Dodgers place ace Kershaw on 10-day DL

first_imgMay 6, 2018 /Sports News – National Dodgers place ace Kershaw on 10-day DL FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailAllen Kee/ESPN Images(NEW YORK) — The Los Angeles Dodgers have not had the start to the season they were hoping for, and the team received more bad news Sunday.L.A. manager Dave Roberts announced the team is placing ace Clayton Kershaw on the ten-day disabled list with left biceps tendinitis.Kershaw felt discomfort while playing catch Saturday, but Roberts told reporters he’s “cautiously optimistic ” about the injury. The 30-year-old has not been his typical Cy Young self on the mound of late, giving up nine earned runs in 18 innings over his last three starts.Kershaw returned to Los Angeles to be examined by Dr. Neal ElAttrache, according to Roberts. Replacing Kershaw in the rotation will be veteran Rich Hill, who is coming off a stint on the DL himself for a cracked fingernail. He’ll start Tuesday against the Diamondbacks.It’s been an injury-plagued season for L.A., who already have shortstop Corey Seager and third baseman Justin Turner on the shelf. The team also lost another starter, lefty Hyun-Jin Ryu, until at least the All-Star break with a major groin injury.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Written bycenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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Coastal Storm to Salt Streets Ocean City-Style

first_imgThe National Weather Service issued a winter storm watch in effect for the region Wednesday night through Thursday afternoon, but Ocean City will have to worry more about the sea than the sky.A near-full-moon tide, northeast winds gusting up to 40 knots (46 mph) and heavy rain likely will combine to flood some streets — particularly during a high tide 7:04 a.m. Thursday (Feb. 13).Residents on flood-prone streets will want to consider moving their vehicles to higher ground during the nor’easter.The watch suggests inland areas could see as much as 4 to 12 inches of snow in a storm that will start as all snow but change over to a snow and sleet mix on Thursday morning, then all rain on Thursday afternoon. The changeover is predicted to start much earlier at the shore with only minimal accumulation of snow.Wet snow on power lines and heavy winds could lead to power outages in some areas. Thursday’s tidal flooding will be accompanied by sustained winds of 28 to 35 mph and seas 8 to 11 feet, according to the marine forecast. The full moon occurs on Friday (Feb. 14), and Thursday’s tide level is predicted to be higher than usual (3.88 feet). (See real-time tide levels at the Bayside Center on the 500 block of Bay Avenue in Ocean City.)The low temperature on Wednesday night will dip to 31 degrees, according to the National Weather Service forecast. But the high on Thursday will be well above freezing at 40 degrees. The sun is expected to return by Saturday.NBC40 meteorologist Dan Skeldon predicts the greatest snowfall northwest of the Interstate 95 corridor.“Along the shore, rain, wind, and tidal flooding impacts likely greater than any snow impact,” Skeldon said. “Any change in storm track can change the rain/snow line and these ideas. But you would need a pretty dramatic shift to bring heavy snows all the way to the shore. ”_____last_img read more

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Corda, Mildred (Millie) 81 of Ocean City

first_imgCorda, Mildred (Millie) 81 of Ocean City NJ and Bradenton, FL passed away on Saturday, November 19, 2016 surrounded by her loving husband of 62 years Raymond and her beloved daughter Maria Herron, son in law Doug and grandson Sean Herron. She is also survived by her loving son Raymond Jr., daughter in law Debra and granddaughter April Corda of Florida. She also leaves behind her grandchildren Samuel Corda, Lisa Wells (Jim), Joseph Corda (Kate), great grandson Joey Corda. Grandson Michael Hartman (Samantha) and great grandson Garrett Hartman. Her niece and nephew, Arlene and Ralph Preisano along with many other nieces and nephews.Her Memorial Service was held on Saturday, November 26 at 10:30 am at The Godfrey Funeral Home, 644 South Shore Road Palermo NJ.In lieu of flowers the family ask for donations in Millie’s name to Holy Redeemer Hospice and Homecare, 1801 N Route 9, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210. For condolences to the family please visit, www.godfreyfuneralhome.comlast_img read more

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A reading list on issues of race

first_imgThe wave of anger in reaction to George Floyd’s killing has prompted an outpouring of interest on race and race relations across the U.S. Books on these subjects top The New York Times Best Sellers list and Barnes & Noble’s Bestsellers. Amazon’s best-selling book, “White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism,” by Robin DiAngelo, has sold out.The Gazette asked Harvard faculty members to discuss the books they recommend for those who want to learn more about the issues and to expand their understanding of systemic racism, white privilege, and the long legacies of slavery and white supremacy in American history.“The Souls of Black Folk” (1903)by W.E.B. Du Bois,No one did more to write the African American people into the textual universe of speaking subjects, as agents, than did William Edward Burghardt Du Bois in his canonical work of American literature. “The Souls of Black Folk,” the masterpiece in Du Bois’s considerable oeuvre, has deserved every bit of critical acclaim and explication it has received since its publication in 1903. Du Bois’ signal achievement was to employ two tropes that encapsulated both the history of a people freed from centuries of human bondage, finally, just 38 years before he published his book, railing at the beginning of a new century against the most diabolical attempts to deconstruct the transformations wrought by the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments and entrap African Americans once again as quasi-citizens stuck forever in the limbo of forms of neo-enslavement.One was “The Veil,” behind which the social and spiritual life of a people-within-a-people unfolded in the fullest range of complexity of every other branch of human civilization. Another was “double consciousness,” a metaphor with a long history tracing back at least to Emerson, if not beyond, to which Du Bois most probably was introduced by his mentor, William James. Du Bois’s signifying riff on the concept was to insert a “hyphen” as, itself, the liminal space that simultaneously separated yet connected the African American’s dual identity, as “an American” and “as a Negro,” as he put it, “two warring ideals in one dark body.” And third, Du Bois was the first scholar, I believe, to posit as an equal member of the canon of the artifacts of classical world civilization a specific corpus of the African American sacred vernacular form, forged from within the crucible of slavery by the enslaved, composed by “black and unknown bards,” as the poet James Weldon Johnson so aptly put it, in a poetic diction that itself was an astonishingly compelling example of an Africanized refashioning of King James English. Ever the prose-poet himself, Du Bois, Black America’s Victorian sage, dubbed these “The Sorrow Songs,” America’s only truly original and genuinely sublime contributions, he boasted, to the greatest monuments of genius in the long history of civilization.Du Bois, in other words, gave not only a rhetorical structure to the historical and dynamically unfolding multiple identity of this black nation within a nation, he found metaphors to name key aspects of their liminal cultural and social being. Above all else, he named, with seminal tropes of his own fashioning, the conflicting identities of being black and being American, tropes that would resonate down through the canonical texts in the African American tradition, from James Weldon Johnson’s “The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man” and Jean Toomer’s “Cane,” through Ralph Ellison’s monumental novel “Invisible Man,” at mid-century, all the way to Toni Morrison’s “Beloved” and “Jazz,” two achievements alone justifying her receipt of the Nobel Prize in literature. Though the subject matter of “Souls” is rooted squarely in a fin-de-siecle discourse of the turn of the 20th century, Du Bois’ analysis, his metaphors, have traveled supremely well across time and through space, remaining desperately relevant today, especially today, as black people continue to confront a systemic, structural racism — a mutation inscribed between the spaces of our Republic’s Founding Documents — that affects them in ways even our most sympathetic allies across the color line can scarcely comprehend without considerable effort. Race relations in our wonderful country would measurably improve if all students were required to read this book.— Henry Louis Gates Jr.Alphonse Fletcher University Professor, Director, Hutchins Center for African & African American Research“The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America” (2019)by Khalil Gibran Muhammad,Many books are relevant, but two are indispensable for understanding the broken relationship between police forces and urban communities, and public outrage over the killing of George Floyd and other African Americans. Khalil Gibran Muhammad’s “The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America” describes the creation following slavery of a racist ideology that framed African Americans as dangerous and likely criminals; that mindset animated laws, policies, and aggressive police practices that dehumanize, criminalize, incarcerate, and sometimes lead to the killing of disproportionate numbers of African Americans.“From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America” (2016) by Elizabeth HintonElizabeth Hinton’s “From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime” explains the policy shift soon after passage of landmark Civil Rights legislation during the 1960s from social welfare to criminal justice as a framework for understanding enduring racial inequities, poverty, and unrest. That shift led to the militarization of police departments and the over-policing of urban communities — especially those filled with young, black men — and the destructive, and sometimes fatal, consequences that we see today. Each book provides vital context for understanding the police killings and the protests against them.— Tomiko Brown-NaginDean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced StudyDaniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law SchoolProfessor of History, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University“The Origin of Others” (2017)by Toni Morrison,On May 30, I finally sat down to Toni Morrison’s “The Origin of Others.” This beautiful little book draws on her Norton Lectures — lectures given at Harvard back in 2016. Why did I pick up the book, that recent day? I think I was trying to make sense of the Central Park Cooper story and the George Floyd story.“What motivates the human tendency to construct Others? … Why does the presence of Others make us so afraid?” These are some of the questions the great Morrison reflected on in her lectures. In her signature ornate and deeply lyrical manner, she examines the persistence of racism, bigotry, and intolerance in a world where we still have to demonstrate that … black lives matter.Somehow, I had never heard of the story of Isaac Woodard, a black veteran in uniform (he had served four years in the Pacific Theater — had been promoted to sergeant, had earned a Campaign Medal, a WWII Victory Medal, and the Good Conduct Medal) who’d been beaten, thrown in jail, and had his eyes gouged out. The police chief responsible for most of this violence, Linwood Shull, was acquitted of by an all-white jury. There were no iPhones documenting the abuses. But, in her lectures (in the beautiful little book) she brought this story to my attention. As we reflect on Christian Cooper’s “near miss,” George Floyd’s final eight minutes on this earth, and the many violent deaths of black men, women, and children since 1619, let us also take a harder, deeper look into ourselves, let’s ask the tough questions put forth by Toni Morrison.“White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide” (2016) by Carol AndersonThere is another book that I think we all need to read and read again: Carol Anderson’s “White Rage.” It so plainly shows us that whenever African Americans started to make any strides (in education, voting, employment, home ownership), those gains were a threat to the status quo of inequality — those strides sparked incredibly intense and well-organized blowback — all of which leads me to appreciate just how insidious and persistent racial hatred is in the U.S. We have to get smarter, bystanders … we need your help, it is not enough to proclaim that you’re not racist, we need your help.— Michelle WilliamsDean of the Faculty, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthAngelopoulos Professor in Public Health and International Development, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Kennedy School“Progressive Dystopia: Abolition, Antiblackness, and Schooling in San Francisco” (2019)by Savannah Shange,Right now, I’m reading a book that I appreciate so much. Shange’s “Progressive Dystopia” is a great ethnographic study that brings together anti-blackness and critical race and ethnic studies theories. It explores race, abolition, criminalization, and policing in the context of education. The role of race scholars, or any scholar, is to point out that what might appear to be a photograph is really the tip of an iceberg, that there are actually deep-seated structural practices, contexts, histories that might not be visible to some, but that are still present in that moment.“Progressive Dystopia” speaks to our time in a way that is so useful because it points to the body of the iceberg. Shange is not only an amazing storyteller, her work forces us to think about the carceral state beyond just prisons to show that also happens in school systems with black youth. It’s not just when black bodies walk down the street that these carceral exchanges happen; they also happen in something as mundane and everyday as our schools. This is not about just Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, or Tony McDade, but it’s about the carceral and policing that black people weather in many other institutional experiences before we even step out of our houses and walk down the pavement. It’s an accumulated set of experiences of being policed and criminalized because you’re black.The book also discusses the abolition of the carceral state across our institutions, and how abolition can be a practice and a worldview espoused by some of the most dynamic activists of this time, including black teenagers who have an abolitionist ethos. Black youth are not just the objects of anti-black carcerality. They are dynamically well-suited to craft ideas that don’t just respond to liberal ideas of educational reform, but reimagine what education and our society can be. Abolition emerges as a generative and not just a deconstructive project. I deeply appreciate that Shange allows us as readers to be taught by them.This revolution we’re seeing right now is being taken up all over the country, by black people, people of color comrades, white allies, anti-racists, and new dissidents who are protesting a certain kind of ethics. People are refuting police murders as well as other forms of state abandonment and disposals. “Progressive Dystopia,” which does an amazing job of showing how the carceral state that is so integrated into so many aspects of black life, helps us to better understand the substance of rage on display this moment. When people say they’re fed up, a single event can light a fuse, but the substance of the explosive, if you will, are these accumulated experiences of carcerality and what Wendy Brown calls sacrificial citizenship — experiences that have extended their reach into the lived social realities of African Americans and more and more groups in American society writ large.— Todne ThomasAssistant Professor of African American Religions, Harvard Divinity SchoolSuzanne Young Murray Assistant Professor, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study“Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right” (2016)by Arlie Hochschild,A genuine effort to understand the viewpoints of decent, sane, often thoughtful supporters of the Tea Party and Trump — the people I don’t know very well outside of newspaper stories. Many students in my “Race in a Polarized America” course this spring voted it the best reading of the semester.“Hearing the Other Side: Deliberative versus Participatory Democracy” (2006) by Diana MutzMutz’s “Hearing the Other Side” is a careful political science analysis of a basic political conundrum: We seem to be able to have either deeply committed political or social activists, or thoughtful, deliberative discussions among people who disagree with each other — but not both. How can a democracy thrive in that sort of situation, and how might we alleviate it (if we should)?— Jennifer HochschildHenry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government at Harvard UniversityProfessor of African and African American StudiesHarvard College ProfessorCity of Inmates: Conquest, Rebellion, and the Rise of Human Caging in Los Angeles, 1771‒1965” (2017)by Kelly Lytle Hernández,In her trenchant and arresting book, “City of Inmates,” UCLA historian Kelly Lytle Hernández reveals the roots of mass incarceration in Los Angeles, the largest urban site of human confinement in the nation. By tracing practices of policing and jailing across discrete historical moments narrated as six stories, she demonstrates that Ronald Reagan’s War on Crime in the 1980s greatly expanded — but did not create — the phenomenon of racially targeted incarceration. Noting that African Americans and Native Americans today face the highest rates of death at the hands of police and the highest rates of confinement across the nation, Hernández digs to uncover why. She relies on what she calls a “rebel archive” comprised of songs, coded letters, political notices, maps, and more created by those who challenged forced labor, violent policing, and the targeting of marginalized groups.Hernández begins her study in the colonial period, revealing how Spanish elites founded the city of Los Angeles in 1781 and immediately built a jail in the indigenous territory of the Tongva-Gabrielino tribe. Those who would fill the jail were not Spanish newcomers or their descendants, but rather indigenous people whose everyday actions (such as mobility on the landscape) were increasingly criminalized. In America in the 19th century, Hernández reveals that city officials targeted nonconformist white men defined as “vagrants” and “hobos” for intense policing and jailing, forcing them into a convict labor system that built the city’s early infrastructure. Hernández then covers the rising confinement of Mexican Americans after the U.S. war with Mexico and the definition of immigration as a crime to be managed by detention. She pursues her question through the 1960s, showing that as greater numbers of African Americans migrated westward in the 20th century, they became the next targets of aggressive policing. Following the killing of an unarmed young black man by LAPD officers in 1927, the black community in LA began a long tradition of protesting police brutality. The failure of the city to change its policing practices boiled over into the Watts Rebellion of 1965.Hernández asserts that a powerful yet unexpected through line connects these varied stories of policing and incarceration across the sweep of nearly two centuries: the need for a dominant settler colonial population to “eliminate” or, alternatively, to control indigenous, racialized, and unorthodox groups in order to secure land as well as access to cheap labor. With a micro focus on one of the country’s most racially diverse and highly carceral cities, Hernández argues that American policing and jailing stem from an agenda of territorial conquest and the sequestering and exploitation of groups relegated to the margins of society.— Tiya MilesProfessor of History, Harvard UniversityRadcliffe Alumnae Professor, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study“Race, Reform, and Rebellion: The Second Reconstruction and Beyond in Black America, 1945‒2006,” (Third Edition 2007)by Manning Marable,Beginning with the legacy of post-Civil War Reconstruction amendments, Marable offers an inspiring, sweeping, and detailed history of African American social protest movements. He is ever mindful of ideological diversity among black Americans even as he highlights the strong bonds of solidarity that have sustained us. He draws lessons from the successes and failures of these movements, lessons that, I believe, could be useful in this moment of reckoning and insurgency. As he says in the preface, “Any oppressed people who abandon the knowledge of their own protest history, or who fail to analyze its lessons, will only perpetuate their domination by others.” These lessons concern not only political strategy and tactics but also fundamental moral ideals and the ethics of resistance. The book is a work of social and political theory rooted in deep historical analysis, and offers a powerful vision of a multiracial democracy. Ultimately, Marable calls for, and hopes for, a “third reconstruction” to bring about genuine political empowerment and economic justice for black Americans.— Tommie ShelbyCaldwell Titcomb Professor of African and African American Studies and of Philosophy, Harvard University“Racism: A Short History” (2015, original ed. 2002)by George Fredrickson,Unfortunately, there is nothing exceptional about the brutal execution of George Floyd. In the Americas, I have been saying repeatedly in the last few days, the country where the largest number of people of African descent die at the hands of the police is not the U.S.: It is Brazil. What informs these episodes of racialized violence, the criminalization of people of African descent, across national boundaries? How do we make sense of the enduring power of white supremacist ideologies and practices? Why do we classify people to begin with? Those trying to understand how certain bodies of Western knowledge sustain these practices, how they anchor contemporary understandings of human difference according to race, will find initial answers in this volume.— Alejandro de la FuenteRobert Woods Bliss Professor of Latin American History and Economics, Professor of African and African American Studies and of History, Harvard UniversityDirector, Afro-Latin American Research Institute, Hutchins Center for African and African American Research“When Police Kill” (2017)by Franklin E. Zimring,Zimring’s “When Police Kill” is a groundbreaking, fact-based analysis, including trends over time, of the high use of deadly force by police in the U.S., including lethal force against African Americans and Native Americans. Zimring’s comprehensive study also includes an interesting comparative analysis of why police killings are so much more numerous in the U.S. than in other modern nations. Finally, he discusses how to address this problem systematically by detailing clear policy prescriptions for federal, state, and local governments.— William Julius WilsonLewis P. and Linda L. Geyser University Professor EmeritusDepartment of Sociology, Harvard University“Policing the Black Man: Arrest, Prosecution and Imprisonment” (2018)by Angela Davis,“Policing the Black Man” is an excellent resource because it addresses from a variety of perspectives — historical, sociological, legalistic — a gamut of issues that are currently at the forefront of public attention. It addresses, for instance, why is blackness is so closely associated with criminality in the American mind? Why has identifying, much less uprooting, invidious racial discrimination by police, prosecutors, jurors, and judges proven to be so difficult? Hauntingly, in light of the impending trials of police associated with the killing of George Floyd, “Policing the Black Man” offers sobering instruction regarding ongoing challenges in bringing to account even flagrant, violent, illicit abuse by law enforcement officers.— Randall KennedyMichael R. Klein Professor of Law, Harvard Law School The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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Governor Douglas to lead NGA in discussing health care, economy

first_imgGovernor Jim Douglas, chairman of the National Governors Association (NGA), will lead the nation’s governors at their annual winter meeting in Washington this weekend.  At the meeting, governors will address critical issues, including health care reform and the economy.  They will also meet with President Obama, members of his Administration, business leaders and other experts for discussions on a host of issues and challenges facing states.“It is a great honor and responsibility to chair the National Governors Association,” said Governor Douglas.  “This is a critical time as our nation and the states are facing enormous fiscal and economic challenges.  This weekend is an opportunity for governors to meet with one another, the President and his Administration and others from the public and private sector to discuss ways to get our economy back on track, create jobs and address pressing challenges, like health care.”Governor Douglas has focused his chairmanship of the NGA on health care and Saturday’s opening plenary session will offer an overview of his initiative, Rx for Health Reform: Affordable, Accessible, Accountable.  During the session, governors will discuss transforming health care delivery with guests Dr. Atul Gawande, a surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and associate professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, and Dr. Jack Cochran, executive director of The Permanente Federation. On Sunday, the focus of the plenary session will be health care and the economy, with financial journalist Maria Bartiromo, anchor of CNBC’s “Closing Bell,” moderating the discussion.“While the path forward for health reform in Washington is unclear, reform is happening in the state,” the Governor remarked.  “I am proud of the steps we have taken in Vermont.  My chairman’s initiative focuses on helping governors lead the way in improving the quality of our system, providing more insurance coverage and addressing key cost drivers to ensure we have a system that is affordable, accessible and accountable.”As NGA chairman, Governor Douglas has invited Canadian Premiers for a special session on Saturday, “Common Border, Common Ground,” which will focus on common challenges, innovative policy solutions and issues related to trade, border security, energy and the environment.  “Having the Premiers and the Governors meet is a tremendous opportunity to advance our shared interests,” the Governor remarked.  The governors will spend time with Adjutants General from across the country as well.Governor Douglas and his colleagues will also have the opportunity to meet with President Obama.  On Sunday they will attend the White House for a black-tie evening with President and Mrs. Obama.  The following day, the governors will return to the White House for meetings with the President and members of his Cabinet to discuss the issues being debated in Washington and how they will affect the states.“I appreciate President Obama reaching out to the nation’s governors and listening to our concerns,” said the Governor.  “It will take all of us working together at the federal, state and local levels to rebound from this recession.”The meeting will conclude Monday afternoon with a plenary session focused on redesigning states in the post-recession economy.  Mark Zandi, chief economist and co-founder of Moody’sEconomy.com, and Alan Mulally, president and CEO of Ford Motor Company, will join governors to examine the economic landscape facing the country and states over the next several years.Source: Washington, D.C. – Governor’s office. 2.19.2010 ###SATELLITE COORDINATES – C-BAND ANALOG Saturday, February 20, 20104:00 – 4:30 Easter Time (1600 – 1630)Galaxy 19 CBAND @ 97 Degrees WestTransponder C – 8 AnalogUL Frequency 6085 VerticalDL Frequency 3860 Horizontal (Audio 6.2 & 6.8)Sunday, February 21, 20104:00 – 4:30 Easter Time (1600 – 1630)Galaxy 19 CBAND @ 97 Degrees WestTransponder C – 8 AnalogUL Frequency 6085 VerticalDL Frequency 3860 Horizontal (Audio 6.2 & 6.8)Monday, February 22, 20103:30 – 4:00 Easter Time (1530 – 1600)Galaxy 19 CBAND @ 97 Degrees WestTransponder C – 8 AnalogUL Frequency 6085 VerticalDL Frequency 3860 Horizontal (Audio 6.2 & 6.8)last_img read more

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Barcelona prepare £100m Marcus Rashford bid while Manchester United are in chaos

first_imgRashford is a wanted man (Picture: Getty Images)Barcelona are ready to capitalise on Manchester United’s chaotic contractual negotiations by tabling a £100million bid for Marcus Rashford, reports claim.The Catalan giants hold a long-term interest in signing the attacker, whose current deal expires in 2020, and are ready to test the waters with a huge bid.Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is preparing to tear up his Manchester United squad and start again but he faces a series of challenges from key players whose contracts are drawing to an end. Advertisement Comment Barcelona prepare £100m Marcus Rashford bid while Manchester United are in chaos Solskjaer post-City: Towards end you can see difference in classTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 7:40FullscreenSolskjaer post-City: Towards end you can see difference in classhttps://metro.co.uk/video/solskjaer-post-city-end-difference-class-1912310/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Barcelona believe Rashford – a boyhood United fan – could see his head turned if United fail to qualify for the Champions League next season and will lay a huge fee on the table in an attempt to lure him to the Camp Nou, according to The Sun.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTIt could be an active summer at Old Trafford, with Paul Pogba reportedly keen on a move to Real Madrid, Eric Bailly wanted by Arsenal and David de Gea actively considering a move to Paris Saint-Germain, while Romelu Lukaku admitted he would be keen on a transfer to Italy in the not too distant future.Should Manchester United sell Rashford?Yes0%No0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your results Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterFriday 26 Apr 2019 7:17 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link695Shareslast_img read more

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PFA, PensionDanmark lift H1 returns with all asset classes positive

first_imgIn the first half of this year, the bond portfolio produced around 5% in return, PFA said.“This was particularly due to the foreign bonds, which represent a total value of well over DKK100 billion in the portfolio,” it said.Overall, assets dipped to DKK411.2bn at the end of June from DKK417.5bn at the end of December.PFA said the gains in foreign bonds were mainly due to its exposure to emerging markets and underlying, strong-performing portfolios, which yielded almost 7% during the first six months of 2014. On top of this, the falling level of interest rates during the first half had led to positive returns on bonds and interest rate hedging, it said.Equities returned around 9.5%, it said, mainly due to the focus on Danish shares, which increased by more than 20% in the period.Alternative investments had grown by more than 10% in the first half, it said, adding that it was increasingly investing in non-listed companies now.Property generated around 4.3%, it said.The pension provider’s investment returns translated into a return of between 5.5% and 7.5% for customers with unit link pensions, compared to an average rate of 2.3% in the same period last year, according to the interim report.Customers with traditional with-profits pensions would get an 8.0% return compared with a 2.2% loss in the first half of 2013.Meanwhile, labour-market pension fund PensionDanmark posted a first half return of DKK9.9bn —higher than the entire 2013 return of DKK9.1bn, and beating the DKK2.2bn return generated in the first six months of last year.The 2014 first half investment return led to scheme member returns of between 6.5% and 6.6%, the pension fund said, adding that these returns had increased since the end of June to 8.3% and 8.4%.Torben Möger Pedersen, chief executive of PensionDanmark, said: “This is a satisfactory result, which reflects the fact that there have been positive returns on all asset classes.”He said it was unusual in markets to have rising equities prices and falling interest rates at the same time.“We are trying to put together a balanced portfolio that can do well both when the sun shines and when it rains,” he said.Contributions had increased in the January-to-June period to DKK6.8bn from DKK5.2bn, PensionDanmark said, boosted mostly by DKK1.8bn of transfers from other pension funds due to job changes.Total assets increased to DKK165bn at the end of June from DKK152bn at the end of December. Denmark’s PFA reported an investment return of DKK24.7bn (€3.3bn) for the first half of the year, bouncing back from the DKK4.9bn loss it booked in the same period a year ago, with results boosted by a high proportion of foreign bonds.The results came as PensionDanmark also published half-year results that saw investment income for the first six months outstrip income from all of 2013.PFA, the commercial mutual pensions provider said: “This year, PFA obtained its historic high return based on its successful interpretation of the markets on several fronts.”The provider has explained the loss recorded in the first half of 2013 by saying it had not recognised the operational risk charge due to the increase in interest rates during the reporting period.last_img read more

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NKT Victoria Starts Johan Sverdrup Power Cable Installation

first_imgStatoil has informed that the laying of the cable supplying Johan Sverdrup with power from shore has started.On Wednesday the cable laying vessel NKT Victoria began laying the cables that will supply the Johan Sverdrup field with power from shore.The starting point was the Johan Sverdrup converter station at Haugsneset near Kårstø, and by the end of May the vessel will have laid nearly 200 kilometers of power cables out to the field in the North Sea, the company said.“We are now laying the very lifeline of the Johan Sverdrup field, which will supply the field with power from shore for more than 50 years,” said Trond Bokn, senior vice president for Johan Sverdrup.The power cables will help make Johan Sverdrup one of the most carbon-efficient oil and gas fields in the world.Estimated at just 0.5 kg of CO2 per barrel, the emissions from Johan Sverdrup are about 20 times lower than the average on the Norwegian continental shelf, and 30 times lower than the international average.“The world is facing considerable challenges ensuring access to enough energy while doing so in a more climate-friendly way. Here Johan Sverdrup will play an important role: over the next 50 years, the field’s considerable reserves will be used to produce significant amounts of energy with low CO2 emissions,” Bokn said.The CO2 emissions avoided as a result of Johan Sverdrup using power from shore add up to more than 400,000 tonnes of C02 per year, equivalent to the emissions of some 200,000 cars each year.Several additional measures have been implemented to further reduce emissions during the Johan Sverdrup development. The cable-laying vessel NKT Victoria was designed to be supplied with power from shore while in harbour.The mobile accommodation vessel ‘Haven’, in use at the field from June onwards, has also been modified to utilize power from shore while in service at the Johan Sverdrup field.“We’ve worked systematically to take advantage of the opportunities which the power from shore solution has given us. As a result, I believe we’ve been able to reduce the carbon emissions from the field to the minimum,” said Geir Bjaanes, responsible for subsea, power and pipelines for the Johan Sverdrup project.“Before we get to that stage, however, we need to stay focused on the hectic installation period ahead of us. For the next three weeks or so we will be laying almost 10 kilometres of cables every single day. We have spent much time together with NKT preparing for this, but this will put our skills to the real test, our number one priority being safety and ensuring high quality in execution,” added Bjaanes.After the cables reach the Johan Sverdrup field at the end of May, the next step will be to pull the cables in to the riser platform, where the converter station for the first phase of the development is located.Then the cables will be connected, before preparations and testing of the system start. And in the autumn of 2018, the Johan Sverdrup field should be ready to be powered with electricity from shore.After the start-up of the second phase of the development in 2022, the Johan Sverdrup field will also enable power from shore to reach the remaining fields on the Utsira High – Edvard Grieg, Gina Krog and Ivar Aasen.last_img read more

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Bulldogs Battle Trojans On The Mat

first_imgThe BMS Wrestling team fell to Sunman Dearborn by a score of 80-27 on Thursday night.The Bulldogs were crippled by forfeits giving up 48 points to the Trojans through eight unfilled weight classes. Things started off slow through the lower weight classes and the Dogs did not get their first victory until Elijah Stover pinned his opponent at the 140 pound weight class. Josh Mobley followed at the 145 pound weight class with a decision win. Aaron Norman contributed a third straight win with a forfeit at 155 pounds. The win streak was broken up by a forfeit at 165 pounds, but then Chase Hamilton and Jesus Garcia both picked right back up where things left off with back to back pins at 180 and 195 pounds.The Bulldogs added three more winners in JV competition. Bobby Weiler defeated his opponent 6-2 in a decision victory. Hunter Laudick battled it out in a 10-7 decision, and Jesus Garcia pinned his opponent for the second time in as many matches.The team will head to South Dearborn on Saturday for an Invitational before heading back to BMS for two straight home meets next week.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Bob Weiler Jr.last_img read more

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Impossible to delay Olympics again, says Tokyo chief

first_img He said holding the Games would require not only Japan but also the rest of the world to have the virus under control. Impossible to delay Olympics again, says Tokyo chief Read Also: UEFA endorse Spanish FA proposal for European spots The organising committee itself has been hit the virus, saying Wednesday that a staff member in his 30s working at its Tokyo headquarters had tested positive for the disease. Postponing the Games is a massive logistical undertaking, and expected to incur significant additional costs. Kyodo News quoted Mori as saying the opening and closing ceremonies would need to undergo “drastic reviews” in order to cut costs, adding that organisers would ask the ceremonies’ directors to consider including a message about the coronavirus crisis. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted Content6 Extreme Facts About HurricanesBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldWhat Is A Black Hole In Simple Terms?Top 10 Iconic Personalities On TV Now7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A Vegetarian7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market Value6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes10 Characters That Should Be Official Disney Princesses6 Of The Best 90s Shows That Need To Come Back ASAP8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?The Best Cars Of All Time The Tokyo 2020 Olympics cannot be delayed beyond the year-long postponement already forced by the coronavirus outbreak, the organising committee’s president has warned in comments published Thursday.Tokyo 2020 president Yoshiro Mori said there is “absolutely no” chance of postponing the Games beyond their rescheduled July 23, 2021 opening, according to Kyodo News agency.The 2020 Olympics will be delayed for a year “Also thinking about athletes and issues over Games management, it is technically difficult to delay it by two years,” Mori was quoted as saying. Mori said he had earlier asked Prime Minister Shinzo Abe whether Japan should consider a two-year postponement but “the prime minister decided that one year is the way to go”. Under heavy pressure from athletes and sports associations, Japanese organisers and the International Olympic Committee in March agreed to a year-long postponement of the Games. Organisers and Japanese officials have said the delayed Olympics will be a chance to showcase the world’s triumph over the coronavirus, but questions have arisen about whether even a year’s postponement is sufficient. Earlier this week, a Japanese expert who has criticised the country’s response to the coronavirus warned he is “very pessimistic” that the postponed Olympics can be held in 2021. “To be honest with you, I don’t think the Olympics is likely to be held next year,” said Kentaro Iwata, a professor of infectious diseases at Kobe University.center_img Loading… last_img read more

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