Frankfurter Tor Student Apartments / GBP Architeken

first_imgArchDaily Germany “COPY” CopyApartments, Dorms•Berlín, Germany Frankfurter Tor Student Apartments / GBP Architeken 2017 Photographs:  Anastasia HermannSave this picture!© Anastasia HermannRecommended ProductsResidential ApplicationsCymat Technologies Ltd.Hudson Valley Home, USA – Alusion™ Stabilized Aluminum FoamResidential ApplicationsULMA Architectural SolutionsAir Facade Panels in Fonsanta RestaurationWindowsSky-FrameRetractable Insect Screen – Sky-Frame FlyEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreText description provided by the architects. The property at Frankfurter Tor is located in an exposed location in the Friedrichshain district in the middle of a residential and business district with typical Berlin apartment buildings. It also borders on the listed building ensemble designed by architect Hermann Henselmann along the Karl-Marx-Allee / Frankfurter Allee street.Save this picture!© Anastasia HermannSave this picture!Ground floor plan 01Save this picture!© Anastasia HermannThe apartment ensemble of student apartments and micro apartments comprises a total of 567 apartment units with 485 student apartments and 82 micro apartments, which are grouped around an attractively designed courtyard.Save this picture!© Anastasia HermannThe part of the building facing the Frankfurter Tor received a roof structure as an additional staggered floor. The spacious lobby serves as a central attraction and invites you to linger through various niches. The entrance area includes other publicly accessible areas such as seminar and event areas, laundromat and retail areas, fitness studio and deli / restaurant. In addition, the use of the terraces is kept open for small seating areas and catering facilities.Save this picture!© Anastasia HermannSave this picture!© Anastasia HermannThe inner courtyard is designed as a multifunctional green oasis. There are extensive green areas for relaxation, community spaces, seating islands and sufficient bicycle parking spaces.Save this picture!© Anastasia HermannProject gallerySee allShow lessOn Finding Motivation to Keep Practice Architecture and Age Significance When Gettin…ArticlesHouse – ConceptsArticlesProject locationAddress:Friedrichshain, Berlin, GermanyLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Frankfurter Tor Student Apartments / GBP ArchitekenSave this projectSaveFrankfurter Tor Student Apartments / GBP ArchitekenPresented by: ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/936844/frankfurter-tor-student-apartments-gbp-architeken Clipboard Year:  “COPY” Projects Apartments ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/936844/frankfurter-tor-student-apartments-gbp-architeken Clipboard Architects: GBP Architeken Area Area of this architecture project Area:  25711 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Save this picture!© Anastasia Hermann+ 22Curated by Paula Pintos Share CopyAbout this officeGBP ArchitekenOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsEducational ArchitectureOther facilitiesDormsBerlinGerman Design CouncilBerlínGermanyPublished on April 04, 2020Cite: “Frankfurter Tor Student Apartments / GBP Architeken” 04 Apr 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ NaturalPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Mirage®WindowsVitrocsaSliding Window – Mosquito NetSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Verge LVG-SeriesMetal PanelsTrimoQbiss One in Equinix Data CentreSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassMetal PanelsLongboard®Aluminum Battens – Link & Lock – 4″Sports ApplicationsPunto DesignPunto Fit in Ekaterinburg Public SpaceWoodBlumer LehmannFree Form Structures for Wood ProjectsKnobsKarcher DesignDoor Knob K390 (50)TablesVitsœ621 Side TableMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Photographslast_img read more

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New open software standard for non-profit sector announced

 15 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis UK Fundraising will report further developments on this exciting example of collaboration within the non-profit supplier sector. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The Chronicle of Philanthropy has announced that a new open software standard for the non-profit sector is about to be launched in the USA. The Open Philanthropy eXchange, or OPX, will enable participating organisations to streamline the receipt and management of data related to online donations. The Chronicle of Philanthropy has announced that a new open software standard for the non-profit sector is about to be launched in the USA. The Open Philanthropy eXchange, or OPX, will enable participating organisations to streamline the receipt and management of data related to online donations. Charities using OPX-compliant software will be able to download such donation and donor detail directly into their supporter database.The companies behind this welcome initiative are Blackbaud, Inc, CharitableWay.com and MyAssociation.com. Advertisement New open software standard for non-profit sector announced Howard Lake | 18 July 2000 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis read more

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The cold scoop: Ranking the best ice cream shops in Fort Worth

first_imgRELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR What we’re reading: Prince Philip dies at 99, President Biden unveils spending proposal Linkedin Linkedin Fifth annual Drew Medford Memorial Tournament honors former Paschal pitcher, awards 20 scholarships Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Lucy Puentehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/lucy-puente/ Twitter Lucy Puentehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/lucy-puente/ Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store ReddIt Lucy Puentehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/lucy-puente/ Lucy Puente Thousands turn out to try pop-up Turkey Leg Hut Facebook The 109The 109 NewsThe cold scoop: Ranking the best ice cream shops in Fort WorthBy Lucy Puente – March 22, 2021 1121 Twitter ReddIt Previous articleHoroscope: March 22, 2021Next articleWhat we’re reading: Miami declares state of emergency, Trump eyes his own social network Lucy Puente + posts printWhether it’s a treat with friends, a date night or a reward after a long day full of studying, many TCU students agree that ice cream hits the spot. Fort Worth has many ice cream options to offer to students and luckily, they’re all near the TCU campus. Here are seven of the closest and tastiest ice cream destinations to try, rated on proximity to campus, price, texture, variety and how much ice cream was given in a small sized cup.The Rankings 7. Cow Tipping CreameryProximity: 3.2 milesPrice: $3.50 + $1 for extra toppingsTexture: soft serve Variety: 3 flavors, 22 toppingsSize of small: runs largeOverall Score: 2.5/5Small cup of vanilla soft serve with sprinkles (Lucy Puente/TCU360)Despite being 3.2 miles from campus, Cow Tipping Creamery had to come last. With only three flavors to choose from, vanilla, chocolate and swirl, the ice cream was a regular soft serve that you could find at a Chick-fil-A or McDonald’s. Multiple toppings are an option here, but their ice cream did not offer the same variety that other creameries in Fort Worth did.6. Dairy Queen Proximity: 5.5 milesPrice: $1.29 + $1 for extra toppingsTexture: soft serve Variety: 2 flavors, 35-40 toppingsSize of small: true to sizeOverall Score: 3/5Small chocolate dipped vanilla soft serve in a sugar cone (Lucy Puente/TCU360)The “stop sign of Texas” makes their signature blizzards and sundaes a staple; however, if you are looking for more variety this is not the place to go. Dairy Queen only offers soft serve ice cream with two flavors, but makes sure their toppings are the focus of the menu. Dairy Queen is more of a hit or miss kind of ice cream, when the line is long, the ice cream suffers and can be melty. 5. Melt: Proximity: 3.4 milesPrice: $3.75 + .50 for extra toppingsTexture: creamy Variety: 12 flavorsSize of small: smaller than expectedOverall Score: 3.5/5Small cup of scooped ‘beans’ with sprinkles (Lucy Puente/TCU360)The aesthetic of Melt seems to be the focus of their business and is what customers pay for. Being on the pricier side of the ice cream destinations, Melt is more of a place for Instagram pictures. The 12 flavors offered are unique to their menu and grab the attention of trendy college students. 4. Curly’s CustardProximity: 4.8 milesPrice: $3.39 + .75 cents for extra toppingsTexture: custardVariety: 5 flavors, 33 toppingsSize of small: runs largeOverall Score: 4/5Small cup of vanilla custard with sprinkles blended in (Lucy Puente/TCU360)Curly’s Custard is the creamy ice cream to enjoy on a warm sunny day in Texas; however, offering no indoor seating makes the drive-thru the better option when the weather is rough. The prices are fair and many toppings are offered to customers allowing a variety of combinations to create unique sundaes with both dairy and dairy-free options. 3. Marble Slab CreameryProximity: 2.1 milesPrice: $4.49 + .59 cents for extra toppingsTexture: buttery and smoothVariety: 22 flavors, 40+ toppingsSize of small: true to sizeOverall Score: 4.5 /5Small cup of vanilla with sprinkles rolled in (Lucy Puente/TCU360)Being the second closest ice cream destination to the TCU campus, Marble Slab offers buttery and smooth ice cream. When ordered, the ice cream is put on a chilled marble slab where customers choose their desired toppings to be mixed in. The location is owned by a married couple who are TCU graduates. 2. CreamistryProximity: 4.3 milesPrice: $6.44+ .50 for extra toppings + free whipped creamTexture: LuciousVariety: 18 flavors, 35 toppingsSize of small: runs largeOverall Score: 4.5/5Small cup of nitro-frozen vanilla with sprinkles and whipped cream (Lucy Puente/TCU360)Liquid Nitrogen made ice cream. Creamistry offers hundreds of combinations and flavors of ice cream. All of the dairy ice cream flavors are offered as non-dairy and vegan-friendly options making the sundae creations endless. Once ordered, the ice cream is made before your eyes by adding a cloud of liquid nitrogen to a bowl of your liquid ice cream base of choice. Even though Creamistry is an investment, the free whipped cream and fresh ice cream make the price worth it. 1. Braum’sProximity: 2 milesPrice: $1.59 + 1 free topping and .25 cents for extra toppingsTexture: Thick and creamy Variety: 27 flavors, 35 toppingsSize of small: true to size in a cup, runs large in a cone Overall Score: 5/5Small cup of scooped vanilla with whipped cream and sprinkles (Lucy Puente/TCU360)A classic wallet-friendly ice cream. Braum’s offers 27 flavors and a variety of seasonal flavors, classic toppings, sundaes and cones. With the cheapest price of all the competitors and a wide array of flavors, the combinations are limitless. Braum’s is a Southern exclusive ice cream destination and will leave you wanting their creamy and thick ice cream every day. Facebook Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturdaylast_img read more

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Many detainees beaten during police search of Evin prison

first_img IranMiddle East – North Africa Organisation Help by sharing this information IranMiddle East – North Africa News Reporters Without Borders firmly condemns yesterday’s grave violations of the rights of political prisoners in Tehran’s Evin prison.Around 100 riot police, accompanied by Revolutionary Guards and Intelligence Ministry officials in civilian dress, began a major inspection of the cells in Section 350, where political prisoners are held, at around 9 a.m. yesterday.According to relatives, when the prisoners objected to this irregular search and stayed in their cells to monitor their belongings, the police responded to the protest with extreme violence, smashing TV sets, equipment and personal effects.Dozens of detainees were beaten and then placed in solitary confinement in Security Section 240, regardless of their injuries. They included journalists and bloggers such as Mohammad Sadegh Kabovand, Hossein Ronaghi Malki, Mohammad Davari, Said Matinpour, Siamak Qaderi, Said Haeri and Yashar Darolshafa.They also included human rights lawyers Abdolfattah Soltani and Hotain Dolati, and Behnam Ebrahimzadeh, an activist in the workers’ movement.“This government respects nothing, neither international law nor its own Islamic laws,” said Réza Moïni, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Iran-Afghanistan desk. “The violence used against these prisoners was gratuitous and cowardly, and was clearly designed to punish heroes who have continued to resist despite having suffered years of oppression. This is also a warning to Iranian civil society, which keeps on demanding more freedom and democracy.“The families of the detainees who have been placed in solitary have no news of them and are very worried. We share their concern and we call on the government to give firm guarantees that these prisoners of conscience will be protected.”Moïni added: “UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pilly and the UN special rapporteur on the human rights situation in Iran, Ahmed Shaheed, must intervene as quickly as possible and put pressure on the Iranian authorities to protect these human rights defender and journalists in danger.”In an interview for the ILNA news agency, Iranian prison system director Golamhossien Esmaili denied “the false reports and rumours published by enemy news sites.” Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists Iran is stepping up pressure on journalists, including foreign journalists, in run-up to election News RSF_en April 18, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Many detainees beaten during police search of Evin prison June 9, 2021 Find out more June 11, 2021 Find out more to go further Nonetheless, according to the information obtained by Reporters Without Borders, the operation was prepared and organized by senior officials in the justice system, information department, Revolutionary Guards and Intelligence Ministry, and the presence of representatives from all of these departments during the raid was no coincidence. News March 18, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Follow the news on Iran News Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020last_img read more

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Russia: Telegram block leads to widespread assault on freedom of expression online

first_img Organisation RSF_en Follow the news on Russia Credit: Alexander Nemenov / AFP RussiaEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesOnline freedoms Judicial harassmentFreedom of expressionCouncil of EuropeInternet Listed as a “foreign agent”, Russia’s most popular independent website risks disappearing RussiaEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesOnline freedoms Judicial harassmentFreedom of expressionCouncil of EuropeInternet Two Russian journalists persecuted for investigating police corruption June 2, 2021 Find out more Desisting from blocking Telegram and refraining from requiring messaging services, such as Telegram, to provide decryption keys in order to access users private communications; Repealing provisions in the ‘Yarovaya Law’ requiring Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to store all telecommunications data for six months and imposing mandatory cryptographic backdoors, and the 2014 Data Localisation law, which grant security service easy access to users’ data without sufficient safeguards. Repealing Federal Law 241-FZ, which bans anonymity for users of online messaging applications; and Law 276-FZ which prohibits VPNs and Internet anonymisers from providing access to websites banned in Russia; Amending Federal Law 149-FZ “On Information, IT Technologies and Protection of Information” so that the process of blocking websites meets international standards. Any decision to block access to a website or app should be undertaken by an independent court and be limited by requirements of necessity and proportionality for a legitimate aim. In considering whether to grant a blocking order, the court or other independent body authorised to issue such an order should consider its impact on lawful content and what technology may be used to prevent over-blocking. Representatives of the United Nations (UN), the Council of Europe (CoE), the Organisation for the Cooperation and Security in Europe (OSCE), the European Union (EU), the United States and other concerned governments to scrutinise and publicly challenge Russia’s actions in order to uphold the fundamental rights to freedom of expression and privacy both online and-offline, as stipulated in binding international agreements to which Russia is a party. Internet companies to resist orders that violate international human rights law. Companies should follow the United Nations’ Guiding Principles on Business & Human Rights, which emphasise that the responsibility to respect human rights applies throughout a company’s global operations regardless of where its users are located and exists independently of whether the State meets its own human rights obligations. Signed by Update (16.05.2018): Shortly after Russia started to restrict access to Telegram by blocking millions of IP addresses at the end of April, a coalition of 26 international organisations published an initial statement (see below), condemning Russia’s actions and calling on the authorities to uphold freedom of expression. This caught the attention of other international as well as domestic organisations that have subsequently added their backing to the call. The group now includes 53 international and Russian human rights, media and internet freedom organisations.Read the updated statement in EnglishЧитать обновленную версию на русском30.04.2018 – Russia: Telegram block leads to widespread assault on freedom of expression onlineЧитать на русском / Read in RussianWe, the undersigned 26 international human rights, media and Internet freedom organisations, strongly condemn the attempts by the Russian Federation to block the Internet messaging service Telegram, which have resulted in extensive violations of freedom of expression and access to information, including mass collateral website blocking.We call on Russia to stop blocking Telegram and cease its relentless attacks on Internet freedom more broadly. We also call the United Nations (UN), the Council of Europe (CoE), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the European Union (EU), the United States and other concerned governments to challenge Russia’s actions and uphold the fundamental rights to freedom of expression and privacy online as well as offline. Lastly, we call on Internet companies to resist unfounded and extra-legal orders that violate their users’ rights. Massive Internet disruptionsOn 13 April 2018, Moscow’s Tagansky District Court granted Roskomnadzor, Russia’s communications regulator, its request to block access to Telegram on the grounds that the company had not complied with a 2017 order to provide decryption keys to the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB). Since then, the actions taken by the Russian authorities to restrict access to Telegram have caused mass Internet disruption, including: Between 16-18 April 2018, almost 20 million Internet Protocol (IP) addresses were ordered to be blocked by Roskomnadzor as it attempted to restrict access to Telegram. The majority of the blocked addresses are owned by international Internet companies, including Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Currently 14.6 remain blocked. This mass blocking of IP addresses has had a detrimental effect on a wide range of web-based services that have nothing to do with Telegram, including, but not limited to, online banking and booking sites, shopping, and flight reservations. Agora, the human rights and legal group, representing Telegram in Russia, has reported it has received requests for assistance with issues arising from the mass blocking from about 60 companies, including online stores, delivery services, and software developers. At least six online media outlets (Petersburg Diary, Coda Story, FlashNord, FlashSiberia, Tayga.info, and 7×7) found access to their websites was temporarily blocked. On 17 April 2018, Roskomnadzor requested that Google and Apple remove access to the Telegram app from their App stores, despite having no basis in Russian law to make this request. The app remains available, but Telegram has not been able to provide upgrades that would allow better proxy access for users. Virtual Private Network (VPN) providers – such as TgVPN, Le VPN and VeeSecurity proxy – have also been targeted for providing alternative means to access Telegram. Federal Law 276-FZ bans VPNs and Internet anonymisers from providing access to websites banned in Russia and authorises Roskomnadzor to order the blocking of any site explaining how to use these services.Restrictive Internet lawsOver the past six years, Russia has adopted a huge raft of laws restricting freedom of expression and the right to privacy online. These include the creation in 2012 of a blacklist of Internet websites, managed by Roskomnadzor, and the incremental extension of the grounds upon which websites can be blocked, including without a court order.The 2016 so-called ‘Yarovaya Law’, justified on the grounds of “countering extremism”, requires all communications providers and Internet operators to store metadata about their users’ communications activities, to disclose decryption keys at the security services’ request, and to use only encryption methods approved by the Russian government – in practical terms, to create a backdoor for Russia’s security agents to access internet users’ data, traffic, and communications.In October 2017, a magistrate found Telegram guilty of an administrative offense for failing to provide decryption keys to the Russian authorities – which the company states it cannot do due to Telegram’s use of end-to-end encryption. The company was fined 800,000 rubles (approx. 11,000 EUR). Telegram lost an appeal against the administrative charge in March 2018, giving the Russian authorities formal grounds to block Telegram in Russia, under Article 15.4 of the Federal Law “On Information, Information Technologies and Information Protection”.The Russian authorities’ latest move against Telegram demonstrates the serious implications for people’s freedom of expression and right to privacy online in Russia and worldwide: For Russian users apps such as Telegram and similar services that seek to provide secure communications are crucial for users’ safety. They provide an important source of information on critical issues of politics, economics and social life, free of undue government interference. For media outlets and journalists based in and outside Russia, Telegram serves not only as a messaging platform for secure communication with sources, but also as a publishing venue. Through its channels, Telegram acts as a carrier and distributor of content for entire media outlets as well as for individual journalists and bloggers. In light of direct and indirect state control over many traditional Russian media and the self-censorship many other media outlets feel compelled to exercise, instant messaging channels like Telegram have become a crucial means of disseminating ideas and opinions. Companies that comply with the requirements of the ‘Yarovaya Law’ by allowing the government a back-door key to their services jeopardise the security of the online communications of their Russian users and the people they communicate with abroad. Journalists, in particular, fear that providing the FSB with access to their communications would jeopardise their sources, a cornerstone of press freedom. Company compliance would also signal that communication services providers are willing to compromise their encryption standards and put the privacy and security of all their users at risk, as a cost of doing business. Beginning in July 2018, other articles of the ‘Yarovaya Law’ will come into force requiring companies to store the content of all communications for six months and to make them accessible to the security services without a court order. This would affect the communications of both people in Russia and abroad. Such attempts by the Russian authorities to control online communications and invade privacy go far beyond what can be considered necessary and proportionate to countering terrorism and violate international law.International standards News Blocking websites or apps is an extreme measure, analogous to banning a newspaper or revoking the license of a TV station. As such, it is highly likely to constitute a disproportionate interference with freedom of expression and media freedom in the vast majority of cases, and must be subject to strict scrutiny. At a minimum, any blocking measures should be clearly laid down by law and require the courts to examine whether the wholesale blocking of access to an online service is necessary and in line with the criteria established and applied by the European Court of Human Rights. Blocking Telegram and the accompanying actions clearly do not meet this standard. Various requirements of the ‘Yarovaya Law’ are plainly incompatible with international standards on encryption and anonymity as set out in the 2015 report of the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression report (A/HRC/29/32). The UN Special Rapporteur himself has written to the Russian government raising serious concerns that the ‘Yarovaya Law’ unduly restricts the rights to freedom of expression and privacy online. In the European Union, the Court of Justice has ruled that similar data retention obligations were incompatible with the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights. Although the European Court of Human Rights has not yet ruled on the compatibility of the Russian provisions for the disclosure of decryption keys with the European Convention on Human Rights, it has found that Russia’s legal framework governing interception of communications does not provide adequate and effective guarantees against the arbitrariness and the risk of abuse inherent in any system of secret surveillance.We, the undersigned organisations, call on: center_img Help by sharing this information News May 21, 2021 Find out more to go further News May 16, 2018 Russia: Telegram block leads to widespread assault on freedom of expression online Related documents russia_telegram_statement_-_final_300418_russian.pdfPDF – 504.36 KBrussia_telegram_statement_-_final_160518_eng.pdfPDF – 3.42 MBrussia_telegram_statement_-_final_160518_ru.pdfPDF – 3.28 MB The Russian authorities to guarantee internet users’ right to publish and browse anonymously and ensure that any restrictions to online anonymity are subject to requirements of a court order, and comply fully with Articles 17 and 19(3) of the ICCPR, and articles 8 and 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights, by: ARTICLE 19 Agora International Access Now Amnesty International Asociatia pentru Tehnologie si Internet – ApTI Associação D3 – Defesa dos Direitos Digitais Committee to Protect Journalists Civil Rights Defenders Electronic Frontier Foundation Electronic Frontier Norway Electronic Privacy Information Centre (EPIC) Freedom House Human Rights House Foundation Human Rights Watch Index on Censorship International Media Support International Partnership for Human Rights ISOC Bulgaria Open Media Open Rights Group PEN America PEN International Privacy International Reporters Without Borders (RSF) WWW Foundation Xnet Receive email alerts Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown News May 5, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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RSF partners receive French human rights award

first_img June 4, 2021 Find out more News June 7, 2021 Find out more News News RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan France’s National Consultative Commission for Human Rights (CNCDH) awards the prizes, which are being presented today by Christine Lazerges, the commission’s president, and justice minister Nicole Belloubet.Freedom Network, RSF’s partner organization in Pakistan, plays a key role in that country in defending the freedom to inform and promoting ethical and independent journalism. It monitors press freedom violations, works to strengthen the safety of media and journalists, and lobbies the government for better media laws. Its executive director, Iqbal Khattak, is RSF’s representative in Pakistan. It was awarded the prize for a project promoting respect for religious minorities and non-believers within the Pakistani media.The Initiative Centre for the Caucasus is a Russian NGO that publishes Dosh, a magazine that is one of the few independent media outlets covering political and social developments in Chechnya and nearby regions. RSF works closely with the centre and awarded its Press Freedom Prize to Dosh in 2009. Amid the fear and arbitrary rule that characterize Chechnya today, one can only admire its reporters and its editors, Abdulkhazhi Duduyev and Israpil Shavkhalov. As well as publishing Dosh, the centre has opened a press and resources centre for civil society in Grozny, launched a women’s magazine, run a legal centre and organized seminars on a range of sensitive issues including independent reporting for young journalism students.”We are pleased to see two of our partner organizations receiving this prestigious award for their activities in defence of human rights,” RSF secretary-general Christophe Deloire said. “As well as constituting an important recognition of their enormous efforts and commitment in the field, this prize is a powerful message from the French Republic to all those who fight to defend the freedom to inform at a time when authoritarian centres of power are trying to increase their influence and impose their antagonistic alternative model.” RussiaPakistanFranceEurope – Central AsiaAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ViolenceFreedom of expressionRSF Prize Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia The two NGOs that are receiving the French Republic’s Human Rights Prize in the “Freedom of Information, Press Freedom and Journalism” category today – Pakistan’s Freedom Network and Russia’s Initiative Centre for the Caucasus – are both closely linked to Reporters Without Borders (RSF). RussiaPakistanFranceEurope – Central AsiaAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ViolenceFreedom of expressionRSF Prize RSF_en News June 8, 2021 Find out more Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says Organisation to go further “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says December 12, 2017 RSF partners receive French human rights awardlast_img read more

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AmTrust Announces Quarterly Cash Dividends on Preferred Stock

first_imgLocal NewsBusiness Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – February 8, 2021 7.625% 6.750% 7.750% A NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 8, 2021– AmTrust Financial Services, Inc. (“AmTrust” or the “Company”) today announced that its Board of Directors has approved a cash dividend per share on the following series of non-cumulative preferred stock: Series B $0.421875 WhatsApp 7.500% D Dividend WhatsApp $0.484375 7.250% Previous articleVortus Investments Announces the Promotions of Brian Hansen, Frank Lamsens and Ross CunninghamNext articleSeagate Technology to Host a Virtual Analyst Event on February 24, 2021 Digital AIM Web Supportcenter_img E C $0.476563 Twitter Twitter Pinterest The preferred dividends will be payable March 15, 2021 to stockholders of record on March 1, 2021. About AmTrust Financial Services, Inc. AmTrust Financial Services, Inc., a multinational insurance holding company headquartered in New York, offers specialty property and casualty insurance products, including workers’ compensation, business owner’s policy (BOP), general liability and extended service and warranty coverage. For more information about AmTrust, visit www.amtrustfinancial.com. View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210208005204/en/ CONTACT: AmTrust Financial Services Chaya Cooperberg EVP, Chief People and Communications Officer [email protected] (646) 458-3332 KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA NEW YORK INDUSTRY KEYWORD: FINANCE BANKING PROFESSIONAL SERVICES OTHER PROFESSIONAL SERVICES INSURANCE SOURCE: AmTrust Financial Services, Inc. Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/08/2021 08:30 AM/DISC: 02/08/2021 08:30 AM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210208005204/en F $0.453125 Pinterest TAGS  6.950% $0.468750 Rate $0.434375 AmTrust Announces Quarterly Cash Dividends on Preferred Stock Facebooklast_img read more

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Irrational And Indiscriminate Arrests Are Gross Violation Of Human Rights, Arrest Should Be The Last Option For The Police: Allahabad High Court

first_imgNews UpdatesIrrational And Indiscriminate Arrests Are Gross Violation Of Human Rights, Arrest Should Be The Last Option For The Police: Allahabad High Court Sparsh Upadhyay8 Jan 2021 10:33 PMShare This – xThe Allahabad High Court on Wednesday (06th January) observed that after the lodging of FIR, the arrest can be made by the police at will and that there is no definite period fixed for the police to arrest an accused against whom an FIR has been lodged. The Bench of Justice Siddharth, however, noted that arrest should be the last option for the police and it should be restricted…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Allahabad High Court on Wednesday (06th January) observed that after the lodging of FIR, the arrest can be made by the police at will and that there is no definite period fixed for the police to arrest an accused against whom an FIR has been lodged. The Bench of Justice Siddharth, however, noted that arrest should be the last option for the police and it should be restricted to “those exceptional cases where arresting the accused is imperative or his custodial interrogation is required.” The matter before the Court The Bench was hearing an anticipatory bail plea filed on behalf of the applicant, one Sachin Saini, in connection with a case registered under Section-452, 323, 504, 506 IPC. The applicant’s Counsel submitted before the Court that earlier, applicant’s father had lodged an FIR against the son of the informant on 24th August 2020 under Sections 147, 148, 323, 504, 506 I.P.C. It was contended that by way of counter blast, the FIR in the instant matter had been lodged on 20th September 2020 implicating the applicant in the case falsely. It was also argued that the allegations are absolutely incorrect and no injury was suffered. The applicant expressed his apprehension that he may be arrested by the police any time. Court’s Order After considering the submissions, the Court concluded that there was a case registered/about to be registered against the applicant. Importantly, the Court said, “In the case of Joginder Kumar v. State of Uttar Pradesh AIR 1994 SC 1349 the Apex Court has referred to the third report of National Police Commission wherein it is mentioned that arrests by the police in India is one of the chief sources of corruption in the police.” The Court further said, “The report suggested that, by and large, nearly 60 percent of the arrests were either unnecessary or unjustified and that such unjustified police action accounted for 43.2 percent of expenditure of the jails.” Underlining that irrational and indiscriminate arrests are gross violation of human rights, the Court remarked, “Personal liberty is a very precious fundamental rights and it should be curtailed only when it becomes imperative. According to the peculiar facts and circumstances of the peculiar case the arrest of an accused should be made.” Lastly, the Court directed that the applicant involved in the instant crime be released on anticipatory bail on furnishing a personal bond with two sureties each in the like amount to the satisfaction of the trial court. Case title – Sachin Saini v. State Of U.P. And 2 Others [Criminal Misc Anticipatory Bail Application U/S 438 CR.P.C. No. – 9391 of 2020] Click Here To Download OrderRead OrderNext Storylast_img read more

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7-year-old girl shot and killed in car in Walmart parking lot; gunman still at large: Authorities

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(HOUSTON) — A 7-year-old girl was shot and killed in a Walmart parking lot in Houston early Sunday when a gunman opened fire on a vehicle she was traveling in with her mother and three other young girls, authorities said.The girl, who has not been identified, was leaving the Walmart at 15491 Wallisville at Beltway in the Wallisville section at about 7 a.m. when an unknown man shot into their car, according to the Harris County Sheriff’s Office. “Mother & daughter were in a car leaving a store when an unknown male began shooting into their car for an unknown reason,” Sheriff Ed Gonzalez tweeted.Jesse Razo, a major with the Sheriff’s Office, said a news briefing that the suspect was driving a red pickup truck with no plates.The suspect “pulled up next to the vehicle and began shooting into the vehicle,” Razo said. The girl’s mother was shot, too, Gonzalez said. She was wounded in the arm but is expected to survive, officials said.In addition to the girl and her mother, two teenagers and a younger girl were also in the car, Gonzalez said: the teen girls were not hurt, and the girl suffered “glass fragment injuries.”Razo said the girls were “shaken” and “devastated.” The suspect, who was wearing a red hoodie, fled in a red truck, Gonzalez said. He was described as being in his 40s and having a beard, Razo said.He was still at large as of Sunday morning.“He is considered armed and dangerous,” Razo said.The motive for the shooting was not immediately known. Homicide detectives were scouring the area and checking surveillance video for clues.“We’re going to use all resources available to bring this killer to justice,” Razo said.He urged the suspect to surrender.“Because we will be looking for you, we will locate you, we will find you,” Razo said.The Sheriff’s Office urged anyone with information to call 911, tweet at @CrimeStopHOU or call 713-222-TIPS.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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D region reflection height modification by whistler-induced electron precipitation

first_imgWe examine the electron density profile expected in the lower ionosphere due to a 0.2-s whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP) burst with experimentally determined properties. The ionization rate in the lower ionosphere due to a single such WEP event has a height variation with a rather broad maximum, leading to additional electron densities of ∼5 electrons cm−3 stretching over altitudes of ∼75–92 km. For ambient nighttime conditions a single WEP burst with these parameters will lead to a significant electron density changes only for altitudes below ∼85 km. We go on to consider the cumulative response of the nighttime D region to a sustained series of WEP bursts observed through Trimpi perturbation activity on one night in the Antarctic. For altitudes >70 km, significant long-term changes in electron densities due to WEP bursts can occur. The additional WEP-produced ionization leads to increases in the high-altitude electron densities, until a new equilibrium level is reached. Peak changes in electron density are ∼16 times ambient at 85 km and ∼7 times ambient at 90 km, occurring in the ∼15-min period during which the WEP rate is at its peak (∼4.5 per min). The simulation suggests that electron density levels “settle” into an new quasi-equilibrium state during the ∼3-hour period where the ionization at 85-km altitude is 10–12 times ambient due to WEP bursts occur at ∼3 min−1. The ionization changes produced by WEP bursts lead to lower reflection heights for VLF and LF radio waves (in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide). While significant short-term changes in reflection heights are likely, realistic long-term changes in WEP occurrence rates do not appear likely to be able to explain the reported ∼2 km decrease in LF reflection heights observed during the last 35 years.last_img read more

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