Personal lender records gains

first_img whatsapp Show Comments ▼ Personal lender records gains Wednesday 2 March 2011 8:38 pm International Personal Finance, the emerging markets lender, expects to make further progress this year after growth in its main markets propelled a sharp rise in 2010 profits.International Personal Finance’s pre-tax profit for the year to December rose 49.3 per cent to £92.1m, compared with a market forecast of £93.5m. The firm operates in eastern European countries such as Poland, Hungary and Czech Republic, and also has a business in Mexico.“In 2011 we expect positive economic conditions in our markets and so aim to grow customers and credit issued at higher levels than 2010 and, therefore, expect the group will continue to make good progress,” said chief executive John Harnett. whatsapp Read This NextRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe WrapCNN’s Brian Stelter Draws Criticism for Asking Jen Psaki: ‘What Does theThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapPink Floyd’s Roger Waters Denies Zuckerberg’s Request to Use Song in Ad:The WrapHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe Wrap2 HFPA Members Resign Citing a Culture of ‘Corruption and Verbal Abuse’The Wrap’Black Widow’ First Reactions: ‘This Is Like the MCU’s Bond Movie’The Wrap’The View’: Meghan McCain Calls VP Kamala Harris a ‘Moron’ for BorderThe WrapKatt Williams Explains Why He Believes There ‘Is No Cancel Culture’ inThe Wrap KCS-content Share Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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GBGC launches consultation on LCCP reporting changes

first_img GBGC launches consultation on LCCP reporting changes 4th March 2020 | By Daniel O’Boyle Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter The British Gambling Commission has launched a consultation on potential changes to the licence conditions and codes of practice (LCCP) which all licensees must adhere to, mostly to change the ways in which licensees must report key events to the regulator.The consultation opened on 26 February and will last until 20 May. In total, the Commission has proposed changes to 17 different articles of the LCCP.The changes would remove the phrase “Ensure that the Commission is provided [with information]” concerning possible offences under the 2005 Gambling Act or breaches of the LCCP.This, the regulator said, was intended to reinforce the fact that, “responsibility for meeting the licence condition rests with licensees, not third parties”.In addition, a new licence condition was introduced, which requires licensees to report any cases of organised money lending they are aware of.Licensees would no longer be required to make the Commission aware of investment, which is not by way of subscription for shares, but now would be required to tell the Commission if a figure in a senior position at the licensee takes on a different senior position at the same company.As well as this, those who hold a licence would no longer be required to notify the regulator of the receipt of reports of the outcome of compliance assessments from regulatory or government bodies.The changes would also add a new licence condition specifying that licensees must notify the Commission of any actual or potential breaches of  Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing and Transfer of Funds regulations.Personal licence holders will have the period of time in which they must report key events extended.The regulator would also shorten the reporting period to annual returns to within 28 days of the end of the financial year, creating a deadline of 28 April, rather than 42 days.In addition, the LLCP would be amended so that customers placing such bets must not be in breach of any rules on betting or misuse of inside information, as opposed to simply rules about irregular or suspicious betting. The changes would also introduce standardised formats for reporting of suspicious betting activity, which the Commission said it hoped would, “improve efficiency in data collection.” Under the changes, the Commission would also no longer require operators to notify the Commission about persons they have authorised to offer pool betting in racing or football.The section concerning the reporting of key financial events such as winding-up orders and bankruptcy was also amended, but only to list all of these events more briefly.The social responsibility code would be amended to allow the Commission to specify the form and manner in which results of inspections involving underage gambling are provided to the Commission.The Commission’s proposals also included changes to regulatory returns and collection of statistics. The regulator says it will collect less data overall, but more that deals with the prevention of fambling-related harm.“We also intend to introduce new datapoints that place a greater focus on our commitment towards consumers and the prevention of gambling-related harms, and to implement several changes focused on improving data quality,” the Commission said.The Commission would no longer ask for non-GB data to be broken down by sport and game category, for the number of gaming machines sold or gambling software data to be reported by title. The regulator said it also hopes to publish Industry Statistics within 6 months of the end of the reporting period, as opposed to seven to eight months.Stakeholders will be able to provide their input on any or all of the proposed changes. When the consultation closes, the Commission will publish one or more consultation response documents within three months.Any changes to the LCCP as a result of this consultation will most likely take place in October 2020. The Commission will provide licence holders with at least three months’ notice before LCCP changes come into force. Casino & games The British Gambling Commission has launched a consultation on potential changes to the licence conditions and codes of practice (LCCP) which all licensees must adhere to, mostly to change the ways in which licensees must report key events to the regulator. Tags: Online Gambling Regions: UK & Ireland Topics: Casino & games Finance Legal & compliance AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Addresslast_img read more

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Spelinspektionen looks to clarify decisions on licence terms

first_img Tags: Spelinspektionen Email Address Licensing Regions: Nordics Sweden Spelinspektionen looks to clarify decisions on licence terms This essentially meant that these subsidiaries owed more than it was worth, or had no supporting capital to fund its operations. In the case of operators’ subsidiaries, these are often used to apply for licences, with funding coming from the parent company.  It comes after a number of applicants for a licence in 2019 were only issued year-long licences, on the basis that the subsidiary companies through which the operators filed their submissions were in negative equity.  21st October 2020 | By Robin Harrison AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter It explained that when it dealt with an applicant in negative equity, the three-year licence would hinge on whether the business had a satisfactory guarantee that the company in question had the capital to operate over the licence term.  As a result Spelinspektionen had limited a number of licensees’ licence terms, including those issued to Gaming Innovation Group and Aspire Global. In each case, the operator challenged the regulator’s decision in the Administrative Court of Linköping, and by doing secured three-year licences, two years shorter than the maximum five years. Spelinspektionen director general Camilla Rosenberg has previously explained to iGB that the regulations are likely to evolve and the regulator adapt its approach to applying the rules for a number of years following the Gaming Act’s implementation.  It seems likely that other controversial issues, such as the implementation of the ban on betting on sports involving players aged 18 and under, and marketing regulations, will also be subject to similar clarifications. Sweden’s Gaming Inspectorate (Spelinspektionen) has explained its position on how licensees’ financial health affects their licence terms, the first of a number of clarifications to be issued on its interpretation of contentious elements of the country’s gambling regulations. Topics: Legal & compliance Licensing Regulation Should an operator look to renew their licence when they remain in negative equity, however, this will be rejected. Spelinspektionen said that whether or not that company had a capital guarantee, they would not meet the requirements of having a sound financial structure as set out in the Gaming Act.  Spelinspektionen said that it would use the court’s decisions as a precedence for future decisions on companies in a similar position, meaning that those in negative equity would be issued with three-year licences.  Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter This, she explained, would allow the Swedish courts to determine how best to interpret elements of the regulations. last_img read more

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CFC Stanbic Holdings Limited (CFC.ke) 2008 Annual Report

first_imgCFC Stanbic Holdings Limited (SBIC.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2008 annual report.For more information about CFC Stanbic Holdings Limited (SBIC.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the CFC Stanbic Holdings Limited (SBIC.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: CFC Stanbic Holdings Limited (SBIC.ke)  2008 annual report.Company ProfileCFC Stanbic Holdings Limited is a financial service, insurance agency and stock broking company in Kenya offering products and services to the personal, commercial, corporate and investment banking sectors. The company also has division servicing clients in the Republic of South Sudan. Its corporate and investment banking division services range from transactional banking, debt securities and equity trading to project, structured and trade financing. Its personal and commercial banking division offers services ranging from The Corporate and Investment Banking segment offers foreign exchange, and debt securities and equities trading services; transactional banking and investor services; investment banking services, such as project finance, advisory, structured finance, structured trade finance, corporate lending, primary markets, and property finance services; and wealth management and advisory services to larger corporates, financial institutions, and international counterparties. The Personal and Business Banking segment provides residential accommodation loans to individual customers; installment sales and finance leases, including installment finance in the consumer vehicles market, and vehicles and equipment finance in the business market; and card facilities to individuals and businesses. This segment also offers transactional and lending products comprising deposit taking, electronic banking, cheque accounts, and other lending products associated with the various points of contact channels, such as ATMs, Internet, and branches. The company was formerly known as CfC Stanbic Holdings Limited and changed its name to Stanbic Holdings Plc in October 2016. The company is based in Nairobi, Kenya. Stanbic Holdings Plc is a subsidiary of Stanbic Africa Holdings Limited. CFC Stanbic Holdings Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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Champion Breweries Plc (CHAMPB.ng) 2012 Annual Report

first_imgChampion Breweries Plc (CHAMPB.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Beverages sector has released it’s 2012 annual report.For more information about Champion Breweries Plc (CHAMPB.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Champion Breweries Plc (CHAMPB.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Champion Breweries Plc (CHAMPB.ng)  2012 annual report.Company ProfileChampion Breweries Plc is an established brewery in Nigeria manufacturing Champion Lager Beer and Champ Malta as well as a selection on non-alcoholic beverages. The company also brews and packages products under contract to Nigerian Breweries Plc. The main brands in its product portfolio are Champion Lager Beer and Champ Malta. Champ Malta is a flavoured beer with a golden colour and distinct aroma. The company has undergone a number of name changes; established as South East Breweries Limited, the name changed to Cross River Breweries Limited and thereafter to Champion Breweries Limited which was later changed to Champion Breweries Plc. In 2011, Consolidated Breweries acquired a 57% equity stake in Champion Breweries which was originally held by Montgomery Ventures Inc (Panama). In 2013, Raysun Nigeria Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Heineken, purchased Consolidated Breweries and now holds a majority equity stake in Champion Breweries Plc. The company’s head office is in Akwa Ibon state, Nigeria. Champion Breweries Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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HF Group Limited (HFCK.ke) HY2012 Interim Report

first_imgHF Group Limited (HFCK.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Property sector has released it’s 2012 interim results for the half year.For more information about HF Group Limited (HFCK.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the HF Group Limited (HFCK.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: HF Group Limited (HFCK.ke)  2012 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileHF Group Limited formerly (Housing Finance Limited) is a financial services group with interests in mortgage lending, corporate and retail banking, property development and a bancassurance business. Its product and service offering ranges from transactional banking products to financial services for micro-enterprises, group banking, agricultural and small-to-medium enterprises. HF Group offers asset finance services, micro-credit loans and loans for anything from solar water heating systems to mortgage finance. The company also has interests in developing and selling residential houses and offers insurance agency services. Formerly known as HF Group Limited, the company changed its name to HF Group Plc in 2017. Its head office is in Nairobi, Kenya. HF Group Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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Remembering the last Lions home game

first_img TAGS: Highlight We take you back to 2005 with an oral history of the 25-all draw between the British & Irish Lions and Argentina, played out in Cardiff before the tour to New Zealand A rare sighting of Lions and Pumas in Cardiff, 2005 (Getty Images) Remembering the last Lions home gameIn May 2005, the British & Irish Lions took to the Principality Stadium, then known as the Millennium Stadium, to take on Argentina. It was a rare warm-up match played on home soil – an event to kick off a tour like no other in New Zealand. What unfolded was later described as “a bit of a wake-up call” as a thoroughly depleted Pumas side took their much-vaunted hosts to the brink of chastening defeat, with Jonny Wilkinson – playing his first Test rugby since he kicked England to Rugby World Cup glory in 2003 – saving Lions blushes with an injury-time penalty to make it 25-25. Their sojourn to the Land of the Long White Cloud has passed into folklore. Fans today still slam head coach Clive Woodward’s plan to take a “top heavy back-up staff” and over 50 players with them on the way to a Blackwash of three Test losses against New Zealand. However, we’re only interested in one game, right at the start of all that. Sir Clive Woodward assesses his Lions squad before game one, 2005 (Getty Images)As the class of 2021 prepare for a Lions home game for the first time since 2005 when they take on Japan in Edinburgh on 26 June, we walk down the boulevard of broken memories to offer new perspectives on a moment in rugby history some will have purposely suppressed. After all, many from Argentina may see things a little differently… From the day the Lions squad was named on 11 April (initially with 20 English, 11 Irish, ten Welsh, three Scots and no J. Wilkinson – but hey, things change fast) to departing for New Zealand on 25 May, plenty happened. Here we hear from a cast of Lions players and staff, some Pumas and a match referee who all played their part and have different emotional souvenirs from the time. THE BUILD-UPMichael Owen, Lions No 8 (captain): “When you’re playing I think it’s quite hard to grasp what’s happening sometimes, because it’s like ‘the next thing’ all the time. “Obviously the Lions is particularly special, but you finish the season, you have time to prepare, you get into the Lions camp and then you get on with it. At the time it’s difficult to get appreciation for what it is, the achievement. But it was definitely something special.“I don’t remember the moment where I was told that I was being captain for that game, which is quite strange as I can normally remember those sorts of details quite well!”Argentina captain Felipe Contepomi with Michael Owen (Getty Images)Ollie Smith, Lions centre: “They named the Lions tour squad and I remember the dates, because it was horrendous that week. They named the group on Monday the 11th of April, and my dad dropped dead of a heart attack on Wednesday the 14th of April. “I’d had a good career at that point – I’d played well the last year to 18 months, while I’d only had a few caps for England at the time. I was probably one of the better centres in Europe at the time – in the British Isles, certainly – on form. But being named for the Lions was a big surprise as I hadn’t really played that much for England.“I’d played well against Brian O’Driscoll and Gordon D’Arcy for Leicester against Leinster and I think O’Driscoll probably helped me get on that tour, he maybe put a good word towards Clive because he was a big part of that tour, being captain.“So I was going to tour and one part of me is going, “Oh my god, my dad is a typical father figure and was so important to my career and very suddenly he is not here any more.” I’m now in a Lions camp, trying to motivate myself. It was a huge emotional roller coaster.“Playing for the Lions was amazing, but the person I wanted there the most just vanished out of my world, six weeks ago. I was dealing with my mum grieving, my sister grieving, and in hindsight I probably should have pulled out the tour. But you don’t pull out of Lions tours, I just couldn’t, you don’t know when you’ll get another chance.”Chris Cusiter, Lions replacement scrum-half: “That first week I barely remember the team announcement. I remember feeling equal parts excited to wear the famous red jersey for the first time and terrified that something would happen and I wouldn’t make it onto the plane to New Zealand.“The prep was fun, training at the Vale of Glamorgan. The build-up I remember being quite relaxed, not too much pressure. Mainly basic organisation.”Midweek coach Ian McGeechan with the Lions (Getty Images)Smith: “The Vale had a great set-up out the back. We also got to a local club – I remember training somewhere in that valley. I don’t know the area that well, you know what it’s like when you’re in camp. You get stuck on a bus, driven somewhere, get off and train!”Owen: “The thing for me that really sticks out is that everything was in Wales (for that game). We trained, bizarrely, in the place where I trained for Pontypridd U11, the U15s and through to the Pontypridd senior team. It was a place now called University of South Wales Playing Fields. “I sat in the same seat that I sat then, when I was an U11 schoolboy, so that was a big memory for me, for the week. It was amazing. In terms of the preparation, I remember little bits of the stuff we were trying to do, but on the whole of that Lions tour I felt like we never really nailed the rugby side of things.”Craig White, Lions S&C: “I remember players were tired and I was amazed by the sheer size of the playing and coaching group. It was a huge operation.“I also remember doing a team-building exercise where we split into teams of four and we had to paint an image given to us (it was a piece of a jigsaw). When we had finished each piece, it was put together without us knowing and then the completed painting, as each piece fit together, was unleashed. It was a Lions logo/collage with a lion. It was quite cool and everyone had their picture taken in front of it.“Whilst it was quite cool I couldn’t help thinking that it would have been cheaper and more of a bonding experience to have a piss-up!“I don’t really remember anything about the training week apart from feeling like we were miles off the pace.”Cusiter: “We also went to the FA Cup final between Arsenal and Man United. We met players like Rio Ferdinand at the hotel, etc.”Gavin Scott, Lions analyst: “Was it the FA Cup final? We certainly went to a football match!”Referee Stuart Dickinson looks after Waratahs v Reds, 2005 (Getty Images)Stuart Dickinson, referee: “I’d done the Waratahs versus the Reds in Super Rugby on 6 May, and then the British & Irish Lions on the 23rd. So I was there ten days before. Then on the 28th I was in charge of England versus the Barbarians at Twickenham.“The groundskeeper who looked after the Millennium (at the time) later moved to Australia. I had done a number of games there and built a good relationship with him. I had gone along to the ground that week and they were playing the FA Cup final. He said to me, ‘You might want to come to the game.’ I said ‘Yeah, absolutely’, and he said, ‘Well, I’ll get you a ticket.’“It was really interesting. That’s the first and only game with Premier League teams I’ve ever seen and it was the FA Cup final. All the blokes I know that know soccer they go, ‘You’re kidding, aren’t you?!’”Scott: “As the analyst I was heavily involved with both the coaching teams. It was a big group of coaches, famously split into two groups (midweek and Test sides). “That whole week there was lots of selection chat going on and talking about the game – Woodward sort of set out his vision for how it might go, his potential selections as the tour grew. The sad thing was when Iain Balshaw turned up injured, he just didn’t quite make it, and the interesting thing was seeing that large coaching group pick who the next guy was.“For me it was great memories of a dynamic group of people. “You saw the dynamics and the coaches were very fair. My recollection is really that Woody (Woodward) almost let them lead on the player a coach thought should be in, saying for instance, ‘What’s he like, this player who plays for you?” They’d each speak about them. “And at that level, it’s always based on the squad. That’s the thing players may forget. A single player may say ‘it’s me versus him and I’m better’. Whereas often a decision is more around covering more than one thing.” Smith: “They named the group quite early in the week and we got split up, so it was like, right, ‘You 22 to 23 are going to be the focus of this Argentinian game’. So you’re planning for a six-week tour of New Zealand and games to come but also for the short term, you’re going to play against Argentina at the end of the week. “We would have started to look at plays and look at things that hopefully we’re gonna carry forward into the tour, and starting to get familiar. Some guys knew each other better than others, having played in international teams together or played against each other a lot. I was pretty new to it. I was rooming with Ronan O’Gara that week, which was interesting.”Bernardo Stortoni had a stint with Bristol (Getty Images)Bernardo Stortoni, Argentina full-back: “I was in Biarritz visiting a friend when the union called me to tell me we would play the Lions. I was walking through town and I was very excited. It was an incredible experience. “A lot of players were playing in the finals in France (so couldn’t represent Argentina).“We met nine days before the Test match and the coaches told us to enjoy the game and the moment. We were analysing player by player since the Lions had not played together. It was difficult to analyse.”Mariano Sambucetti, Argentina lock: “We had several injuries and I think the biggest factor was that French clubs were not releasing our players. Argentina were quite heavy on the amount of players playing in France then. “As soon as you got the call-up, you said, ‘Oh my god, what an opportunity this is!’ It doesn’t come very often. Any call-up where your country is something special, but then this type of game. It’s not something very common, especially being from Argentina. “We arrived (in Wales), we started looking at the team and we had several that haven’t played (for Argentina), several that are coming through. I mean, everyone knows if you’re in the original line-up normally or not. And also we had several guys, like Federico Mendez for example, who basically came out of retirement to play.“It was one of those where there were a lot of old heads. These guys like Lisandro Arbizu, Mendez, then there were great players like Felipe (Contepomi), Jose Nunez Piossek, and some younger ones or others who were in contention.“During the week we trained very tough. And one key factor was that Les Cusworth (former Leicester and England ten) was helping us. He had a very good insight into the Lions players. Argentina had an important twist on its professionalism in their approach, preparing for games around that time. That’s where 2007’s great World Cup comes from. It’s also safe to say that there was a big merger of upcoming players and very, very experienced natural leaders. “During the week, I’ll be honest with you, there was basically fear. Fear of embarrassment. The old heads like Mendez, Reggiardo and Ledesma have a lot on the line with their reputation. These guys set the tone of taking it like an amateur spirit of saying, ‘Let’s go in and surprise everyone. You know we’ve got nothing to lose. Let’s put pressure on them.’“The one key moment I thought in the week was when Les presented this whole analysis, he said ‘Okay, this is who they are,’ showing all their attributes, all the players, how good they were, etc, etc. Then we said, ‘Okay, that’s as far as we respect them. Right now, from where we leave this meeting room, this is over. Now it’s on us’.” Jonny Wilkinson’s international return created a buzz (Getty Images)Scott: “Guys like (Sambucetti) who played in the Premiership, we obviously knew a number of the Argentina players anyway, but on a tour like that there’s usually a ‘we need to concentrate on ourselves first’ attitude. “On a Lions tour, my recollection was, you’re also thinking, ‘This is game one… this team might also play game three. The other team might play game two. What is it?’ It’s all the basics of what our lineout calls are going to be, and all that stuff that happens at a rugby club in August over weeks has to be done in a couple of days on a Lions tour. “So there was a much bigger concentration on the Lions development side of things, whereas Argentina would be a strong side regardless, just because of the attitude they bring. They are such a big-game team, that’s always why they do so well at World Cups. “Looking at that squad again, that was one that haunted us for years in Scotland. Ledesma and some of the guys that came through went all the way to 2011. So while there were guys who didn’t play so much, they also had a team that was going to be something.” THE WAY TO THE GROUND AND THE WARM-UPSmith: “I remember being very nervous – I always got nervous before games, whether I was playing U15s or for the British & Irish Lions. The anxiety was kind of ‘make sure you don’t let yourself down, make sure you do your bits well’, but that would have been no different to whoever was playing the game. “I just remember running out in that red, at the Millennium Stadium… with crowds! Not a huge, huge crowd but a good crowd. I think it was a decent crowd for it.”Tour captain Brian O’Driscoll, Matt Dawson and other Lions in the stand (Inpho)Dickinson: “The atmosphere in the ground was just fantastic. I remember they said we’re going to start in an hour and then we got 15 minutes (more) because of the number of people that have turned up late and selling extra tickets… So that built the atmosphere.“I think there was the whole theatre of that, of the Lions people perhaps thinking it would go to script or that this would be a 100-nil or training run…” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sambucetti: “One funny story was when we were on the bus as it comes out of the Hilton. The police (escort) comes in front of us but we couldn’t move as there were so many people there and the whole thing was dyed in red.“I see all those fans and I think ‘…holy s**t…’. And then they see that it’s Argentina and now I’m thinking ‘Oh my god, they’re gonna kill us!’ And then they start chanting ‘AR-GEN-TINA! AR-GEN-TINA!’ The whole tone was fantastic. Phenomenal. “And then from the back seat of the bus, we hear Federico Mendez say, ‘Did you boys bring an extra bag? Because we’re going to need it for all the points we are going to take here!’“We thought we were going to be in trouble!”Geordan Murphy, Lions full-back: “I remember working with Dave Alred (kicking coach) before the game, in the warm-up. I remember him coming over and saying ‘Why don’t you try this?’ and giving me some sort of slight adjustments to my kicking and I was thinking, ‘oh, that’s quite unusual to be given something like that so close to the game’.”Owen: “Everyone was really excited and looking forward to the game and I can remember the warm-up and stuff. I remember speaking to the coach. It just felt like one of those games, it was just really bitty.”Stortoni: “I remember it was a very complete (Lions) team, with many English world champions. And the backs were terribly good players, excellent.”The Lions line-up (Getty Images)Owen: “It’s just my recollection but it was like we thought we’d be okay and we’d just come for a game and a useful run-out. But it didn’t feel like we really prepared that intensely and we weren’t that clear on how we’re going to play. That was my memory of it. “With the lineouts and stuff we just weren’t that prepared and there’s disappointment there because we had a really good team, and we didn’t really do ourselves justice on the day. And Argentina, I think they really were still fighting for recognition.”Related: The British & Irish Lions and Music THE GAMEStortoni: “I think we surprised them with our press and tackle. They were not expecting it. We were able to score points fast.”Scott: “I remember it being tough and It felt like we were thrown together a bit, which is what the team is (at the start of) a Lions tour. I remember we went down early to a try (for Piossek) and never quite recovered.“And it was like this for two or three games, where there was some really, really good stuff but there’s a lot of handling errors and mistakes.”Some of the savage defence from Argentina (Getty Images)Dickinson: “You knew to expect that competitiveness where the Argentinians really took it to them. Alright, (as a ref) you never try and pan out something to say ‘I think this is gonna happen’, but you’re trying to prepare for everything and you just knew there was going to be some tight things here where they’re going to have a go at them at scrum time and then they’ve got to take them on because that’s the Latin way. You know they want to be physical. “They pressured them. Poor Gareth Cooper (Lions nine) kept getting caught a few times and he was getting frustrated. I don’t ever remember saying it to him, but a journalist, one of the Irish guys, came up to me afterwards and said I’d provided a funny moment for the press box. “I asked what was that and he relayed something on Cooper sort of whinging and saying ‘They’re offside’ and I said ‘No, if you just stop taking a step when you get the ball and get rid of it early, you might not get caught.’ It wasn’t meant to be demeaning to Gareth, just get on with the game, because he was under pressure.”Cusiter: “I don’t know if you’ve ever played with any Argentinians, but they try harder than anybody else. Especially with someone like the Lions, they were just going absolutely crazy. You’ll never see anybody try as hard as that. “Then they got ahead and it was just like, ‘Oh s**t, the Lions are going to lose their first game to Argentina!’”Dickinson: “The Pumas were just a step ahead, mentally.“At the end of the day they were very much up for the contest and I think that just sort of smacked the Lions between the eyes. And by the time it went whack, whack, whack, ‘Oh, where are we, jeez we’re 19-16 down, we better pull the finger out.’ That was part of the deal, you know these guys had really come to play.”Just six minutes into the game, Argentina score a try through Piossek. With a harried Cooper spilling ball, the Pumas worked the turnover through scattered medics and players. Felipe Contepomi sliced past the Lions front five and worked the ball to the wing just in time. Sambucetti: “I cannot forget that try.“Jose is like a pickpocket – he always finds a way of getting in with crowded places and coming out with something. I was at a ruck, there was a turnover and pass-pass, and Jose was going for the line. I couldn’t believe it. It was just a message that we could do it.”Just after quarter of an hour, the Lions get on the board with a try from Ollie Smith. With the Lions lineout securing ball, it’s worked to Wilkinson, who draws a few defenders, pushes his arms through and offloads to Smith on his shoulder, with the Leicester centre powering to the line, diving between two converging defenders.Smith: “Like any decent centre, if someone takes the ball to the line you try to run lines. And then Jonny Wilkinson, he wasn’t a bad fly-half in fairness…”Cusiter: “I’d never seen somebody who could pass the ball like Jonny Wilkinson before. It was just unbelievable, throwing absolute lasers in training.”Scott: There were these bits, like when Jonny put Ollie away, and I see that with things like in the Bay of Plenty game that was next that was the same: there was lots of stilted stuff, and there was some absolute genius play that made you go ‘Wow, this is what we’re capable of’.”Ollie Smith goes over as Stortoni catches his boot (Getty Images)Smith: “He got his arms free and popped it to me and then it was just kind of a foot race to the line. The full-back was across one way and the blind winger was doing his job that well and was probably where the full-back should have been at the time. And, yeah, foot down. I did have a turn of pace before my knee went! “I got to the line, I remember diving over between the two of them and I lost my boot! It was probably a good bit of advertising for Puma then.“The thing is, I’d been playing with Darryl Gibson and he was great at taking the ball to the line – he was a strong, hard bastard in fairness – and would often get half the shoulder and get his arms free. We had an amazing, amazing team at Leicester at the time so if you get your arms free and offload to someone, you’re guaranteed to score a try.”But Argentina kept coming and with a vicious defence and with their powerful set-piece they wrestled the advantage. But they had something else up their sleeve: the sublime kicking of Federico Todeschini. The scrum pressure did not let up either.Sambucetti: “it’s something intrinsic and it just grows and grows on the park – it was one of those days (for Todeschini). And also as soon as you smell blood and you’re thinking, ‘It’s blood from the Lions’, it’s hard not to get excited.”Cusiter: “I remember coming on with about 20 minutes ago and being absolutely terrified but also excited. Obviously it was at the Millennium Stadium where I’d got my first Scotland cap, and this was gonna be my first game for the Lions.“I remember the first pass I made was an absolute zinger and the first few passes actually were some of the best passes I’ve ever made, so I kind of settled me down and I just really enjoyed it. I made a half-break at one point, made a couple of good tackles… Yeah I just absolutely loved it, it was incredible. “And then I remember obviously getting through to injury time.” Sambucetti: “Tell the referee I still don’t forgive him – he went for eight minutes too long!”Dickinson: “You can go back and tell him it’s just the way it is, it’s not just 80 minutes right so when that when the clock comes up, you’ve got to wait for the particular break and all that sort of stuff, it can feel like 100 hours for the poor bastards!”Cusiter: “Somebody dropped the ball – Gordon D’Arcy I think (it was) – and somehow we got another shot and we got the penalty. Obviously Jonny kicked it with the last kick of the game for us to draw.”Wilkinson kicks a penalty to make it 25-25 (Getty Images)Stortoni: “I grabbed that ball and kicked it into the stand, very angry from having (not won). Ha, ha, I regret that. But I’m sure some Welsh fan must have saved the ball!”Sambucetti: “When he (the referee) goes penalty, first it was us asking ‘Is it finished, is it finished, is it finished?’ When it was a penalty, we thought okay. My only fear was that he didn’t continue after that, and I thought,’ Okay, well, we’ll take the draw, but this isn’t fair.’ “But you’ll look back on a career and it’s about those unique moments. We always talk about spirit, teamwork, and you can go on and on about it but it’s those times where everything just clicks and aligns and you go in there as the underdog and it happens on a world stage with everyone watching it… Personally for me it’s my best rugby memory.”The scoreboard shows the Argentina players celebrating after the draw (Getty Images)Smith: “With not much time on the clock, it’s quite hard to get to the end against a team that’s willing to chase everything down and pounce on every opportunity. That’s what they did for the majority of the game, they lived off our silly little mistakes, our silly knock-ons where we’re probably losing shape and overthinking things.“God knows how we got to draw at the end but Jonny kicks it and thankfully we walked away with the draw at the end. We got bad press for it but if you said in that press conference ‘I reckon in two years time this group (Argentina) plus a few others will finish third in the next World Cup,’ you’d agree that you could see that.”THE IMMEDIATE AFTERMATHStortoni: I remember the walk to the hotel from the Millennium. We were walking, not with the bus. We stopped and talked with the British and Irish fans.”Sambucetti: “That’s true, that’s true. “It was a big contrast with the situation from going from the hotel to the field. We certainly didn’t expect to come back with a draw, that felt like a win. On the way back we walked to the hotel and everyone was… Well, you know how it gets after a match! When you see that you just slip the tie off and go into town with them. “It got very friendly, let’s say!”A Lions fan looks on as his team struggle to a draw (Getty Images)Cusiter: “There was relief not to be coming off with a defeat but for me I was just buzzing, so full of adrenaline, so excited. I was so chuffed with how I’d played, chuffed that I was now a British & Irish Lion, chuffed that I wasn’t injured, chuffed that we’re leaving for New Zealand a couple of days after.“I know a lot of people have negative memories of that tour. But I loved every second, I loved that first game, loved the tour, loved the midweeks, and yeah fond memories of all of it.”Smith: “I can remember just everyone being really, genuinely decent blokes.“They’re down-to-earth guys and they’d be the sort of person who would take the posts in or help you move a sofa if you needed help. Rugby’s got very few idiots and the ones that are get found out unless they’re very, very talented and they can piss off out the game.”Owen: “Reflecting back on it, we’ve been fortunate that it was given Test status after the event. It’s phenomenal for us. it’s actually quite a good concept (a Lions home game), isn’t it, and it’s brilliant for this year with one game at home before you leave.” Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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Forja House / Pablo Pita Arquitectos

first_imgArchDaily “COPY” Forja House / Pablo Pita Arquitectos Portugal 2018 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/955741/forja-house-pablo-pita-arquitectos Clipboard Save this picture!© José Campos+ 22Curated by Matheus Pereira Share Forja House / Pablo Pita ArquitectosSave this projectSaveForja House / Pablo Pita Arquitectos Year:  “COPY”center_img Architects: Pablo Pita Arquitectos Year Completion year of this architecture project Projects CopyCabins & Lodges, Houses•Cinfães, Portugal Photographs Cabins & Lodges ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/955741/forja-house-pablo-pita-arquitectos Clipboard CopyAbout this officePablo Pita ArquitectosOfficeFollowProductsGlassConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsHospitality ArchitectureLodgingCabins & LodgesResidential ArchitectureHousesCinfãesResidential ArchitecturePortugalPublished on January 26, 2021Cite: “Forja House / Pablo Pita Arquitectos” [Casa Forja / Pablo Pita Arquitectos] 26 Jan 2021. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodGRP Siding Façade SystemGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisMill Finished Copper: Nordic StandardMetallicsHAVER & BOECKERArchitectural Wire Mesh – MULTI-BARRETTE 8130Enclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsSealantsEffisusGutter Repair – TiteGutter3Aluminium CompositesSculptformAluminium Click-on BattensTiles / Mosaic / GresiteMargresPorcelain Tiles – Linea PrestigeMetallicsRHEINZINKZinc Roof Systems – Click Roll CapsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteTerrealTerracotta Cladding TileDoorsECLISSESliding Pocket Door – ECLISSE UnilateralWindowsJoskoWindows and Sliding Doors – ONE SeriesMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Photographs:  José CamposDesign Team:Pablo Rebelo, Pedro PitaConsultants:GatecConstruction:José Jesus Mouta, João Moreira & FilhosCity:CinfãesCountry:PortugalMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© José CamposRecommended ProductsWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityWoodBlumer LehmannFree Form Structures for Wood ProjectsWoodTechnowoodPergola SystemsDoorsVEKADoors – VEKAMOTION 82Text description provided by the architects. Forja House is a small dwelling located in a Portuguese village, close to Douro River. The nature of the terrain, characterized by a succession of slopes, defines the typology of the solution, embedded in the hill. Facing a privileged landscape, but facing the northeast, a slender solution is chosen to maintain the views, without giving up the best solar orientation – opening generous spaces on bothsides.Save this picture!© José CamposSave this picture!Plan – Ground floorSave this picture!© José CamposThe context is bucolic, with difficult access and close to some houses. Among these, the oldest in schist stand out, mixed with more recent examples that fail to mimic older models, resulting in a partially uncharacteristic context.Save this picture!© José CamposSave this picture!AxonométricaSave this picture!© José CamposThe house, more isolated from this set, assumes its contemporary and abstract nature.Save this picture!© José CamposSave this picture!© José CamposThe interior is characterized by the simplicity of its materials, also reflected in a clear and direct typological design. The social floor resumes to a single central volume in plywood, contrasting with the concrete floor. A fluid design is intended, with the living, dining and kitchen spaces connected as an informal and contiguous area. The relation with nature is privileged with generous windows.The fact that this floor is elevated results in a close relation with the canopies, which have a very strong presence in the characterization of the interior social space. The lower floor, partially buried, and associated with the sleeping area, has a more protected and cavernous logicSave this picture!© José CamposSave this picture!Section elevationSave this picture!© José CamposProject gallerySee allShow lessV&A Bags: Inside Out Exhibition / Studio MUTTSelected ProjectsMahallat Residential Building No3 / CAAT StudioSelected Projects Sharelast_img read more

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Community Fund to check recipients’ Web sites for support for terrorism

first_imgThis approach simply confirms that fundraising in all its forms is not solely restricted to the “fundraising pages” of a Web site. A trust fundraiser’s hard work in an application to the Community Fund could be wasted if her colleagues in other teams or departments have published controversial material on the charity’s Web site.The Community Fund’s research will focus on the Web sites of about 5,000 organisations.  15 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Community Fund to check recipients’ Web sites for support for terrorism Howard Lake | 17 October 2002 | News The Community Fund is to examine the Web sites of about 5,000 organisations it has funded to ensure that they do not contain any “expressions of sympathy for terrorism,” reports ThirdSector magazine.Some grant-makers have used charities’ Web sites for some time as an additional source of background information on a charity seeking funding. Now the Community Fund is to scan Web sites to run a “hygiene check” that none of the groups providing legal advice that it has funded publish any expressions of sympathy for terrorism.The move follows the controversy, stoked by the Daily Mail, about the Community Fund’s support for the National Coalition of Anti-Deportation Campaigns and the Community Empowerment Network. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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CDF to run the Faith Communities Capacity Building Fund

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  24 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis CDF to run the Faith Communities Capacity Building Fund Howard Lake | 3 October 2005 | News Applicants must be based in England and/or Wales and be faith-based groups/organisations; inter-faith groups/organisations; or multicultural community centres and voluntary and community organisations carrying out inter-faith activities or working with faith communities. Applications are also open to partnerships between several faith or inter-faith groups/ organisations in an area.The closing date for applications is 2 December 2005. The Community Development Foundation (CDF) has been commissioned by the Cohesion and Faith Unit of the Home Office to run the Faith Communities Capacity Building Fund.The fund, which covers England and Wales, will support faith and inter-faith groups/organisations strengthen their capacity in order to play a fuller part in civil society/community cohesion. It will also fund inter-faith activities which increase community cohesion.The CDF is now inviting applications for small grants (up to £5,000) or large grants (over £5,000) which are available between January 2006 to March 2007. Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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