14 Mowbray Road / Walker Bushe Architects

first_img Main Contractor: Manufacturers: 1st folding sliding doors, Apace Construction, Supply only kitchens Houses ArchDaily United Kingdom ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/794728/14-mowbray-road-walker-bushe-architects Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/794728/14-mowbray-road-walker-bushe-architects Clipboard Approved Inspector:Building Control Approval Ltd.Party Wall Surveyor:Barrett FirrellCity:LondonCountry:United KingdomMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Antonio ViscegliaText description provided by the architects. Acquisition of an adjoining site made possible a new extension to an existing Victorian period house in Brondesbury, North London, which had stabling at ground floor level originally. This enabled a doubling of the original volume and transformation into a stunning contemporary home for the two occupants. Save this picture!© Antonio ViscegliaThe building occupies a corner plot and acts a ‘bookend’ to the existing house and terraced street. The mono-pitched slate roof is separated from the existing brick house by a dark grey rendered panel which also demarks the new entrance to both parts of the newly combined buildings. A timber slatted screen to the front glazing provides extra privacy. The Welsh slate roof finish is taken down the side elevation creating a unified and discreet facade to the street. Save this picture!© Antonio ViscegliaThe new wing provides spacious open plan living/dining and kitchen on ground floor opening out through full height glazed sliding doors to a limestone paved terraced area at the rear. Wide board Oak flooring with underfloor heating throughout gives the clean interior a unified calm appearance. Save this picture!© Antonio ViscegliaThe dining area is located to take advantage of views to both the front and rear gardens. A study/gym and utility room within the boundary of the existing house complete the accommodation at ground floor level. A substantial roof-light over the stone clad island unit lights the kitchen from above. Save this picture!© Antonio ViscegliaThe living room features a real wood fire supported on a linear Limestone shelf which also conceals an LED wall-washer luminaire. Save this picture!© Antonio ViscegliaVertical hardwood slats form a dramatic screen to the main stair to first floor leading up to the first floor a master bedroom with an en-suite wet-room and dressing room which opens out on to the large elevated south facing terrace. Save this picture!© Antonio ViscegliaThe triangular shaped rear garden has at its apex a timber-clad workshop/studio with a green Sedum roof covering. Save this picture!© Antonio ViscegliaProject gallerySee allShow lessStudio Zhu-Pei’s Vaulted Museum Design Takes Inspiration from Historic Chinese Ceram…Architecture NewsBIG, MVRDV, Snøhetta, aMDL Unveil Proposals for San Pellegrino Bottling Plant Compet…Architecture News Share Apace Construction Area:  263 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project 2016 14 Mowbray Road / Walker Bushe ArchitectsSave this projectSave14 Mowbray Road / Walker Bushe Architects CopyHouses, Renovation•London, United Kingdom Architects: Walker Bushe Architects Area Area of this architecture project Photographs O’Connor Sokolowski (OCSP) “COPY” Structural Engineer: Save this picture!© Antonio Visceglia+ 19 Share Projects Year:  Photographs:  Antonio Visceglia Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project 14 Mowbray Road / Walker Bushe Architects “COPY” CopyAbout this officeWalker Bushe ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductBrick#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentRenovationLondonEnglandUnited KingdomPublished on September 19, 2016Cite: “14 Mowbray Road / Walker Bushe Architects” 19 Sep 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogShowershansgroheShower MixersEducational3MProjection Screen Whiteboard FilmPartitionsSkyfoldWhere to Increase Flexibility in SchoolsLinoleum / Vinyl / Epoxy / UrethaneTerrazzo & MarbleTerrazzo in The Gateway ArchSkylightsLAMILUXGlass Skylight FE PassivhausConcreteKrytonSmart ConcreteMetallicsTrimoMetal Panels for Roofs – Trimoterm SNVWire MeshGKD Metal FabricsMetal Fabric in Kansas City University BuildingGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Curved Glass PrintingMetallicsRHEINZINKZinc Roof Systems – Double Lock Standing SeamChairs / StoolsFreifrauBarstool – OnaSealants / ProtectorsWoodenha IndustriesFireproofing System for Wood Cladding – BIME®More products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?莫布里街14号 / Walker Bushe Architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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The Urban Village / TEAM_BLDG

first_imgCopyApartments, Renovation•Guangzhou, China ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/939215/the-village-team-bldg Clipboard The Urban Village / TEAM_BLDG China Photographs The Urban Village / TEAM_BLDGSave this projectSaveThe Urban Village / TEAM_BLDGSave this picture!Building façade after the renovation. Image © Jonathan Leijonhufvud+ 46Curated by 韩爽 – HAN Shuang Share “COPY” Architects: TEAM_BLDG Area Area of this architecture project Year:  Projects Area:  6000 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project 2019 Manufacturers: Magis, 伊莱克斯ElectroluxArchitect In Charge:Lei XiaoDesign Team:Lei Xiao, Shigeno Yuji, Yuqiong Yang, Zipeng Wang, Yi Cao, Pedro Manzano RuizClient:CHINA VANKE CO., LTD.City:GuangzhouCountry:ChinaMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!The only market in the urban village is just behind the building. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudRecommended ProductsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsFiber Cements / CementsRieder GroupFacade Panels – concrete skinWoodAccoyaAccoya® Cladding, Siding & FacadesText description provided by the architects. In his book Arrival City: The Final Migration and Our Next World, Doug Saunders points out that the development of the arrival city (also known as urban village) is an important part in the urbanization process. It may be the birthplace of the next wave of economic and cultural development, or the explosive place of the next wave of violent conflicts, which needs to be properly handled.Save this picture!Aerial view. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudGuangzhou is the only first-tier city where a large number of urban villages still exist in the city center. As of 2016, according to incomplete statistics, there are 304 villages in Guangzhou, with a total area of 716 square kilometers and a population of nearly 6 million. Just like the area where our renovation project is located, due to its superior location, a large number of migrants still flow in every year. However, most of the residential buildings they live in are dilapidated, facing the urgent need to be improved its living environment. A severe lack of funds and intricate surroundings are the biggest obstacles to the renovation of these old apartments. In this architectural renovation, we hope not only to solve a single problem, but also to explore a reproducible template to provide an additional solution for this old urban village area.Save this picture!Lighted apartment building at dusk. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudBustling urban village As the central urban area with the smallest area and the highest population density in downtown Guangzhou, Yuexiu district still has a lot of urban villages, remnant areas slightly disjointed with the high-speed urbanization. The renovation project this time is located in a well-known urban village at the Siyou Second Road in Yuexiu District.Save this picture!The new building and the old building. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudSave this picture!The rhythm of the facade can be seen from the sidewalk. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudThe residential buildings in the urban village are basically the matchbox type corridor houses built in the 1950s and 1960s. In order to meet the actual use needs, there are many additions and structures at the façade and inside of the building. With its excellent downtown location and convenient transportation environment, this area is populated by a large number of young office workers, with a very high population density. Therefore, it is faced with the urgent need to improve the quality of the community and the living environment.Save this picture!Most of the surrounding buildings are the matchbox type corridor houses. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudSave this picture!New building and old street. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudThe residential building to be renovated this time is located at a very special position, with a bustling urban trunk road in front and the Siyou meat and vegetable market, the only market in the urban village. The stores necessary for life, such as food, groceries and hardware, stand in the market. Nearby, there are two other residential buildings with very similar interior structure.   The unique texture of the bustling and noisy urban village was our first impression when we just arrived at the base.Save this picture!analysis diagramThe owner hopes that through the transformation of the facade, we can get rid of the old and dirty impression of the urban village and establish the benchmark image of the long-rented apartment brand. Meanwhile, it is hoped to improve the internal space, so that the apartment will not only meet the living comfort, but also make use of the public space to carry out activities and enhance neighborhood interaction.Save this picture!The only market in the urban village is just behind the building_before and after. Image © Jonathan Leijonhufvud“Lose weight” of new language of façadeAs the front connecting the city with the urban village, how the transformed facade increases the degree of integration to link with the city and maintain cohesion with the community is one of the key demands for the facade reconstruction.Save this picture!The rhythm of the facade can be seen from the sidewalk. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudSave this picture!”Light” façade material. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudWe studied and communicated about the punching method and proportion of the aluminum plate on the facade. After repeated proofing and confirmation, we chose the wavy punching aluminum plate to wrap the façade extending from the two ends of the atrium to the exterior. We strived to echo the punching pattern with the splicing mosaic of original building facade, to “reduce the weight” of the entire building through the semi-transparent covering layer and lighting setting, and meet the heavy traffic outside the house by the lightsome “rhythm” and jumping volume division.Save this picture!East facade. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudThe “dialogue” with the original buildings in the urban village behind also highlighted the contrast between the new and old languages, and the symbiosis with the surrounding buildings of big and small sizes emphasized the sense of “collage” of the texture level of the city facade.Save this picture!The buildings of different ages form a dialogue in style. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudCorridor “cuts” public and private secretsThe site is made full use in the interior of the building to make the staggered-floor corridor, and the east and west end of the corridor are connected with two staircases, which met the functional needs of small family settlement in the village at that time. However, there are a large number of structures in the inner courtyard surrounded by residents from the north and south and the air conditioning machines and wire chimneys that are scattered at random, which makes the only open public space in the original building unusually dirty and disorderly and there is even serious rat infestation in the courtyard.Save this picture!The public space surrounded by the main three-dimensional dynamic lines of the original building. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudTherefore, the main part of the internal reconstruction of the building should be the public space part in the yard and the rationale for re-dividing the house type is also the design point that we should focus on.Save this picture!The public space surrounded by the main three-dimensional dynamic lines of the original building_before and after. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudThe design starts with the central courtyard to clean the original structures in the yard and sort out the air conditioning and various lines and pipes to ensure the courtyard’s openness and comfort. According to local conditions, the public space surrounded by the main three-dimensional dynamic lines of the original building should be made full use of, to ensure that the lingering degree of the new residents in the central yard and staggered floor corridor by creating an interesting visual interior facade.Save this picture!The public space surrounded by the main three-dimensional dynamic lines of the original building. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudSave this picture!Rhythmic interior façade. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudSave this picture!Atrium-looking up. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudThe design should keep the original structure of the building as much as possible and retain the three spatial levels from the private to the public areas in the original buildings, namely the connection of different house types at each floor, the three-dimensional enclosure of the staggered floor corridor and the staircase in front of houses, and convergence at the central courtyard. The interlayer between the skirt buildings along the street and the residents is filled with the gym, audio-visual rooms and other public spaces and the top terrace is set with sightseeing, drying and other recreational areas. At the entrance, the sightseeing elevator is added to reach each floor conveniently.Save this picture!Guest room. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudSave this picture!Semi-transparent cover layer guarantees daylighting of the balcony_before and after. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudDifficulties and shortcomingsIn the process of renovation, due to not repairing for longer time and disorderly pipeline, the setting of the upper and lower water buried pipes and the new firefighting pipeline inside the building became the biggest problem in the renovation. However, how to connect the pipeline setting in the urban village with the existing municipal pipeline was also reasonably solved through multi-party efforts and consultations.Save this picture!The lighting effect of the facade. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudIn terms of materials, in order to meet the design requirements of high efficiency and low cost which is only 150 to 180 US dollars per square meter, we have chosen finished fabricated toilets and prefabricated building materials as much as possible, such as terrazzo floor tiles and dry hanging metal sheets.Regrettably, due to the limitation of time and budget, the materials and details for the entrance of the facade and the public space were handled in a hurry. The materials for the man approachable dimension should be more approachable, and the detail processing for the handrails should better meet the actual functional requirements.Save this picture!night view. Image © Jonathan LeijonhufvudProject gallerySee allShow lessUABB Yiantian Sub-Venue Installation and Exhibition / Rito RUA + Studio Paola ViganòSelected ProjectsThe Hovering Gardens House / Niraj Doshi Design ConsultancySelected ProjectsProject locationAddress:Siyou 2nd Rd, Yuexiu District, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, ChinaLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/939215/the-village-team-bldg Clipboard Photographs:  Jonathan Leijonhufvud Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project “COPY” ArchDaily Apartments CopyAbout this officeTEAM_BLDGOfficeFollowProductsGlassSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsRefurbishmentRenovationGuangzhouOn FacebookChinaPublished on May 13, 2020Cite: “The Urban Village / TEAM_BLDG” 13 May 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ NaturalPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Mirage®WindowsVitrocsaSliding Window – Mosquito NetSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Verge LVG-SeriesMetal PanelsTrimoQbiss One in Equinix Data CentreSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassMetal PanelsLongboard®Aluminum Battens – Link & Lock – 4″Sports ApplicationsPunto DesignPunto Fit in Ekaterinburg Public SpaceWoodBlumer LehmannFree Form Structures for Wood ProjectsKnobsKarcher DesignDoor Knob K390 (50)TablesVitsœ621 Side TableMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?村城,万科五羊泊寓PORT / 间筑设计是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Shelter choses Midland Software for personnel system

first_imgShelter choses Midland Software for personnel system About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 23 October 2002 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img  14 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The charity for homeless and badly housed people has selected Trent, Midland Software’s human resources system to service its personnel functions.Shelter, which has 850 employees based on 60 sites around the UK, has awarded a five-year contract to the Nottingham-based company. It selected the Trent core HR, payroll, recruitment and training modules.Midland Software was chosen after a competitive pitch involving Northgate and Shelter’s existing provider. Shelter hopes to benefit from improved integration between systems, thereby reducing double-keying and improving efficiency. Midland Software says that Trent will improve control of events through use of automated reminders and actions, and facilitate better, more accurate, management reporting. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Car Flips Over Onto Metro Train Tracks After Wednesday Collision on 210 Freeway, Snarls Traffic, Stops Gold Line Temporarily

first_imglatest #1 Car Flips Over Onto Metro Train Tracks After Wednesday Collision on 210 Freeway, Snarls Traffic, Stops Gold Line Temporarily Published on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 | 3:13 pm 5 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Business News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Make a comment Subscribe More Cool Stuff Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Herbeauty15 Beauty Secrets Only Indian Women KnowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Real Truth About The Pain Caused By MicrobladingHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Most Breathtaking Trends In Fashion HistoryHerbeautyHerbeauty A car heading westbound on the I-210 Freeway near Lake Avenue collided with a pickup truck before it flew over the K-rail siding of the freeway and landed upside down on the Gold Line tracks shortly before 11:23 a.m. this morning. The Gold Line was shut down, and traffic on I-210 Foothill Freeway was heavily impacted.The crash was reported to officials at 11:24 a.m., California Highway Patrol Officer Stephan Brandt said.Lisa Derderian, Public Information Spokesperson for the Pasadena Fire Department, said the driver suffered serious injuries.“We extricated a patient from the vehicle who was transported to a local hospital meeting trauma criteria,” she said. “We used one of our neighboring city’s search and rescue vehicles for the extrication.”The CHP has reported that the driver of the pickup pulled over on the freeway shoulder immediately following the accident, but his injuries, if any, are unknown.Derderian also said that there were significant traffic delays on the freeway in both directions. The California Highway Patrol issued a SigAlert for the westbound side of the freeway, with lane closures lasting until about 2 p.m.Buses replaced Gold Line trains between Allen and Del Mar as the wreckage was cleared. No trains were hit in the accident.Trains have resumed normal service with up to 15-minute residual delays thru 3:15 pm.center_img Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena First Heatwave Expected Next Week Top of the News last_img read more

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The Latest: Harris talks federal relief in weather emergency

first_img Pinterest Previous articleCockburn, Dosunmu lead No. 5 Illini past Northwestern 73-66Next articlePandemic politicking: Israel’s election sprint echoes US’s Digital AIM Web Support By Digital AIM Web Support – February 17, 2021 WhatsApp TAGS  Twitter Local NewsStateUS News The Latest: Harris talks federal relief in weather emergencycenter_img Facebook Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest Pierre Scott, a 59 year-old guest and volunteer at a warming center run by OurCalling, changed socks on his socially-distanced cot at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021. Scott like a lot of other folks, found refuge from the overnight sub-zero temperatures. Twitterlast_img read more

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Deputy McGinley and Senator O’Domhnaill strongly reject expenses claims

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Deputy McGinley and Senator O’Domhnaill strongly reject expenses claims Twitter Facebook Facebook Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Previous articleCarlton Drive community outraged at playpark pipe-bombNext articleConstruction of new power line to begin in autumn News Highland Both Deputy Dinny McGinley and Senator Brian O’Domhnaill has this evening stated in the strongest terms that neither have over claimed travel expenses to and from the Dail.Earlier today Senator Pearse Doherty called on both men to return any over payments if it were determined that they were received.It is reported today that a formal investigation into the expenses of a number of Donegal politicians is imminent on foot of a formal complaint due to be lodged to the Dail expenses watchdog.Senator Pearse Doherty’s comments today focused on Senator Brian O’Domhnaill and Deputy Dinny McGinley.Both claim expenses to and from Dublin via Sligo, each claim that they do so so as to attend constituency offices in Donegal Town and Ballybofey respectively.However Pearse Doherty, who travels via the north, questions if this is appropriate.Commenting this evening both Deputy McGinley and Senator O’Domhnail say they have checked with the appropriate authorities and that their expenses claims are appropriate and proper.Deputy McGinley added that no complaint has been lodged with the Dail expenses committee to date. WhatsAppcenter_img Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Newsx Adverts Google+ WhatsApp Pinterest 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North By News Highland – June 10, 2010 Pinterest Google+ Twitterlast_img read more

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On the Applicability Of The RTI Act To PM Cares And The Need For Accountability

first_imgColumnsOn the Applicability Of The RTI Act To PM Cares And The Need For Accountability Mohammad Zaid Zaman & Nitansha Nema30 May 2020 8:29 AMShare This – xPrelude to the Controversy Since its launch on March 28, 2020, the Prime Minister’s Citizen Assistance and Relief in Emergency Situations Fund “PM CARES” has courted as much controversy as it has funds. Having reportedly collected over INR 6500 crores within a week of its launch, the fund has incurred the wrath of the opposition (for the political-signalling acronym and for ignoring…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginPrelude to the Controversy Since its launch on March 28, 2020, the Prime Minister’s Citizen Assistance and Relief in Emergency Situations Fund “PM CARES” has courted as much controversy as it has funds. Having reportedly collected over INR 6500 crores within a week of its launch, the fund has incurred the wrath of the opposition (for the political-signalling acronym and for ignoring the existing PMNRF) and has also been the subject of at least two Public Interest Litigations “PILs”, neither of which got a warm reception at the Apex Court. While the first was dismissed summarily as being misconceived, the petitioners of the second were threatened with a fine and asked to withdraw the PIL owing to its “political colour”. Nonetheless, a dismissal of political objections still leaves pressing concerns of transparency and accountability as troubling residue. While the Apex Court’s order itself may be justified in view of the sound principle of ‘judicial deference to executive’, the swift and intolerant manner of its dismissal births a judicial chilling effect. Adding fuel to the fire, was the denial by the Prime Minister’s Office “PMO” to disclose information and documents pertaining to PM CARES against a Right to Information “RTI” application filed on April 21, 2020. This refusal has been condemned as being in sheer violation of the RTI Act as not only was it rooted in mere technicalities, but it also misinterpreted a SC decision in its reasoning. Further, in the first week of May, the Central Information Commission sent a letter to the Union Government directing them to maintain meticulous records of the public expenditure and welfare measures undertaken to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there was no specific reference to PM CARES. Latest in the slew of controversies is the PMO’s refusal on May 29, 2020, to furnish information sought by yet another RTI applicant regarding the constitution of PM CARES on the grounds that it is not a ‘public authority’ within the meaning of Section 2(h) of the RTI Act. This refusal coupled with factors such as its insistence on amassing staggering amounts of funds through non-budgetary heads of PSUs fortifies our concerns: PM CARES too, is attempting to shield itself from the sabre of the RTI Act, aping the stand taken by its so-called Siamese twin, PMNRF in the 2018 Delhi High Court case of PMNRF v. Aseem Takyar. Thus, here the authors argue in favour of the applicability of the RTI Act on PM CARES while also highlighting how a clear-cut accountability mechanism aligns with the guidelines of several international organizations and the approach adopted by other countries. PM CARES is “Public Authority” under RTI Act The primary question is whether PM CARES falls within the meaning of the term “public authority” defined in Section 2(h) of the RTI Act. The Division Bench in Aseem Takyar gave a split verdict on the quintessential question of whether or not PMNRF is a “public authority” within the meaning of Section 2(h). Section 2(h) is reproduced below: “(h) “public authority” means any authority or body or institution of self-government established or constituted- (d) by notification issued or order made by the appropriate Government, and includes any– (i) body owned, controlled or substantially financed; (ii) non-Government Organisation substantially financed, directly or indirectly by funds provided by the appropriate Government” Justice Sunil Gaur, holding the view that PMNRF is not a “public authority”, observed that it does not owe its genesis to the government, but to a Press Note issued by the then PM, Pandit Nehru, in his ex-officio capacity. Secondly, he relied on the SC decision in Thalappalam to establish the requirement of ‘substantial control’ as opposed to mere ‘supervisory control’ and on the Delhi HC decision in Army Welfare Housing Organization to demonstrate that the mere presence of government functionaries in an ex-officio capacity does not imply that the government is exercising control through said functionaries. Applying these, he opined that the fact that the fund is housed in the office of the PM, does not by itself support an inference that it is wholly owned by the government. Further, the fund is not constituted by the Parliament nor by the Government and it is managed by multiple delegates and not just government functionaries in their official capacity. In fact he goes on to say “If PMNRF is not non-governmental organization, then what is it?” Thirdly, on the aspect of funding, he emphasized on the voluntary nature of donations and the non-acceptance of contributions from budgetary sources of government or from the balance-sheets of PSUs. Lastly, he briefly sketched an in arguendo stating that the traditional custom of ‘Gupt Daan’ needs to be appreciated in light of the Puttaswamy judgment and the privacy of donors ought to be protected. PM CARES also owes its genesis to an appeal by the PM, Mr. Narendra Modi. Further, the power of the Chairperson to appoint three trustees may bolster the contention that management of the fund is the prerogative of a variety of delegates and not just government functionaries. Furthermore, the funds amassed from PSUs have been cornered carefully to superficially continue as a fund which accepts only ‘voluntary donations’. Despite these similarities, the authors respectfully disagree with Justice Gaur’s opinion and its applicability to PM CARES. To say the least, Justice Gaur’s analysis is superficial and goes against the object of the RTI Act. The enactment is a bastion of democracy and checks corruption by enhancing transparency and accountability. The preamble accentuates the need to harmonise the right to information with other pressing interests such as confidentiality and privacy in the broader context of “preserving the paramountcy of the democratic ideal.” Thus, we expatiate on how PM CARES constitutes a “public authority” by applying Justice Ravindra Bhat’s reasoning for PMNRF mutatis mutandis to PM CARES in addition to existing judicial precedents on RTI. The first question is whether PM CARES was constituted by a notification or order made by the appropriate Government. The fact that the fund was constituted on an appeal from the PM’s office via the Press Information Bureau supports the view of PM CARES as an authority or body established by ‘notification issued’ by the Government. If not, the Trust Deed by way of which PM CARES was birthed ought to suffice. If not, the instruments through which the decision to settle the trust was made and communicated to the Union Cabinet and the ordinance extending tax benefits or notifications granting exemption under FCRA or CSR incentives, ought to suffice as ‘notification issued or order made’ by the government. In any case, as per Justice Bhat’s interpretation, one must bear in mind the need to construe the provisions liberally and in light of the object of the RTI Act. The intention of the legislature to provide for an inclusive definition of “public authority” is indicated by the use of the words “and includes”. Thus, even if one were to assume that PM CARES was not established “by notification issued or order made by the appropriate Government”, subclauses (i) and (ii) of Section 2(h)(d) may be applied. Section 2(h)(d), unequivocally states that “public authority” “includes any body owned, controlled or (emphasis supplied) substantially financed directly or indirectly by the appropriate Government.” The PM is the Chairperson of the Board of Trustees and the Ministers of Defence, Home Affairs, and Finance are Trustees. All the aforesaid functionaries serve in their ex-officio capacity. Further, the PM, as the Chairperson, has the power to appoint three more Trustees (not yet appointed). The Trustees have the power to formulate the criteria for the disbursement of funds as well as appoint one or more independent auditor(s). The Trust Deed not being public as yet, there exists no clarification as to the decision-making process among Trustees inter-se. It is evident from the nature and extent of powers at the disposal of the PM and other cabinet ministers that it is indeed the Union Executive that exercises substantial control over the management and affairs of the Fund. Such a degree of control can by no stretch of imagination be termed as merely supervisory or regulatory. Arguing in the alternative, the authors proffer the tentative applicability of 2(h)(d)(ii) to PM CARES. The authors argue that if it isn’t imbued with governmental character and is indeed substantially private, it ought to be seen as a ‘non-government organization’ substantially financed by the government. It is pertinent to highlight the clear legislative intent in using the phrase ‘directly or indirectly’ which should help pierce through colourable attempts at circumvention. PM CARES, particularly, has amassed copious amounts from PSUs, MPLAD funds among others. The pressure to donate by accepting salary cuts (or other modes) is palpable. Caution has been exercised in not accepting funds from budgetary heads. For instance, Indian Railways, even with its fiscal struggles, has donated a whopping 151 crores-an amount generated through salary cuts. The argument is that the PM CARES Fund cannot be said to exist in the narrowest strip of executive convenience where they enjoy all benefits that accrue due to the governmental character without accepting any of the burdens and checks that the government is subject to. Simply put, the government cannot have its cake and eat it too. Non-applicability of Exemptions under Section 8 of RTI Act Further, the exemptions claimed by PMNRF in Aseem Takyar will not apply to PM CARES. The exemptions under Sections 8(1)(e) and 8(1)(j) of the RTI Act relate to protected interests of fiduciary relationship and privacy respectively, and are not absolute, but qualified by the goal of larger public interest being served by the disclosure of such information. The CBSE case, while examining Section 8(1)(e), elucidates fiduciary relationship as characterized by a person reposing complete confidence in another to act on his/her behalf- either in general or specific to a transaction. This is not the case with PM CARES as neither donors nor beneficiaries repose trust in PM CARES to conduct their affairs or to act on their behalf. The act of charity is insufficient for establishing a fiduciary relationship. Further 8(1)(j) carves an exemption for personal information, the disclosure of which bears no significance to any public activity or interest. The disclosure of information on how the PM CARES funds are being spent lies squarely in the “public interest” qualification. In Bihar Public Service Commission v. Saiyed Hussain Abbas Rizvi, the Supreme Court characterised “public interest” as incapable of a precise definition and flexible enough to “take colour from the statute in which it occurs.” In the present context, “public interest” draws its meaning from the democratic ideals of an informed citizenry and transparency of information for curbing corruption as enshrined in the preamble of the RTI Act. Furthermore, Justice KM Joseph’s verdict in the Rafale Review Case is apposite to further buttress the contention that the exemptions in Section 8(1) do not suffice as a justification to escape the duty to disclose information in the present case. He draws our attention towards Section 8(2) of the Act which overrides the Official Secrets Act and Section 8(1). It makes explicit the legislative intent in prescribing a harm versus benefit calculus. The harm to protected interests may be tolerated if public interest in disclosure outweighs said harm. In any case, Section 11 of the RTI Act allows third-parties apprehending an unwarranted breach of their privacy to make a representation to the concerned Public Information Officer “PIO”. Thus, the Act itself provides a recourse to aggrieved third-parties. Nevertheless, it preserves the democratic ideals of transparency and accountability, leaving the ultimate decision on disclosure to the PIO. This decision, once again, is guided by satisfaction of the aforementioned calculus of ‘public interest’. It is the authors’ vehement view that this harm versus benefit calculus tilts in favour of disclosure in this case. Donning the cynical lens for viewing government action is informed by antecedents of corruption and impropriety. While Senior Advocate Sanjay Hegde has pointed to the infamous cement scam, Yashwant Sinha has invoked a parallel with Electoral Bonds. The improprieties therein have stained the antecedents of the present government as well. Accountability and Expediency during Crises: International Theory and Practice The approach of bringing the PM CARES fund within the ambit of RTI is in harmony with the guidelines prescribed by the IMF, World Bank, and Transparency International for maintaining accountability standards during COVID-19 spending. These guidelines are unequivocal in their position: expediency is crucial, no doubt. Accountability, however, remains a sine qua non, rather, more so amidst crisis. The aphorism, “chaos is a ladder” is manifested in the corruption unearthed post the Hurricanes Katrina and Maria in the USA and the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. Senior officials from the World Bank have stressed on the reorientation of accountability mechanisms instead of their dilution. For instance, ex-ante controls may be replaced with “clear, explicit and credible” ex-post controls. Swift and succinct suo moto dissemination of information and ex-post check by the supreme audit institution (Comptroller and Auditor General “CAG” in India’s case) are other measures that further this view. The USA is looking to explore use of the Digital Accountability and Transparency “DATA” Act of 2014 – an Obama legacy – to make COVID-19 spending transparent by uploading details on USAspending.gov. Canada’s situation can be likened to India’s. While the Federal Information Commissioner has emphasized the need to document all COVID-19 decision-making, without a clear “duty to document”, the Access to Information regime is characterised by inertia. In the EU, the pandemic has dampened the Access to Information regime. Even so, the emphasis on whistle-blower protection in EU law disincentivizes misappropriation. Closer to home, even the Pakistan Supreme Court chided the government, directing it to put adequate transparency and accountability mechanisms in place for all COVID-19 funds. At home, the National Disaster Management Act, 2005 “NDMA”, which prescribes a CAG audit and penal measures for misappropriation of funds [Sections 53, 55, and 56], is a useful benchmark for accountability. The demand for a CAG audit, bolstered by a combined reading of Article 266(2) and Article 149 of the Constitution, is emboldened in light of the Government’s announcement to subject PM CARES to independent auditors. An independent auditor or even several auditors cannot be expected to “stand up to the might” of the Government. The model proposed by leading watchdogs in this respect is a dual audit including the CAG and an independent auditor. The hope is that both would act as a check on the other and minimize scope of abuse. Transparency and Trust – A classic give-to-get? In his speech on May 12, 2020, the PM made a poetic reference to the 2001 Gujarat earthquake. The striking fact is that, in 2002, the Gujarat High Court dealt with a PIL filed by several prominent public figures that demanded a proper mechanism for curbing misappropriation of the funds collected to provide effective relief to earthquake victims. It was made abundantly clear in the judgment that donations (whether in cash or kind) made to the Government, an NGO, or any other individual for the purpose of providing relief to the victims of a calamity are always in the nature of a trust. Since the donors have donated the funds for the specific purpose of relief, rehabilitation, and aiding the victims of such disasters, they have an enforceable right to demand accounts detailing the receipts and expenditures. Unfortunately, a CAG audit and emulation of accountability under the NDMA seem bleak possibilities now. However, assuming that the government is working with the best interests of the people in mind, it must acknowledge that its actions pose the threat of limiting the potential of PM CARES itself. The fund was set up not just to receive donations in tens of crores but to enable micro-donations as low as INR 10 itself. On May 13, 2020, the PMO announced allocations to the tune of INR 3100 crores for ventilators, migrant workers and vaccine development. This may be viewed as baby-steps in transparency. However, the authors vehemently insist that the dictate of transparency cannot hinge on whimsical benevolence of the Executive and must exist as a right. It has been nearly two months and the government’s glacial pace at making the fund transparent and accountable has all of us worried. With every day of silence on the issue, doubt festers causing a trust deficit. This trust deficit is counterproductive to realizing the full potential of the fund itself and thereby, to battling the pandemic. As such, the case for disclosure under RTI is already made. It would be best if the PM were to allay all such concerns by expressly declaring the fund to be subject to the RTI Act.Views Are Personal Only (The authors are final year law students at WBNUJS and RMLNLU and incoming associates at AZB & Partners and Lakshmikumaran & Sridharan respectively) Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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IBC Amendment Ordinance 2020 : Ambiguities Leave More Questions Than Answers

first_imgColumnsIBC Amendment Ordinance 2020 : Ambiguities Leave More Questions Than Answers G P Madaan & Aditya Madaan5 Jun 2020 11:21 PMShare This – xThe amendment gives rise to certain ambiguities as to the practical applicationIn view of the COVID-19 pandemic having impacted businesses, financial markets and the economy, thereby creating uncertainty and stress for businesses for reasons beyond their control, the President of India promulgated on 5th June, 2020 an Ordinance to further amend the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code,2016. The Ordinance, titled Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code (Amendment)…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginIn view of the COVID-19 pandemic having impacted businesses, financial markets and the economy, thereby creating uncertainty and stress for businesses for reasons beyond their control, the President of India promulgated on 5th June, 2020 an Ordinance to further amend the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code,2016. The Ordinance, titled Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code (Amendment) Ordinance, 2020, inserts Section 10A which selectively suspends the applicability Section 7, 9 and 10 of the Code to extend protection to corporate persons experiencing distress on account of the unprecedented situation, from being pushed into insolvency proceedings under the Code for some time. The Section 10A, along with its proviso and explanation reads as under :- “10A. Notwithstanding anything contained in sections 7,9 and 10, no application for initiation of corporate insolvency resolution process of a corporate debtor shall be filed, for any default arising on or after 25th March, 2020 for a period of six months or such further period, not exceeding one year from such date, as may be notified in this behalf: Provided that no application shall ever be filed for initiation of corporate insolvency resolution process of a corporate debtor for the said default occurring during the said period. Explanation – For the removal of doubts, it is hereby clarified that the provisions of this section shall not apply to any default committed under the said sections before 25th March 2020.” Salient features The salient features of the newly inserted Section 10A are as following :- No Application for ‘initiation of CIRP’ shall be filed for any default arising on or after 25th March 2020 for a period of 6 months or such further period not exceeding 1 year.No Application shall ever be filed for initiation of CIRP for defaults occurring during the said period.No suspension of Sections 7, 9 and 10 ‘before’ March 25, 2020. The purpose of the amendment appears not only to protect such corporate persons from the rigours of IBC, due to defaults occurring after 25th March 2020, but also to protect the object and scope of the Code inasmuch as the Ordinance takes into account the practical difficulty of finding resolution applicants to rescue such corporate persons who may default in discharge of their debt obligations. However, the insertion of Section 10A gives rise to certain ambiguities as to the practical application of the provisions as Section 10A specifically prohibits the “filing” of any Application to initiate the CIRP, whereas it would befall upon the Adjudicating Authority/NCLT (“AA”) to determine whether the occurrence of the default happened before or after 25th March 2020 and the onus of proving the same would lie upon the Corporate Debtor only when an Application in this regard is filed and comes up for adjudication before the AA. As filing of any application cannot practically be barred, in our view, the amendment should have prohibited admission of any such application which would have been filed for any default occurring during a specific period. Applicability – prospective or retrospective, and perpetual? An important question that arises from the ambiguity of Section 10A is that what date will be considered to be as the “date” from which the period of 6 months is to be counted from as the language of the provision reads “…. for any default arising on or after 25th March, 2020 for a period of six months or such further period, not exceeding one year from such date, as may be notified in this behalf”. It would be interesting to see how the AA or eventually the courts interpret the 6 month period, as the ambiguity and actions taken pursuant to would again inundate the AA with parties seeking or trying to prevent the use of the protection. Furthermore, the Ordinance by way of a proviso specifies that no Application shall “ever” be filed for initiation of CIRP against a corporate debtor for the said default occurring during the said period (6 months or extendable up to 1 year). However, the question that arises herein is whether, even after the expiry of the said period – if the default remains to be a continuing one – a creditor will be precluded from filing an application seeking initiation of CIRP regardless of the Corporate Debtor having recovered financially, for the reason that the default occurred after 25th March 2020, and whether such Corporate Debtor should continue to enjoy the Ordinance’s protection. The premise of the amendment is to provide relief from the stress arising because of the pandemic. But, the language rather creates a confusion as to when the six-month period (or further) would begin, i.e., from March 25 2020 or the date when the default occurs. Given that various benches of AA may interpret “such date” on a case to case basis, a uniform applicability is doubtful and would have to be addressed by the higher judiciary. The Ordinance also fails to provide any clarity as to the meaning and bifurcation of the amount of default in view of the earlier Notification by way of which the amount of default under Section 4 was increased from Rs. 1 Lakh to Rs. 1 Crore considering that a part of the default amount may have occurred before 25th March 2020 and a part of the default occurring after the said date. The question that arises herein is that if a majority amount of the default occurred before 25th March 2020 and the residual part of Rs. 1 Crore default occurs after 25th March or vice-versa, then would such a default be protected under the provisions of this Ordinance or shall be treated beyond the ambit of Section 10A thereby allowing such Creditor to file an Application for seeking to initiate CIRP against such Corporate Debtor. [Eg. Rs. 65 Lakhs default occurred in February 2020 and Rs. 35 Lakh default occurred on 01.04.2020] Another aspect that may give rise to a major question regarding the triggering of CIRP post the 6 month period (extendable upto 1 year) as specified in Section 10A is that in case a default occurs during the period specified therein and remains protected under the provisions of the ordinance, however, after the expiration of the specified period, the Corporate Debtor commits another default against the same creditor but that default alone does not meet the threshold under Section 4. Will the default occurring in the COVID period be coupled with the default occurring thereafter? Will such a creditor be able to file an application to initiate CIRP against such CD? It is also noteworthy that the effect of the present Ordinance would also extend to all such Companies who had given Corporate Guarantees before the earmarked date of 25th March 2020 but upon invocation after the said date, have failed to perform their obligations towards such Corporate Guarantees and therefore, would enjoy the protection of Section 10A in that regard. Resolution Plans The preamble to the Ordinance also acknowledges the likely difficulties in procuring adequate number of resolution applicants to rescue the corporate debtors. Nevertheless, existing resolution applicants have not been any less averse to the effects of the lockdown. It would be interesting to see how many resolution applicants approach AAs seeking a downward revision of their existing resolution plans which are already pending approval. More so, there may be applications by Resolution applicants in seeking relief in the implementation of approved plans which may now not be viable. Insertion of Sub-section (3) of Section 66 – Encouragement to Wilful Defaulters? The Ordinance also inserts sub-section (3) to Section 66 of the principal Act thereby prohibiting the Resolution Professional from filing an application under Section 66(2) of the Code. The provision of sub-section (3) under Section 66 reads as under :- “(3) Notwithstanding anything contained in this section, no application shall be filed by a resolution professional under sub-section (2), in respect of such default against which initiation of corporate insolvency resolution process is suspended as per section 10A.” The language of sub-section (3) to Section 66 implies that there will be a prohibition on the resolution professional to file an application under Section 66(2). Section 66 of the Code deals with Fraudulent trading or wrongful trading, i.e., transactions which were committed to defraud the creditors of the corporate debtors, and to identify and hold liable such persons who were responsible for such fraudulent transactions. Now, with the insertion of sub-section (3) to Section 66, does this give rise to a faulty provision providing undue protection to the Directors/Partners of a Corporate Debtor from being held liable even in future for any fraudulent transactions committed during the pandemic period? Does this imply that the Directors/Partners of a Corporate Debtor can engage in fraudulent transactions in the period of application of Section 10A causing defaults and yet enjoy the protection afforded to the Corporate Debtor under Section 10A; with the statutory protection extending even at a later stage, if such Corporate Debtor enters CIRP? The insertion of sub section (3) to Section 66 appears to run contrary to the purpose of Section 66 and seems to relegate a Resolution Professional from a custodian of the process to a mute bystander witnessing potential frauds. Or perhaps, a clarification is in order. Conclusion The Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code (Amendment) Ordinance, 2020 leaves more questions than answers, and embattled stakeholders may be compelled to walk on thin lines between protection, compliance and defaults. The article has been authored by Mr. G.P. Madaan, Managing Partner – Madaan Law Offices and Mr. Aditya Madaan, Advocate both practicing at Delhi High Court and NCLT, Delhi. Next Storylast_img read more

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Chatterjee Group, Rhône Capital jointly acquire Lummus Technology

first_imgLummus is a master licensor of proprietary gas processing, refining, petrochemical, and gasification technologie Chatterjee Group, Rhône Capital complete joint acquisition of Lummus Technology. (Credit: Adam Radosavljevic from Pixabay) Lummus Technology announced that Haldia Petrochemicals Limited, the flagship company of The Chatterjee Group (TCG), and investment funds affiliated with Rhône Capital have successfully completed the joint acquisition of Lummus from McDermott International. As previously announced, under the terms of the share and asset purchase agreement Chatterjee and Rhône committed to acquiring Lummus for a base purchase price of $2.725 billion from subsidiaries of McDermott as part of McDermott’s restructuring process.“This new and notable chapter starts with Lummus being a standalone company, as we will be the only major process technology licensor that is independent and privately held,” said Leon de Bruyn, President and Chief Executive Officer of Lummus Technology. “For our customers, employees and partners, this is a significant milestone. We will be able to focus exclusively on providing world class technologies and solutions and developing long-term strategies that will allow Lummus to lead and shape the future of our industry.”Lummus is a master licensor of proprietary gas processing, refining, petrochemical, and gasification technologies as well as a supplier of catalysts, equipment and related services. These technologies are critical in the refining of crude oil into gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and lubes; the manufacturing of petrochemicals and polymers; as well as the gasification of coal into syngas.Dr. Purnendu Chatterjee, Founder Chairman of TCG, added: “Our investments are both strategic and long-term, where most span across 25-30 years. We have primarily focused on knowledge-based companies, and Lummus is a great addition to our portfolio. Leading with innovation, Lummus delivers sustainable value to clients in the area of materials technology. We also see a significant synergy with our existing portfolio companies in the area of digitalization. We, being a long-term client of Lummus, can understand from the customers’ perspective and will now move towards co-creative innovation”M. Steven Langman, Co-Founder and Managing Director of Rhône, added, “Together with Chatterjee, we identified a unique opportunity to acquire an established, market leading business from McDermott. Rhône has deep experience partnering with management teams of multinational, industry leaders like Lummus and standing up and creating businesses positioned to grow and improve as independent companies. We look forward to working with the Lummus leadership team during its next phase as a standalone business as it initiates strategies to deliver its services and technology to a broader base of customers.”Under the terms of the purchase agreement, McDermott and Lummus have entered into a strategic agreement to form a mutually beneficial arrangement in which Lummus and McDermott will cooperate to contribute their respective strengths to offer value to mutual customers. Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

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Oakland City University Earns 2020-2021 Military Friendly® School Designation

first_imgOakland City University announces that it has earned the 2020-2021 Military Friendly® School designation.  This year will be the 11th year that OCU has earned this designation. Institutions earning the Military Friendly® School designation were evaluated using both public data sources and responses from a proprietary survey. More than 1,000 schools participated in the 2020-2021 survey with 695 earning the designation.The 2020-2021 Military Friendly® Schools list will be published in the May issue of G.I. Jobs magazine and can be found at www.militaryfriendly.com.“Oakland City University is proud of its tradition of serving student veterans.” stated Dr. Ron Dempsey, president of OCU. “One of our central values at the university is the support of God and Country and being designated as a Military Friendly® School is a tangible expression of that value.”Military Friendly’s National Director Josh Rosen stated, “Our ability to apply a clear, consistent standard to colleges creates a competitive atmosphere that encourages colleges to invest in programs to provide educational outcomes that are better for the Military Community as a whole.”Methodology, criteria, and weightings were determined by Viqtory with input from the Military Friendly® Advisory Council of independent leaders in the higher education and military recruitment community. Final ratings were determined by combining the institution’s survey scores with the assessment of the institution’s ability to meet thresholds for Student Retention, Graduation, Job Placement, Loan Repayment, Persistence (Degree Advancement or Transfer) and Loan Default rates for all students FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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