Shelter choses Midland Software for personnel system

first_imgShelter choses Midland Software for personnel system About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 23 October 2002 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img  14 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The charity for homeless and badly housed people has selected Trent, Midland Software’s human resources system to service its personnel functions.Shelter, which has 850 employees based on 60 sites around the UK, has awarded a five-year contract to the Nottingham-based company. It selected the Trent core HR, payroll, recruitment and training modules.Midland Software was chosen after a competitive pitch involving Northgate and Shelter’s existing provider. Shelter hopes to benefit from improved integration between systems, thereby reducing double-keying and improving efficiency. Midland Software says that Trent will improve control of events through use of automated reminders and actions, and facilitate better, more accurate, management reporting. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Mactaggart says ‘I’ll deliver you the Charities Bill’

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell also spoke, stressing the importance of thelessons that the voluntary sector can teach the public sector – particularly in terms of developing personal relationships with clients. She called for this approach to be taken forward, ‘to wrap services around the people who need them’ – and she promised the Government’s support for voluntary sectorinnovation.The final speaker was Stuart Etherington of the NCVO. He praised the Government’s efforts on tax breaks for charities and the new relationship between the state and the voluntary sector. He looked forward to theTreasury review of the sector. Mr Etherington concluded by asking “where dowe go from here?”, stressing the importance of campaigning for the Charities Bill. Howard Lake | 30 September 2003 | News Tagged with: Recruitment / people Mactaggart says ‘I’ll deliver you the Charities Bill’center_img Home Office Minister Fiona Mactaggart told voluntary sector leaders at the Labour Party Conference that she would deliver a charities bill.Fiona Mactaggart MP was speaking at NCVO’s charities reception held at the Labour Party Conference on 29 September. She was joined by Gordon Brown, Tessa Jowell and many other MPs, senior opinion formers and voluntary sector leaders.Addressing the reception she said: “I’ll deliver you, I’m sure, the Charities Bill”. She continued by expressing her concern about the situation whereby the voluntary sector often seems to be ‘begging’ for favours from the Government. People must realise the important role played by the voluntary sector, the Minister insisted, suggesting that it can act as a kind of‘third way’ alongside the public and private sectors. Advertisement  50 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Charities still finding it difficult to recruit young trustees

first_img  20 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Management Research / statistics A report by the Charity Commission on the recruitment and induction of trustees reveals that nearly one third of charities say it is difficult to recruit young people as trustees.According to the Commission, about 890,000 people serve as trustees of registered charities in England and Wales. Fewer than 1% of them are under the age of 24, while nearly three quarters of them are over the age of 45. The Charity Commission’s new publication ‘Start as you mean to go on’ confirms that many charities are still finding it difficult to recruit young trustees. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 18 July 2005 | Newscenter_img Charities still finding it difficult to recruit young trustees About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The report finds that while more charities are planning and preparing carefully before recruiting, too too many are relying on more informal methods. Word of mouth is still the predominant method of recruiting for 81% of charities surveyed. The Commission warns that this type of recruitment should not be relied upon because charities could risk losing the benefit of having people from all backgrounds involved in their decision making. Only 70% of new trustees get a copy of the charity’s accounts, suggesting that many trustees are not given the right tools for the job. The Charity Commission recommends that all trustees should receive a copy of the charity’s accounts and its constitution.Linda Laurance, Chair of the Charity Trustee Networks, said: “Trustee recruitment continues to be one of the areas of greatest concern to boards and management committees, but often the approach falls well short of what will serve the board best. “This report from the Charity Commission provides further valuable ./guidance on good practice to help trustees manage the process, and thus not only improve their board’s effectiveness but ensure that new trustees are made welcome and equipped for their role.”The figures in the report were taken from the Charity Commission’s register of charities and from a large scale survey of 3,000 of the smallest to the very largest of registered charities in England and Wales.last_img read more

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CDF to run the Faith Communities Capacity Building Fund

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  24 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis CDF to run the Faith Communities Capacity Building Fund Howard Lake | 3 October 2005 | News Applicants must be based in England and/or Wales and be faith-based groups/organisations; inter-faith groups/organisations; or multicultural community centres and voluntary and community organisations carrying out inter-faith activities or working with faith communities. Applications are also open to partnerships between several faith or inter-faith groups/ organisations in an area.The closing date for applications is 2 December 2005. The Community Development Foundation (CDF) has been commissioned by the Cohesion and Faith Unit of the Home Office to run the Faith Communities Capacity Building Fund.The fund, which covers England and Wales, will support faith and inter-faith groups/organisations strengthen their capacity in order to play a fuller part in civil society/community cohesion. It will also fund inter-faith activities which increase community cohesion.The CDF is now inviting applications for small grants (up to £5,000) or large grants (over £5,000) which are available between January 2006 to March 2007. Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Wildlife Trusts’ joint income passes £100 million

first_imgWildlife Trusts’ joint income passes £100 million About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Wildlife Trusts have achieved a record combined income, reaching over £100 million for the first time. The Wildlife Trusts is a partnership of 47 local Wildlife Trusts across the UK, plus the Isle of Man and Alderney. Tagged with: Research / statisticscenter_img Howard Lake | 28 November 2005 | News  20 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Advertisementlast_img read more

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‘Charity’ publishing companies closed in the public interest

first_img Howard Lake | 15 March 2007 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis ‘Charity’ publishing companies closed in the public interest  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Two ‘charity publishers’ have been wound up in the public interest by the High Court in Manchester following an investigation by Companies Investigation Branch of the Insolvency Service. The companies misled those whom them sold advertising to in terms of the amount being donated to charity.Lancashire-based Hamilton Forbes Limited and Price Chamberlain Limited were set up to continue the business of charity publisher Barrington House Publishing Corporation Limited, which itself was wound up in October 2005.Investigators found that both Hamilton Forbes and Price Chamberlain sold advertising space in wall-planners to small businesses who were contacted by cold-calling, by many of the same staff, from the same premises, using the same methods and for the same charities asBarrington House. Advertisement Initially the companies failed to comply with Section 60 of the Charities Act 1992 and inform advertisers of the proportion of their fees which would be given to charity. Even though they latterly sent out statements, these were inaccurate, according to investigators.Advertisers were told that 15p in every pound would be given by Hamilton Forbes Limited to The Children’s Research Fund and 10p in every pound to the International League for Protection of Horses. In fact, less than 5p in every pound went to these charities.Advertisers with Price Chamberlain Limited were told 25p in every pound would go to the charity Kids in Need and Distress (KIND) but in reality it was 8p.The Insolvency Service found that advertisers were also misled as to the planned distribution of the wall-planners with telesales staff stating figures ranging from 100’s to 100,000 or “all hospitals”. In reality investigators found that the maximum distribution for any one wall planner was just 87 with the average closer to 67.The accounting records of both companies were “at best inaccurate and at worst misleading”, according to the Insolvency Service. Both companies appeared to be insolvent owing VAT and PAYE of over £250,000.The Official Receiver was appointed as provisional liquidator of each company on 29 January 2007 and the winding up orders were made on 13 March 2007. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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National survey of volunteering and charitable giving revealed

first_img Howard Lake | 11 September 2007 | News  20 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Research / statistics Volunteering AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Cabinet Office has published the results of a survey ‘Helping Out: A national survey of volunteering and charitable giving’ which examined how and why people engage in formal volunteering, and what they think of their experiences. It also looked at how and why they give money to charity, or what stops them.More than 2,700 people in England were interviewed, and most had given to charity in the preceding four weeks, most commonly through a collecting tin or buying raffle tickets. Almost half said they had increased the amount they gave since 2000 and just over a third gave more often. Around two thirds had heard of Gift Aid, but only a third had made use of it. Advertisementcenter_img Although almost all volunteers said that their efforts were appreciated, nearly a third said their volunteering could be better organised and that there was too much bureaucracy. Around 60 per cent of those interviewed had volunteered in the past 12 months, and most cited benefits of volunteering such as satisfaction from seeing the results, a sense of personal achievement and the opportunity to meet people and make new friends. National survey of volunteering and charitable giving revealed About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Record numbers raise money to build homes

first_img Howard Lake | 24 November 2008 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Ireland Volunteering  26 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Two thousand Irish volunteers having raised €1 million will set off for South Africa this week for the now annual effort to build homes for people living in poverty in the townships of Cape Town.The volunteers with the Niall Mellon Township Trust aim to complete over 250 houses in the course of their one week ‘building blitz’, providing homes for over 3,000 people in the Cape Town area.Property developer and founder of the trust, Niall Mellon, said the sixth annual ‘building blitz’ would be the largest to date. Some 700 of this year’s volunteers have taken part in the project before. The volunteers come from all walks of life, include all ages and come from right across the country. They include skilled trades people and senior executives, nurses, doctors, firemen and even a fisherman, Mr Mellon said. “A large number of our volunteers are from the construction sector. We are deeply humbled that they have worked so hard this year to raise the target of €5,000 each. Many of these people have had a tough year personally, some of them have been let go from their jobs and despite all of this, their determination has shone through and they have worked extra hard to raise the €5000,” Mr Mellon said.Some 5,000 volunteers have worked on the annual building project since its inception in 2002 and the charity has built over 10,000 houses.www.irishtownship.com Record numbers raise money to build homeslast_img read more

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Woolworth’s charity to continue

first_imgWoolworth’s charity to continue Howard Lake | 17 December 2008 | News Tagged with: corporate recession About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Woolworths Kids First, the charity supported by failing retailer Woolworths plc, has pledged to carry on operating under the new name ‘Kids First Trust’.Launched in 1999, Woolworths Kids First was set up to enable Woolworths’ employees to support community-based projects of their choice to benefit children. It operated at a local level to support projects near Woolworths shops.On Kids First Trust’s Facebook page the staff report that “the team have decided to continue running the charity wholly independently”. They add that “over the next few months we will be working hard to find new premises, new partners and relaunch our work”.London newspaper Metro reports that Woolworths will today announce all its British stores will be closed by January 4 – with the loss of 29,000 jobs, so the charity, which has several months operating reserves, will need to develop new sources of income quickly.  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Charity Commission warns charities of direct debit fraud scams

first_img Howard Lake | 21 January 2010 | News Charity Commission warns charities of direct debit fraud scams RedressUnder the direct debit guarantee scheme, if the charity has been wrongly paying a direct debit, it can reclaim this money from the bank. It is then the bank’s responsibility to reclaim this money from the supplier.A spokesperson for Bacs Payment Schemes Limited said: “Paperless Direct Debit is a highly reliable, safe and cost effective method for organisations, including charities, to collect regular payments. Instances of Direct Debit fraud are very low when compared with alternative payment methods like cheque or card.“We treat any instances of Direct Debit fraud extremely seriously, even when they take place rarely. We are pleased to work with the Charity Commission in providing this alert to the charity sector”.Bacs added its own advice:Organisations setting up non-paper Direct Debit Instructions must verify the identity of the Payer prior to collecting any money; the methods used vary depending upon the associated commercial risk – all are agreed and approved by the organisation’s sponsoring bank.For organisations providing services and goods, for example, Bacs makes a list of stringent verification measures available in a secure area of its website. However, for obvious reasons, and in the interest of fraud prevention, these measures must remain confidential.Organisations collecting by Direct Debit must also confirm, in writing, the Instruction given by the customer within three days of setting up the Direct Debit. Alternatively the organisation must write and give Advance Notice of the transaction, normally ten working days prior to it leaving the customer’s account. In line with standard banking industry recommendations, all consumers are advised to keep their personal details secure, regularly check their bank statements, monitor their bank balance, open all post and dispose of it with care.The Charity Commission publishes information about charity trustees’ legal duties and responsibilities for ensuring strong financial controls in its ./guidance CC8 Internal Financial Controls for Charities.www.charitycommission.gov.uk About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The Charity Commission is warning charities of the danger of fraudulent direct debits being set up from charity bank accounts. It has been made aware of a number of instances where this has happened, resulting in the abuse of charity funds.What can charities do? The Commission is publishing the following advice for charities on its website:PreventionWrite to your bank and inform them that no further direct debits should be set up without the specific approval of certain named authorised personnel.DetectionYou should ensure that you regularly check your bank statements and ensure the bank statements reconcile with the charity records. Any unexplained or unusual direct debits must be investigated. Advertisementcenter_img Tagged with: Charity Commission Individual giving Law / policy AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3  76 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3last_img read more

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