.1 percent from thefree-throw line, the team displayed a quick pick-and-roll offense that thePhoenix could not seem to stop.The balanced scoring attack also came as a result ofUW-Green Bay’s 23 turnovers, and even with the Badgers dominating the game inthe turnover category, Janese Banks saw the balanced scoring as a key toWisconsin’s success.”It allows us to know that we can count on our teammates,”Banks said. “We know that we can step up. I thought Danielle [Ward] had a greatnight, I thought Teah came in and played very well. … I think that when youget all starters in double digits, … I think they know that they just can’tcount on me and Jolene, they have to respect every player on the floor…”Team defense was also vital for the Badgers, holding the Phoenixto 35-percent shooting in the second half to turn what was a winnable game forGreen Bay into a trouncing at the hands of Wisconsin.UW-Green Bay head coach Matt Bollant attributed theturnovers and Wisconsin’s seemingly easy ability to score to the Badgers’quickness and physical play.”[Wisconsin’s] quickness really made the difference at thestart of the game,” Bollant said. “They got by us off the dribble with thatfirst step, and we were just slow to recover, not only throughout the first fewpossessions, but throughout the game.”Seniors Jolene Anderson and Banks continue to lead theBadgers in scoring, notching 20 and 16 points, respectively. After a slow startscoring , Anderson turned her game into gear and picked up 12 second halfpoints.  “It says a lot aboutJo,” Stone said. “She sees the floor well, passes the ball well, she found themismatches inside, … my message to the team when we came out of the tunnelwas that we wanted to do some certain things, and Jolene made that happen.”Despite the Badgers’ poor free-throw shooting, Stone isexcited about the team’s effort and is happy to see her team improve.”I feel really good about the way we played against a goodteam,” Stone said. “Outside of the free-throw line, I think that was one of themost complete games we’ve played all season, and it’s a sign of good things tocome.””I am really proud of our team, this was a game we reallyneeded to play like this and hopefully we can forge forward from here.” As for achieving offensive goals, Anderson was relativelyhappy with the outcome of the game and how the team played too, but noted thatthe team’s energy level could be better.”It was okay,” Anderson said of the team’s energy level.”It’s something that we have to get better at, and it’s something that we haveto work on for the rest of this week. But it was better than it has been in thepast, but it’s not up to an A yet. … It’s still something that we need tofocus on.”last_img read more

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